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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Just Say No

Just Say No | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

In a new book, leadership expert Ira Chaleff argues teaching employees to disobey orders is an essential management safeguard. Rather, we can short-circuit the ingrained habit of employees to automatically obey orders by teaching them to follow a formula that Chaleff distills as: Understand the mission of the organization, the goals of your activities, and the values that are supposed to govern how you achieve those goals;

 If you receive an order that seems to violate the mission, goals, or values, ask for clarification. Then, further evaluate the order to determine the source of the problem (whether it involves safety, legality, morality, etc.); Consciously decide whether to obey the order or whether to resist it and offer an acceptable alternative if possible; and Assume personal accountability for whichever choice you make.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
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How to fire people with dignity

How to fire people with dignity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In an excerpt from It Takes More than Casual Fridays and Free Coffee, Diane K. Adams shows you how to ease the pain of the firing process.
Sharrock's insight:

Great movie that explores this issue: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty with Ben Stiller (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Secret_Life_of_Walter_Mitty_(2013_film).

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Creativity and the Role of the Leader

Creativity and the Role of the Leader | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Your organization could use a bigger dose of creativity. Here’s what to do about it.

 

If you’re trying to enhance creativity…

…remember that you are not the sole fount of ideas.

Be the appreciative audience.

Ask the inspiring questions.

Allow ideas to bubble up from the workforce.

…enable collaboration.

Combat the lone inventor myth.

Define “superstar” as someone who helps others succeed.

Use “coordination totems”—metaphors, analogies, and stories—to help teams conceptualize together.

…enhance diversity.

Get people with different backgrounds and expertise to work together.

Encourage individuals to gain diverse experiences that will increase their creativity.

Open up the organization to outside creative contributors.

…map the stages of creativity and tend to their different needs.

Avoid process management in the fuzzy front end.

Provide sufficient time and resources for exploration.

Manage the handoff to commercialization.

…accept the inevitability and utility of failure.

Create psychological safety to maximize learning from failure.

Recognize the different kinds of failure and how they can be useful.

Create good mechanisms for filtering ideas and killing dead-end projects.

…motivate with intellectual challenge.

Protect the front end from commercial pressure.

Clear paths through the bureaucracy for creative ideas.

Let people do “good work.”

Show the higher purpose of projects whenever possible.

Grant as much independence as possible.

http://www.creativeleader.com/qualties-of-visionary-leaders/

Sharrock's insight:

http://www.creativeleader.com/qualties-of-visionary-leaders/

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Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies

Coping with Stress and Types of Burnout: Explanatory Power of Different Coping Strategies | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Policies and interventions to promote mental health should be designed to effectively involve the work environment and process as a key arena for action [1]. The majority of people in developed and developing countries now live in cities and are formally or informally linked to workplaces where most of their productive lives are spent [2]. Studies have shown the importance of work stressors both in the generation and prevention of mental disorders [3], but there is still a lack of policies and interventions that effectively improve workers’ mental health and prevent disorders. Interestingly, even among mental health workers, work-related mental disorders are highly prevalent [4]. Thus, work environments and processes are key elements in public health.

Burnout syndrome is an important work-related disorder of psychosocial origin, caused when stressful working conditions are endured. Its presence has been associated with a worsened self-perception of health and a large amount of somatic comorbidity [5]. Burnout has traditionally been described as a relatively uniform entity in all individuals, with more or less consistent aetiology and symptoms [6]. According to the classical definition, this syndrome includes the dimensions of exhaustion, cynicism and professional inefficacy [7], [8]. ‘Exhaustion’ is the feeling of not being able to offer any more of oneself at an emotional level; ‘cynicism’ represents a distant attitude towards work, those served by it, and colleagues; and ‘inefficacy’ is the feeling of not performing tasks adequately or being incompetent at work. These dimensions are strongly associated with each other, providing a unitary although three-dimensional definition of burnout [9].

Nevertheless, different burnout types have been proposed, according to the degree of dedication at work [10]. The ‘frenetic’ burnout type works increasingly harder, to the point of exhaustion, in search of success, and presents involvement, ambition and overload. The ‘under-challenged’ type has to cope with monotonous and unstimulating conditions that fail to provide satisfaction and feels indifference, boredom and lack of personal development. The ‘worn-out’ type gives up when faced with stress or the absence of gratification and shows lack of control, lack of acknowledgement and neglect [11], [12]. The dimensions of overload, lack of development and neglect, belonging to the frenetic, under-challenged and worn-out subtypes, respectively, comprise a definition of burnout that comes close to the standard perspective [9], [13]. ‘Overload’ refers to individuals’ feeling of risking health and personal life in the pursuit of good results and is significantly associated with exhaustion; ‘lack of development’ refers to the absence of personal growth experiences for individuals together with their desire to take on other jobs where they can better develop their skills and is markedly associated with cynicism; ‘neglect’ refers to individuals’ disregard as a response to any difficulty and is strongly associated with inefficacy [13], [14]. While approaching the standard definition, the dimensions referred to in the typological model show little relation to each other, which allows a differential characterisation of the syndrome to be made by means of clinical profiles [13].

