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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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4 Characteristics Of Learning Leaders

4 Characteristics Of Learning Leaders | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
TEST 4 Characteristics Of A Learning Leader
by Stewart Hase, Heutagogy of Community Practice
Writing is always a learning experience for me. It forces greater clarity.

Via Kevreadenn
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The Death Of Expertise

The Death Of Expertise | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To reject the notion of expertise, and to replace it with a sanctimonious insistence that every person has a right to his or her own opinion, is silly.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.


In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman has also shared that experts fail at long terms predictions. They might get it right in the "short term", but people looking for sooth seers are expecting too much. 

 

Next, despite one's expertise, a great deal of research supports that algorithms and checklists are more reliable (refer to the work of Paul Meehl). That's partly because experts are human beings who, due to various biases and fallibility, take short cuts, fail to follow well established procedures, and will sometimes reject data to fall prey to halo effects and other cognitive biases. Experts are more effective with the help of checklists and algorithms, but are less effective, less acccurate, without them. 

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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 22, 2:50 PM

Tom Nichols explores how the extinction of gatekeepers (or at least their disappearance from public discourse) and the democratization of knowledge that comes with it has unleased some rather ugly beasts. Does this endanger thought leaders? The author puts forward a few 'rules of the road' for those of us who engage with experts.

 

Bonus: the Dunning-Kruger effect, a particular blend of overconfidence and incompetence. 

Sharrock's comment, January 22, 3:06 PM
There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.
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Reading Sage: Webb's Depth of Knowledge (DOK) | Bloom's Taxonomy vs. Norman Webb's depth of knowledge

The Common Core Standards are the cornerstones of the Smarter Balanced and PARCC assessments, Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (scale of cognitive demand) and Blooms Revised Taxonomy (levels of intellectual ability) are the framework and the structures that will be used to evaluate students. Assessing curriculum, developing formative assessments, evaluation curriculum, and evaluation of students knowledge at the highest levels is being shared by two progressive cognitive matrices. Depth of knowledge, and complexity of knowledge is the heart of the more rigorous assessments being implemented in 2014. They share many ideas and concepts yet are different in level of cognitive demand, level of difficulty, complexity of verbs vs. depth of thinking required, and the scale of cognitive demand. Teachers need to learn how the frameworks are used to develop curriculum and how to use them to enhance instructions. Teachers and students can use Blooms Questions Stems and Webb’s DOK questions stems to create higher order thinking and improve achievement. 80% of the PARCC assessments will be based on the highest levels of blooms and the deepest levels of Webb’s DOK. Are you ready to use the DOK or Blooms daily in your class? 

 The links below are a great resources of Blooms Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge.Levels of Thinking in Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of KnowledgeHess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix & Curricular Examples | Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy | Webb’s Depth of Knowledge GuideDepth of Knowledge: Assessing Curriculum with Depth and MeaningBlooms and Webb ComparisonDepth of Knowledge ConsistencyDeveloping Higher Order Thinking Questions Based on Webb’s DOK andFCAT Content ComplexityPARCC Transition Information: AIMS Test and Common CoreDOK Question StemsDepth of Knowledge (DOK) LevelsINTRODUCTION TO WEBB’S DEPTH-OF-KNOWLEDGE LEVELSMathematics Depth-of-Knowledge LevelsDepth-of-Knowledge Levels for Four Content Areas

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» Vision Through Darkness - World of Psychology

» Vision Through Darkness - World of Psychology | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
“Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see.” This is one of my favorite Dr. Martin Luther King quotes. It is remarkable, in
Sharrock's insight:

I wonder what is meant by the author who says that seeing a client as "physiology,parenting, brain function, or even an amalgam of these is never transformative, even when it is helpful." Is this more about a fixed-mindset lens? The first quote is powerful though: “Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see.” It speaks to me about symptoms but also about science itself. So often, we don't really understand causality and metaphysics; we only understand what we experience and such limited reflection on those experiences. Most of us don't know with certainty what fire is; we do know that it is hot and gives light; we know that it can spread. But why doesn't it form as a cloud or as spheres? We see the seasons--winter, spring, summer, fall--but do we really understand that the only cause of the seasons is our relationship to the sun? And what about the moon's phases? Do we really know the explanation? I saw a video presentation that documented that quite a few people don't know (I certainly didn't know, and I had truly believed that I did know). 


In education, this is even more evident. We don't know what theories of learning are most accurate. We don't know the specific resources in a students community, home, or school environment that might have led to a student's successes just like we don't really know the specific reasons for a student's apparent shortcomings. Even with data, there are too many variables we can't control or rule out. We APPROACH truth with answers we suggest, but there is always room for doubt. This is particularly true when trying to improve school attendance. 

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5 Ways to Get Up to Speed on Anything Fast

5 Ways to Get Up to Speed on Anything Fast | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
You can't constantly monitor every development in your industry, but a few techniques can greatly expedite getting the knowledge you need.
Sharrock's insight:

A good short article to remind us of the importance of face to face, in-person experiences. 

 

excerpt: "Data Is No Substitute For Real Experience

IBM Global Consulting interviewed 1,500 chief marketing officers to determine how they were adapting to a rapidly changing business climate. The findings? The vast majority were drowning in data. Most admitted they had no time to experience their organization from the outside in. They had too much information and not enough knowledge."

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10 Years of Silence: How long it took Mozart, Picasso and Kobe Bryant to be Successful

10 Years of Silence: How long it took Mozart, Picasso and Kobe Bryant to be Successful | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
How long does it take to become elite at your craft? And what do the people who master their goals do differently than the rest of us? That’s what John Hayes, a cognitive psychology professor at Carnegie Mellon University, wanted to know.

Via Ryan Hines
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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 20, 2:50 PM

I tend not to collect these types of articles but this one jumped out at me with its emphasis on focus and experience.

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What's a Blog Post Worth? - On Hiring - The Chronicle of Higher Education

What's a Blog Post Worth? - On Hiring - The Chronicle of Higher Education | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
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