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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Why power corrupts – and how leaders can avoid the dark side

Why power corrupts – and how leaders can avoid the dark side | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Those who find themselves veering off course can rediscover their way by returning to their roots. 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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AlchemicalMedia's curator insight, October 11, 2015 1:54 PM

Self-awareness is once again key. There are many things to be aware of as a leader, but one's self is the best place to start.

donhornsby's curator insight, October 16, 2015 9:33 AM

(From the article): It’s not impossible for leaders who have been pulled to the dark side to return to the light. Just as people change for the worse, we can change for the better – as long as the desire is there.

JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, October 17, 2015 1:45 PM

This is one reason why it is important to surround yourself with people who are not afraid to tell you when you are doing something that is not right.

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Create A Sense of Belonging

Create A Sense of Belonging | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Having a sense of belonging is a common experience. Belonging means acceptance as a member or part. Such a simple word for huge concept. A sense of belonging is a human need, just like the need for food and shelter. Feeling that you belong  is most important in seeing value in life and in coping with intensely painful emotions. Some find belonging in a church, some with friends, some with family, and some on Twitter or other social media. Some see themselves as connected only to one or two people. Others believe and feel a connection to all people the world over, to humanity. Some struggle to find a sense of belonging and their loneliness is physically painful for them. 

Some seek belonging through excluding others. That reflects the idea that there must be those who don't belong in order for there to be those who do. Yet a single instance of being excluded can undermine self-control and well being and often creates pain and conflict.

A sense of belonging to a greater community improves your motivation, health, andhappiness.  When you see your connection to others, you know that all people struggle and have difficult times. You are not alone. There is comfort in that knowledge.

 

Dr. Gregory Walton developed a belonging intervention he called Attributional Retraining
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The Key to Preparing Difficult Students for the Real World

The Key to Preparing Difficult Students for the Real World | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Some of the best and most effective practices to motivate difficult students and improve their behavior at school are met with skepticism and even dismay from more than a handful of educators. These

Via Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 12, 2014 8:28 PM

John Dewey suggested classrooms were simplified communities which mirrored (were fractals) the larger community.

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The 4 Rs of Motivation

You are leading a project urgently needed by your organization. How can you best motivate your team to meet a demanding schedule? Should you offer bonuses if the team meets a deadline? Not according to Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (2009). Citing psychological research going back to Harry Harlow’s experiments with rhesus monkeys at the University of Wisconsin in 1949 and Edward Deci’s work with students at Carnegie–Mellon in 1969, Pink argues that “extrinsic” rewards—bananas or money—depress problem–solving performance. He believes that what most motivates people at work are the “intrinsic” rewards of mastering a task that engages them.

If it’s not wise to promise bonuses, what other motivational tools do you have?

Before you now decide you are better off not trying to motivate your team, let’s consider the proposition that Pink’s thesis fits some people in some contexts, but not others. This is what I’ve observed over 50 years of studying motivation, starting with the research on concept formation for my honors thesis at Harvard. In that study, I divided a group of students into those who scored high on a questionnaire measuring test anxiety and those who scored low. The students were then randomely placed in groups;some groups were promised rewards for correctly completing a task and others were not. The result: the anxious students did better at problem solving when there were no rewards, but those with low anxiety did better when stimulated by the possibility of gaining a reward. The pressure seemed to motivate them.

Sharrock's insight:

He states there is a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards: "mix of four Rs: Responsibilities, Relationships, Rewards, Reasons". Maccoby's paragraph on responsibilities focuses on the intrinsics--"People are motivated when their responsibilities are meaningful and engage their abilities and values." Meaning is something personal, ie intrinsic. He also discussed personal challenges when he said, "Craftsmen are motivated by the challenge to produce high–quality products." I liken this to an artist's aesthetics for creating art. 
In his section on "Relationships", I wonder if the quality of a relationship is an extrinsic reward/acknowledgement or intrinsic or a mixture of both. 
In the part about "Rewards", he does the most exploration of extrinsic rewards, namely about "pay", but he also states, "However, Jönsson finds that 80–85 percent of people who receive recognition for a job well done are satisfied even if it is not monetary, compared to 45–50 percent of those who are not recognized for their work." Which is along the lines of what I was saying about acknowledgements. They are more highly valued, but still extrinsic. 
Finally, in his section "Reasons", Maccoby notes, "Jönsson reports that Chinese workers are especially motivated because they have a sense that they work not only for themselves, but also for their country. They feel proud of being part of a winning team that is building a powerful economy. According to Jönsson, in China more than in the West, workers are interested in and aware of their company’s vision, and they see their own work in this larger context." This again is mixing intrinsics and extrinsics. 