In general, ‘burnout’ is a subject’s response to chronic work-related stress and is an attempt to adapt to or protect oneself from it [15]. Stress has been defined as the result of a relationship with the environment that the person appraises as significant for his or her well-being, and in which demands tax or exceed available coping resources. Coping is defined as cognitive and behavioural efforts to manage specific internal and/or external demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the person’s resources [10], [16]. A person will be psychologically vulnerable to a particular situation if he or she does not possess sufficient coping resources to handle it adequately and places considerable importance on the threat implicit in the consequences of this inadequate handling. There are different general trends in coping with stress, such as cognitive or behavioural coping, cognitive or behavioural avoidance, emotion-focused coping or substance use [17]–[19]. From this perspective, burnout may be observed as a progressively developed condition resulting from the use of the ineffective coping strategies with which professionals try to protect themselves from work-related stress situations [20].

There is an accumulation of evidence linking coping styles with stress and burnout. At first, coping style was studied as a relatively stable characteristic of the person, regardless of the nature of the task or situation, showing that certain inflexible coping styles could be associated with higher levels of stress [21], [22]. Subsequently, the emphasis was placed on the relationship between the coping style and the situation [16]. Early research seemed to support the idea that problem-focused coping was a better strategy than emotion-focused coping for stress management. However, it was later found that there were sub-factors that did not allow the application of such a general conclusion [23]. Problem-focused coping is not an appropriate strategy to address stress if the situation is uncontrollable or chronic [24], as it could lead, in this case, to a progressive process of behavioural disengagement [25]. Emotional coping has been noted to be detrimental if it involves distancing, avoidance or denial regarding the situation but is an effective strategy if it involves a positive reappraisal [26], [27]. In the long term, the key factor for developing the burnout syndrome seems to be the degree of passivity that the subject acquires [19], [28], [29].

So far, possible relationships between burnout types and coping strategies have not been explored. A better knowledge of the coping strategies associated with each burnout profile could promote the development of specific treatments and preventive programmes for the syndrome that might potentially be more effective [26]. In this context, the aim of this work was to estimate the explanatory power of the different styles of coping with stress on the development of different burnout subtypes, evaluating the contribution of specific coping strategies. In general terms, the hypotheses were established according to the degree of dedication at work shown by the different burnout subtypes. The frenetic burnout subtype is a highly dedicated profile, which means that the related overload could be associated with active coping strategies, such as those included in problem-focused coping. The under-challenged burnout subtype is a profile characterised by an intermediate dedication to work, meaning that the related lack of development could be associated with avoidance coping strategies. The worn-out burnout subtype is a profile characterised by a low level of dedication, meaning that the associated neglect could be due to a behavioural impairment related to the use of disengagement strategies. In essence, this grading of the levels of dedication could be pointing to different stages in the longitudinal development of the syndrome. Different coping strategies for stress could be contributing to each of these [10], [12].
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Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements

Guide to Creating Mission & Vision Statements | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The second installment in this series centers around creating mission and vision statements. These principles hold true not only to those looking to create or evaluate a mission and vision statement for a volunteer program but for any other place were they are used.
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Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness

Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic than Toughness | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How should we react when an employee is not performing well or makes a mistake? How to respond when an employee messes up.

Via donhornsby, Roger Francis, Lynnette Van Dyke
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 11, 10:48 AM

(From the article): When trust, loyalty, and creativity are high, and stress is low, employees are happier and more productive and turnover is lower. Positive interactions even make employees healthier and require fewer sick days. Other studies have shown how compassionate management leads to improvements in customer service and client outcomes and satisfaction.

