School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Why Smart People Don't Get Hired

Why Smart People Don't Get Hired | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

"Smart people" (i.e, people with higher cognitive abilities) tend to actually be subject to a greater (cognitive) "bias blindspots". In other words, they are more prone to incorrectly trust their gut instincts (heuristics) when making decisions. As a result, they often make more mistakes of reasoning than the rest of us mortals. In particular, smart people tend to see bias more easily in others than in themselves.

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What We Have Learned About Gifted Children

What We Have Learned About Gifted Children | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The Gifted Development Center has been in operation since June, 1979, and we have assessed over 5,600 children in the last 30 years.  By concentrating totally on the gifted population, we have acquired a considerable amount of knowledge about the development of giftedness.  In 1994-1995, three noted researchers spent post-doctoral internships assisting us in coding our clinical data to enable statistical analysis:  Drs. Frank Falk and Nancy Miller of the University of Akron, and Dr. Karen Rogers of the University of St. Thomas.   Here are some of the highlights of what we have learned so far:

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

3. When parents fail to recognize a child’s gifts, teachers may overlook them as well.  Rita Dickinson (1970) found that half of the children she tested with IQs of 132 or above were referred for behavior problems and not seen as gifted by their teachers or parents.  Parent advocacy is critical for gifted children’s emotional and academic growth.  Associate Director, Bobbie Gilman’s (2008a) award-winning book, Academic Advocacy for Gifted Children: A Parent’s Complete Guide, can guide parents in effectively advocating for their children. Challenging Highly Gifted Learners (Gilman, 2008b) is an excellent book for teachers and parents."

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Top 10 Political Comedians

Top 10 Political Comedians | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Top 10 Political Comedians - Check out this list of the 10 best political stand-up comedians, from Bill Maher to Dennis Miller.

 

It might seem like political comedians have an easy job -- to take shots at leaders and bureaucrats for whom the public at large already have a healthy dose of cynical mistrust. But the best political comedians do more than take shots; they shape the discussion and become part of the process through the act of telling jokes. They can be more than simple commentators; they can be voices. Funny, funny voices.

Though the majority of political comedians do tend to lean left, there are those who speak to conservatives and others who elect not to choose sides. All are represented here, in varying numbers and degrees.

Sharrock's insight:

More celebrity comedians should be involved with social media influencing. Comedians as a profession have repeatedly clarified complex issues: politics, social customs/tendencies, business environments, competition, etc. We laugh because something said was devastatingly true or emotionally accurate. Also, Conan is a manager. He makes decisions under high-stress situations. He has to interact with writers, his producer(s), network executives. He's not on the "outside" looking in. He's just able to make money for his tv network, keep people employed, entertain an audience, while keeping his sense of humor.


But political comedians already influence us. We know Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Gary Trudeau (Doonesbury), Scott Adams (Dilbert), Bill Maher, and others listed here http://comedians.about.com/od/top10lists/tp/top10politicalcomedians.htm. There are others who are not listed at that link. Some of their influence only works from their chosen medium, but some of those listed are exceptionally capable of off-the-cuff, live, intellectual contributions that either create the news or they make people take action. For example, how often does a manager or supervisor use Dilbert comic strip to avoid becoming one of the characters depicted there? How often does a comic quote get used?

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Sara Kate MacFarland's curator insight, February 14, 2014 9:47 PM

George Carlin is the king of cynicism...

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What Gets in the Way of Listening

What Gets in the Way of Listening | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

As your role grows in scale and influence, so too must your ability to listen. But listening is one of the toughest skills to master — and requires uncovering deeper barriers within oneself.


While tactically there are many ways to strengthen your listening skills, you must focus on the deeper, internal issues at stake to really improve. Listening is a skill that enables you to align people, decisions, and agendas. You cannot have leadership presence without hearing what others have to say.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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daniel peled's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:07 AM

להקשיב...זה שם המשחק

Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 5, 2014 4:33 AM

This HBR blog post presents 4 Listening Skills necessary for good leadership. "You cannot have leadership presence without hearing what others have to say."

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Harvard study finds learning music doesn’t make you smarter - The Boston Globe

Harvard study finds learning music doesn’t make you smarter - The Boston Globe | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
True or false? Music makes you smarter. Contrary to popular belief, a study — led by a Harvard graduate student who plays the saxophone, flute, bassoon, oboe, and clarinet — found no cognitive benefits to music lessons.
Sharrock's insight:

Music lesson cognition increases are a myth. "Instead of intelligence, they looked at a broad suite of tests, including core mathematical abilities, spatial navigation, and linguistic abilities. The study found no evidence of benefit, although it cannot rule out that music might have cognitive benefits, or that perhaps more classes could have an effect."

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Sharrock's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:10 PM

Music lesson cognition increases are a myth. "Instead of intelligence, they looked at a broad suite of tests, including core mathematical abilities, spatial navigation, and linguistic abilities. The study found no evidence of benefit, although it cannot rule out that music might have cognitive benefits, or that perhaps more classes could have an effect."

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Human Intelligence: Map

An alphabetical interactive map, organized by time period, with links to biographical profiles of people who have influenced the development of intelligence theory and testing.
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TY! @drseide 4: Learning Strategies trump IQ in Predicting Achievement |, Scientific American

TY! @drseide 4: Learning Strategies trump IQ in Predicting Achievement |, Scientific American | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
In the 1960s, the legendary psychologist Albert Bandura rejected the view that learning is passive. Instead he emphasized the importance of the active use of learning strategies. ...

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:09 PM

There is so much data now that indicates the guided practice and learning staratagies we have offered in independent LD school matters and works!   --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"....Over the past few decades there have been multiple studies showing the effectiveness of the self-regulated learning strategies approach using a variety of methodologies (e.g., think-aloud protocols, diaries, observation). In one recent large review, John Dunlosky and colleagues evaluated the relative utility of ten learning strategies. While some of the learning strategies (e.g., highlighting, rereading) were found to have low utility in benefitting learning outcomes, the following strategies were assessed as having moderate to high utility: practice testing (high), distributed practice (high), elaborative interrogation (medium), self-explanation (medium), and interleaved practice (medium). Practice testing had the most evidence supporting its benefits for learning across context and over time...."

Brenda Elliott's curator insight, April 9, 2013 9:12 PM

Very interesting study- effective learning strategies more important than IQ in predicting achievement-

Sharrock's curator insight, September 30, 2014 11:32 AM
Lou Salza's insight:

There is so much data now that indicates the guided practice and learning staratagies we have offered in independent LD school matters and works!   --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"....Over the past few decades there have been multiple studies showing the effectiveness of the self-regulated learning strategies approach using a variety of methodologies (e.g., think-aloud protocols, diaries, observation). In one recent large review, John Dunlosky and colleagues evaluated the relative utility of ten learning strategies. While some of the learning strategies (e.g., highlighting, rereading) were found to have low utility in benefitting learning outcomes, the following strategies were assessed as having moderate to high utility: practice testing (high), distributed practice (high), elaborative interrogation (medium), self-explanation (medium), and interleaved practice (medium). Practice testing had the most evidence supporting its benefits for learning across context and over time...."