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Sofia Cunha's curator insight, May 25, 2014 7:03 AM
Michael Maccoby apresenta os quatro aspectos que geram motivação (4 R's): Responsabilidade (Responsability), Relationships (Relações), Prémios (Rewards) e Razões (Reasons). 
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» “I Think I Can, I Think I Can” How Self-Efficacy Relates to Performance - Adventures in Positive Psychology

» “I Think I Can, I Think I Can” How Self-Efficacy Relates to Performance - Adventures in Positive Psychology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

“ Do you know the story of The Little Engine that Could? “As it neared the top of the grade, which had so discouraged the larger engines, it went more slowly. However, it still kept saying, I--think--I--can, I--think--I--can.”


Via Jamie Williamson, Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 20, 2014 7:36 AM
The importance of the inner voice in telling ourselves we can do it!
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Gamification Mythbusters: 3 Myths Calmly & Well Explained via @gamificationco

Gamification Mythbusters: 3 Myths Calmly & Well Explained via @gamificationco | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
There's a lot of misinformation on how gamification is supposed to work and I'm going to dispel some of those ideas.

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:05 AM

This is the best article I’ve read about why the Gartner all gamification will fail post is stupid AND gamification is harder than you realize.

 

The post takes 3 myths and patiently and completely explains the TRUTH of gamification - that is highly effective but neither easy or plug and play.


Myth 1:

Points, badges and leaderboards encourage competition and enhance performance

Marty - I agree. Leaderboards managed badly become disincentives. This is why Scoop. Its "horse race leaderboard" called MyCommunity is so brilliant as it only shows the horses running immediately behind and in front of me.


Myth 2:

Gamification is simple – assign points and badges, and you are done!


Marty - If you think about what we are doing you know "simple" doesn't apply. We are applying game theory to web marketing. Simple? Not at all, but what Internet marketing ever starts as "simple"? None that I've ever come across.


Myth 3:

Gamification increases participation and productivity of employees in boring, mechanical tasks


"Boring mechanical tasks are boring. Visiting a website is rarely either boring or mechanical, so I don't see this issue as important as it is for those attempting to adopt gamification for HR and other team building applications.

 

Mikko Hakala's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:40 AM

From conclusion: "Gamification holds tremendous promise .... but an over-simplified engagement strategy focusing only on points, badges and leaderboards, can do tremendous harm to the organization."

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What's the Best Way to Motivate People?

What's the Best Way to Motivate People? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The fact that motivational courses have flourished for decades means that people want to be more motivated. At the moment there are increasing reasons to feel exhausted, unmotivated, and eventually
Sharrock's insight:

from the article:

 

Seven Major Motivators

1. Having your work be noticed and appreciated.

2. Setting long-term goals that lead to satisfying results.

3. Doing work that you are passionate about.

4. Feeling that your bosses are loyal to you.

5. Open communications between workers and managers.

6. Feeling that you have job security.

7. Mastering a skill.

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Design for Multiple Motivations

Design for Multiple Motivations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
It's often claimed that everyone's incentives need to be the same in any successful system. However, no communities or individuals are identical. Instead, our experience has taught us that users have wildly differing incentives and motivations.

Via jean lievens
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Motivation Matters: 40% Of High School Students Chronically Disengaged From School - Forbes

Motivation Matters: 40% Of High School Students Chronically Disengaged From School - Forbes | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Lack of motivation is a real and pressing problem. Upwards of 40 percent of high school students are chronically disengaged from school, according to a 2003 National Research Council report on motivation.
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Studies suggest that students are more academically motivated when one of four conditions is present: when they feel competent enough to complete the task at hand; when they see a direct link between their actions and an outcome and have some control over whether or how to undertake a task; when the task has interest or value to them; and when completing the task brings social rewards, such as a sense of belonging to a group or approval from someone they care about."

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Neuroscience: The Power of Curiosity to Inspire Learning

Neuroscience: The Power of Curiosity to Inspire Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
When our curiosity is piqued, learning can be a snap and recalling the new information comes effortlessly. But when it comes to things we don’t care about—the recipe to that "delicious" holiday fru...
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Ranganath’s team discovered that as the students grew curious, activity increased in two brain regions (the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area and the nucleus accumbens) that are associated with reward and motivation. The level of curiosity seemed to control activity in these areas like a dimmer switch. During times of great curiosity, these two brain regions were very active. During moments of disinterest or even boredom, these areas shifted into low gear."

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Why You Hate Work

Why You Hate Work | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Excessive demands are leading to burnout everywhere.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "A 2012 global work force study of 32,000 employees by the consulting company Towers Watson found that the traditional definition of engagement — the willingness of employees to voluntarily expend extra effort — is no longer sufficient to fuel the highest levels of performance. Willing, it turns out, does not guarantee able. Companies in the Towers Watson study with high engagement scores measured in the traditional way had an operating margin of 14 percent. By contrast, companies with the highest number of “sustainably engaged” employees had an operating margin of 27 percent, nearly three times those with the lowest traditional engagement scores."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 11, 2014 11:59 AM

Not only do we hate work, we hate the commute to and from our work. I told colleagues I would teach for 1/2 the price. That was the wrong thing to say to other teachers. Apparently, even limited altruism is not welcome. When we work for money, it is inevitable that we will become unhappy. When we work for the love of what we do, we find ways to overcome the obstacles.