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The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity

The Best Kept Secret to Phenomenal Productivity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Kim Cameron and his colleagues at the University of Michigan, however, have discovered a way to improve performance that has nothing to do with dishing out benefits or deploying new processes. In a research article published in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Cameron and his coauthors found that a workplace characterized by positive and virtuous practices excels in a number of domains.
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Why Big Organizations Are Broken | Digital Tonto

Why Big Organizations Are Broken | Digital Tonto | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Everybody would like to think more about the long term, but unless you can solve everyday problems, you’ll never get there. However, control is an illusion and always has been.  When large organizations had a monopoly on resources, it was a workable fiction.  It no longer is.
Sharrock's insight:

This brings together some interesting ideas. The quote itself says that the old style of leadership is outdated because resources were monopolized objects that people couldn't access or manipulate without permission. Information and access is not controlled easily. The information age of the knowledge era requires high levels of transparency, collaboration, and communication so that problems can be discovered and solved. This requires a different kind of leadership that rejects formal authority, instead valuing informal authority. There are other ideas to consider connected with this article and regarding leadership in general. For one, there is the question about authority as an expert, how power is derived from authority (or vice versa), and the fluidity of leadership as it directs power towards greater effectiveness.

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Goal Tree as vehicle for change management

Goal Tree as vehicle for change management | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Building a Goal Tree with lower level employees take them on board, involve them and help embrace change. If you are not familiar with Goal Trees you may read this introduction to the tool first Qu...

Via Jürgen Kanz
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School suspends boy for alleged Hobbit Ring invisibility threats - CNET

School suspends boy for alleged Hobbit Ring invisibility threats - CNET | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Technically Incorrect: In Texas, they do not take kindly, it seems, to fantasy threats from 9-year-olds. In this case, Aiden Steward allegedly threatened another child that he could make them disappear with his One Ring.
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Don’t Ask for New Ideas If You’re Not Ready to Act on Them

Don’t Ask for New Ideas If You’re Not Ready to Act on Them | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Companies that focus on innovation often worry about how to encourage people to contribute ideas. But what happens when you ask people to participate in an innovation effort, and then get flooded with too many suggestions?
Sharrock's insight:

This is one of the big responsibilities of leadership: say what you mean and mean what you say. Asking for ideas but not acting on them can translate unfavorably on one's credibility. ..even if there are good reasons for not acting on some of the ideas. Leaders have to find ways to communicate their misgivings or lack of time/resources in ways that contributors can understand. Hopefully, the explanations don't derail future contribution requests. 

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How to Handle Stress in the Moment

How to Handle Stress in the Moment | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Silence the negative voice in your head.

Via Eileen Easterly
Sharrock's insight:

attn School leaders

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Eileen Easterly's curator insight, January 22, 9:44 AM

We often get tips on how to handle stress -- in the future -- but what do you do when it's happening right now? This article helps give you some solid ideas of how to handle stress at work while you are feeling it the most!

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How Much Does Height Matter In Career Success?

How Much Does Height Matter In Career Success? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
success has more to do with our ability to be bold enough to be proactive, to think and act differently, and to step up to the plate than is does with outside attributes.
Sharrock's insight:

I've read about these or similar height and success correlations before, but the deeper question was often: is it really the decision making of people who appreciate height in their leaders or does the height advantage give people more experiences and advantages that makes them EARN the acknowledgements? This article offers the complex response as "yes" to both questions, and supports these conclusions with clear, simple language.

 

I'm going to keep watching for posts from Shane Snow. Entertaining tidbits of info sprinkled in with a great storytelling skills. 

 

The takeaways are bold and clear as well. 

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Research Finds Leadership Quality is Barely Improving

Research Finds Leadership Quality is Barely Improving | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
25% of organisations report their leaders are not VUCA-capable.
The top 20% of organisations performing well financially are three times more likely to have VUCA-capable leaders than the bottom 20 percent.
15% of organisations rated their future bench strength as strong.
One in three organisations are focused on developing their leaders’ ability to foster innovation
One in five is emphasising development in global leadership.

Via Don Dea
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What The Pope Knows: The Power Of An Apology

What The Pope Knows: The Power Of An Apology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Francis’s words cast in sharp relief the nuttiness of this no-apology obsession.

First, he was frankly apologetic: “I humbly ask forgiveness, not only for the offenses of the church herself, but also for crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America.”
Sharrock's insight:

This article explores an issue I've been curious about. How does diplomacy and negotiations work with countries and other societies (organizations) that have existed for a long time? My main question has to do with history and culture versus their contemporary needs and interests. Who is the organization (society): its past leadership and actions or its present leadership and needs?

 

At the individual level, we are taught not to take responsibility for someone else's actions. How can you be sincere about being apologetic? It seems like a customer service tactic. 

 

However, when a family member does something wrong, don't you feel the need to apologize for that person--especially, if it's a son or daughter--but can also extend to actions of a spouse? 

