School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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A guide to complexity and organizations

A guide to complexity and organizations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“change to more people orientated business will be challenge to introduce to colleagues - its a change we need http://t.co/5Amtb5VluT #SHCR”


Via Jürgen Kanz
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Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick

Technology: More than a tool, a new skill | The Thinking Stick | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

I have heard this said way too often-to the point, I believe, that some educators are using it to hide behind when it comes to using technology in their classrooms. 

Is Technology a tool? Yes.

Is it JUST a tool? No.

Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "The skills I’m talking about are skills of organization, of building research systems, and meta-cognition. Skills that go beyond the tools and deep into the learning process."

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Components of a Truly Effective Culture

Components of a Truly Effective Culture | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Forget the monolithic change management programs and focus on the elements of your culture that drive performance.

 

To sustain a true competitive edge, your culture should accelerate business performance. This is the ultimate goal of the critical few.

 

Four indicators can reveal that your culture is boosting the business.

 

1. Your culture taps into the waiting reserves of energy within lots of people. If you have a culture focused on a certain set of performance outcomes, and employees buy into it, people start reinforcing one another informally. Simply put, they increasingly help one another feel good about what they need to do. As a result, you gain a greater level of emotional commitment to the work that matters most.

 

2. Your culture guides down-the-line decision making. If you have a strong culture, you don’t need to have prescribed policies for every permutation of a situation. Employees can rely on cultural influences to help determine what they should do—they will act with speed, and they’ll take initiative. You simply do not need all those formal sign-offs when you have the right kind of cultural support. When nobody is there to give the approval, the culture guides the individual in how to act.

 

3. Your culture builds enduring execution capability. Over time, critical behaviors are repeated; as they turn into habits, people become faster and better at executing. You see evidence of greater customer loyalty, higher levels of the kinds of employee engagement that matter most for performance, higher degrees of emotional commitment to what the organization is focused on, a more rigorous pursuit of continuous improvement, and greater resilience in downturns.

 

4. Behaviors in normal times emulate positive behaviors during crisis situations. We often hear executives praise the collaborative, selfless, and energetic behaviors of their people during a crisis—and lament the fact that they don’t see more of those kinds of interactions normally. This difference is in large part explainable by the activation of cultural forces that occurs during a crisis. When you are focused on activating those forces all the time, you get that “special” level of performance all the time.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 3, 2014 7:53 PM
Critical informal leaders are important in culture change.
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Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems Turn In Their Homework | LD Topics | LD OnLine

Helping Children with Executive Functioning Problems Turn In Their Homework | LD Topics | LD OnLine | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How can you help the child who does his homework, but then forgets to turn it in? Learn to help children with executive functioning problems plan and organize by reading these strategies.
Sharrock's insight:

These are some tips to share with teachers who are finding trouble getting homework from students with executive functioning problems. 

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