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Qualitative Validity

There has been considerable debate among methodologists about the value and legitimacy of this alternative set of standards for judging qualitative research. On the one hand, many quantitative researchers see the alternative criteria as just a relabeling of the very successful quantitative criteria in order to accrue greater legitimacy for qualitative research. They suggest that a correct reading of the quantitative criteria would show that they are not limited to quantitative research alone and can be applied equally well to qualitative data. They argue that the alternative criteria represent a different philosophical perspective that is subjectivist rather than realist in nature. They claim that research inherently assumes that there is some reality that is being observed and can be observed with greater or less accuracy or validity. if you don't make this assumption, they would contend, you simply are not engaged in research (although that doesn't mean that what you are doing is not valuable or useful).

 
Sharrock's insight:

#implications #motivation #research

 

Some education research is firmly rooted in the social sciences and qualitative research. Education research also benefits from clinical studies, statistics, and the sciences related to cognitive sciences.

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More Than Half of Students 'Engaged' in School, Says Poll

More Than Half of Students 'Engaged' in School, Says Poll | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A new report from Gallup Education shows just how powerful schools and teachers can be in motivating students to take an active role in the classroom.
Sharrock's insight:

This is more about engagement and motivation. Read carefully that this reports refers to school climate, learning, hope for the future, positive approaches, and passion.

 

excerpt: "Students who have teachers who make them “feel excited about the future” and who attend schools that they see as committed to building their individual strengths are 30 times more likely than other students to show other signs of engagement in the classroom—a key predictor of academic success, according to a report released Wednesday by Gallup Education."

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My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted

My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By Carolyn Coil, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Carolyn Coil is a speaker, educator and author. She works with teachers, administrators, parents and students, offering strategies for raising achievement, developing creative and critical thinking skills, motivating underachievers, differentiating...
Sharrock's insight:

part of my exploration of gifted student education. 

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Don't Screw Up Your Gamification Strategy

Don't Screw Up Your Gamification Strategy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Gamification is not just about adding games to work activities, but is the broader field of behavior analysis through loyalty and motivational techniques, measured and constantly fine-tuned to reward the right behaviors. - See more at: http://www.aiim.org/community/blogs/expert/Dont-Screw-Up-Your-Gamification-Strategy#sthash.8PSiH3GV.dpuf

Sharrock's insight:

A few broad tips and thoughts. The definition and context are valuable. We can adapt these ideas to education, educational environments, and activities. 

 

Important excerpt: "everyone loves the idea of automating systems to drive employee behavior, but few then understand what it takes to build out such a solution, maintain and monitor its progress, refine as needed, and then measure the benefits achieved. - See more at: http://www.aiim.org/community/blogs/expert/Dont-Screw-Up-Your-Gamification-Strategy#sthash.8PSiH3GV.dpuf

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Employee Motivation – Eight Easy Tips: Animated Single Slide

Employee Motivation – Eight Easy Tips: Animated Single Slide | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

 

 

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“DRiVE” Me Crazy! - Intrinsic Motivation and Behaviorist, Aubrey Daniels

“DRiVE” Me Crazy! - Intrinsic Motivation and Behaviorist, Aubrey Daniels | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

We are “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers” - ah, what?


In his new book, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, Dan Pink says that a new motivational operating system, what he calls Motivation 3.0, is needed for today’s business because what science has discovered is that people are “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers.”  - 

 

The book jacket says, “He (Pink) demonstrates that while carrots and sticks worked successfully in the twentieth century, that’s precisely the wrong way to motivate people for today’s challenges.”

 

These kinds of statements drive me crazy.  What does “intrinsically motivated purpose maximizers” mean?  Did “carrot and stick” ever really work?

 

...Is it true that people in the caveman era were not creative? I am sure that the caveman of the television ads, “So easy a caveman can do it” fame would be offended.  Imagine the ‘thinking outside the box’ caveman who came upon the act of fire starting, and then repeated until finally controlling fire.  

 

- See more at: http://aubreydaniels.com/blog/2010/01/26/drive-me-crazy/#sthash.TtBSG3YX.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 29, 2013 4:47 PM

I listened to a Dan Pink interview for the WBECS (World Business Executive Coaching Summit) conference and agree with Aubrey Daniel's assessment, even tho' I'm not much of a behaviorist.  See if you agree.

Sharrock's comment, May 8, 2014 10:10 AM
I'm having the same crazed frustration! Gamification is taking on the non-duality of motivation, and some researchers are questioning the validity of the so-called research supporting the duality and the idea the extrinsics diminish intrinsic motivation. Meanwhile, the Greek philosophers have explored hedonism (as motivation--not the resort) and philosophers have focused attention and thought on what motivates.