 

Are we doing a disservice to individuals and leaders by holding them accountable for actions of others? Previous leaders? Previous economic situations? different eras? We might often state "If I knew then what I know now..." things would be different or would have gone differently. There is a sense that we could somehow do better with more information, yet look at the criticism of world leaders who regularly meet with committees and advisers and intelligence. Each nation's economy has changed from the past, each nation has its crimes against humanity, its genocidal history, its issues with poverty and starvation. Each nation also stages struggles between its leaders and the business classes and the impoverished. Instant information access has transformed politics everywhere. 

 

So, why are we still looking for apologies from people who weren't responsible for the insult(s)? Why do I suddenly want to know more about psychodrama? And more importantly, why are these apologies (sometimes) so powerful, cathartic? Why does acknowledgement of past wrongs, committed by an organization they weren't leading, mean anything?

 

This article suggests that there is something more going on. One, it's a sign that with the acknowledgement of past wrongdoings, a new era is beginning. It's like saying, yes, we did this due to bad policy and even worse decision making, but take this as a break from the past. We have a new approach and new philosophy. We are rebranding, so to speak. 

 

So many implications...

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The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up

The Best Employee Engagement Strategy Is From The Bottom Up | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
VideoSo what’s the right employee engagement strategy to dramatically increase engagement in your organization? Well let’s first talk about the wrong strategy... Usually, someone from HR has to convince the CEO to spend money on an employee survey. And when the results come back, the data is hoarded by the senior leadership [...]
Sharrock's insight:

There are devleopmental differences between adults and students (children), but there might be takeaways that educators might use in classrooms and schools.

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The 3 Kinds of Burnout

The 3 Kinds of Burnout | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
We typically think of “burnout” as the result of working too many hard, stressful hours. However, new research shows that burnouts actually come in three different types, and each requires a different strategy to fix.
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What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer

What does it take to change people's minds? | Game-Changer | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In his book “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion“, Jonathan Haidt, a social psychologist at New York University, observes that most of the moral reasoning people do is oriented not towards discovering the truth, but towards justifying their beliefs to others in their social group. “Moral reasoning is more like a politician seeking votes than a scientist seeking truth,” Mr Haidt writes. “We are obsessively concerned about what others think of us.” For the most part, people select their moral beliefs the way they select their clothes, asking themselves whether this or that opinion is appropriate to their identity and how it will look to their friends. When they do engage in moral reasoning, they do it to justify taking the position necessary to fit in. If people’s moral stances are shifting rapidly, it is because they are getting signals from others in their group that a different belief is now acceptable.
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Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition

Big Dog and Little Dog's Performance Juxtaposition | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A resource for human performance, leadership, learning, training, instructional design, and development.
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Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
By Abhijit Bhaduri and Bill Fischer Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors.

Via Alexander Crépin
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CIM Academy's curator insight, March 27, 6:44 AM

Times are changing and being a digital leader is now a key aspect of  achieving marketing success.

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Systems Thinking and The Learning Organisation - Success Feelosophy

Systems Thinking and The Learning Organisation - Success Feelosophy | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The complexity in all areas of life in the 21st century, especially in politics, business, public services and education means that people who have learnt the skills to become systems thinkers are invaluable, but they are in very short supply.

Via Jürgen Kanz
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Jan Rey's curator insight, February 24, 9:17 AM

Ludzi myślących systemowo brakuje, lecz wykorzystanie ich profesjonalnego podejścia w wielu organizacjach napotyka trudności.

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7 Qualities Servant-Leaders Expect From Others

7 Qualities Servant-Leaders Expect From Others | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Servant-leaders fail when they tolerate self-serving in others. Don’t be the only servant in the room. One-way service is naive, wasteful, and irresponsible.
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Former Linden-McKinley principal knowingly manipulated student data, hearing ... - Columbus Dispatch

Former Linden-McKinley principal knowingly manipulated student data, hearing ... - Columbus Dispatch | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The former Linden-McKinley STEM Academy principal cared for her students, but overwhelming evidence that she knowingly cheated gives the Columbus school board good reason to fire her, a hearing officer has ruled.
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We need less talk about innovation and more about mediocrity

We need less talk about innovation and more about mediocrity | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
  “The only way to get mediocre is one step at a time. But you don’t have to settle. It’s a choice you get to make every day.” - Seth Godin In my last post I named innovation as the most overused w...

Via Alexander Crépin
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We Still Don’t Know the Difference Between Change and Transformation

We Still Don’t Know the Difference Between Change and Transformation | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
And it keeps holding us back.

Via Grant Montgomery
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