School Leadership...
Follow
Find tag "information"
1.4K views | +0 today
School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Truth about Exit Interviews

The Truth about Exit Interviews | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

I'm leaving my job mostly because of the crippling politics that have taken over since our division was spun off a year ago. I'm not the first person to leave, but my departure is a big enough deal that the VP of HR at our headquarters called our local HR person to tell her "Do a thorough exit interview with Joan. She's a high-visibility departure."

 

Sharrock's insight:

Great discussion topic here!!!!! A must read!

Also, great advice.

Extended excerpt: 

Here are ten of the millions of ways we can hear what our teammates have to tell us:

Start every staff meeting with the agenda item "How are we doing?"Make every training session a community-building and feedback session, too.Let the newcomers at New Employee Orientation meetings know that we value their input, and let them know all the ways to report an issue, inquire about something confusing, make a suggestion or just share an observation.Start every manager-employee one-on-one meeting with the question "Anything we should talk about job-satisfaction-wise? How's your workload?"Empower employees who are interested to get together at lunchtime and devise improvements in processes, ideas for creating Team Mojo in the group, and general environmental upgrades. Tell everybody else how to get a suggestion into that pipeline.Schedule small-group lunches with executives or large-group Town Hall Meetings where top leaders can share their plans and listen to ideas and questions from the team.Establish a telephone, email and text hotline where employees can confidentially share concerns about unsafe, unlawful or unethical situations.Station an HR person in the lunchroom once a week so that employees can get concerns or questions addressed and also share their feedback.Launch an internal communications forum where people can help one another with work-related and home-related questions. The more trust and community we build, the more likely we are to hear about it when something is broken.Send your senior leaders on a tour of the organization's department meetings, so that they can sit with each department and hear (and avidly ask for!) issues and questions from the employees.

It is easy to keep an ear to the ground -- we just have to care enough to do it. Your employer missed its chance to get your valuable counsel, and now it's buried deep in the vault.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports: Oakland County
Scoop.it!

Data Discussion

Data Discussion | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

How can teachers capitalize on data about student learning that are generated in their classrooms every day? How can this information best be collected and used to increase student learning? Making data part of instructional planning can be challenging, especially if teachers are not used to thinking about assessment and data as a regular part of the process.

Effective feedback  is a great way for teachers to use collected data in order to improve student learning.

Results from almost any assessment can be of great benefit to students, provided they are used to make instructional adjustments. And — the shorter the amount of time between assessment and adjustment — the more powerful its effect on learning. Just like a diet plan that sits on your desk…until you actually pick it up and DO something with it, it isn’t going to affect much!


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 8, 6:00 PM

How do you use data as a classroom teacher? 

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Media Richness Theory — Time Barrow

Media Richness Theory — Time Barrow | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Sharrock's insight:

More information but more focused exploration of options for the sharing of information (but somewhat more limited than the wikipedia images and exploration). Looking at the sharing of information less as communication and focusing on the sharing of information AS education, learning platforms/approaches can be added to the chart. One to one personalized instruction could be at the top of the chart while infographics might be placed at the bottom but next to the poster. 

more...
Sharrock's comment, February 8, 2013 6:23 PM
Both websites addressed this regarding education.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Technology Resources for K-12 Education
Scoop.it!

A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Wonderful Free Classroom Poster on Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Via Anna Hu
Sharrock's insight:

simple picture with many implications for health, security, safety, and education

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Statistics in the News
Scoop.it!

Student Loans Are a Big Problem. So Are Misleading Statistics - Motley Fool

Student Loans Are a Big Problem. So Are Misleading Statistics - Motley Fool | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Student Loans Are a Big Problem. So Are Misleading Statistics Motley Fool That's misleading, because the number of people attending college in America has surged from just more than 15 million in 2000 to 22 million in 2011, according to the...

Via Bill Bentley
more...
Bill Bentley's curator insight, January 4, 10:57 AM

This article isn't weird but it's well done and informative and helps to counteract some of the wildly misleading numbers quoted by irresponsible journalists and politicians.  It starts by showing some of those bad statistics.  Don't pass out, keep reading until the end.  It's not long.   If you or your kids are considering a college education, this analysis is well done.   Bill.

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Media richness theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Media richness theory, sometimes referred to as information richness theory, is a framework to describe a communications medium by its ability to reproduce the information sent over it. It was developed by Richard L. Daft and Robert H. Lengel, and is used to rank and evaluate the richness of certain communication mediums, such as phone calls, video conferencing, and email. For example, a phone call can not reproduce visual social cues such as gestures, so it is a less rich communication medium than video conferencing, which allows users to communicate gestures to some extent. Specifically, media richness theory states that the more ambiguous and uncertain a task is, the richer the format of media that suits it. Based on contingency theory and information processing theory, it explains that richer, personal communication means are generally more effective for communication of equivocal issues than leaner, less rich media.

Media richness theory was introduced in 1984 by Richard L. Daft and Robert H. Lengel. It was originally developed primarily to describe and evaluate communication mediums within organizations. It is based on information processing theory and how managers and organizations exchange information.[1] The goal of media richness theory is to cope with communication challenges facing organizations, such as unclear or confusing messages, or conflicting interpretations of messages.[2] Since it was first introduced, media richness theory has been a widely studied communication theory, and the original authors have written several additional articles on the topic, including a study in which they describe media richness and the ability to select appropriate media as an executive skill.[3]

Other communication scholars have tested the theory in order to improve it, and more recently media richness theory has been retroactively adapted to include new media communication mediums, such as improved video and online conferencing. Although media richness theory relates to media use, rather than media choice, empirical studies of the theory have often studied what medium a manager would chose to communicate over, and not the effects of media use.[4]

Sharrock's insight:

The media richness theory can help administrators relect on and choose media when there is a need to communicate to employees, parents, or other stakeholders. 

more...
No comment yet.