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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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The Death Of Expertise

The Death Of Expertise | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
To reject the notion of expertise, and to replace it with a sanctimonious insistence that every person has a right to his or her own opinion, is silly.

Via Ryan Hines
Sharrock's insight:

There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.


In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman has also shared that experts fail at long terms predictions. They might get it right in the "short term", but people looking for sooth seers are expecting too much. 

 

Next, despite one's expertise, a great deal of research supports that algorithms and checklists are more reliable (refer to the work of Paul Meehl). That's partly because experts are human beings who, due to various biases and fallibility, take short cuts, fail to follow well established procedures, and will sometimes reject data to fall prey to halo effects and other cognitive biases. Experts are more effective with the help of checklists and algorithms, but are less effective, less acccurate, without them. 

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Ryan Hines's curator insight, January 22, 2:50 PM

Tom Nichols explores how the extinction of gatekeepers (or at least their disappearance from public discourse) and the democratization of knowledge that comes with it has unleased some rather ugly beasts. Does this endanger thought leaders? The author puts forward a few 'rules of the road' for those of us who engage with experts.

 

Bonus: the Dunning-Kruger effect, a particular blend of overconfidence and incompetence. 

Sharrock's comment, January 22, 3:06 PM
There isn't so much a "death of expertise" as there is a greater drive for individuals to question the gatekeepers. Malcolm Gladwell explores this in with how people interact with their doctors and has found class differences. The knowledge era has been described by Michael Maccoby as having different kinds of social character: the interactive social character. And in this era, employees usually have more expertise than their supervisors do. The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that can also come into play, but there are also new messages coming from the very experts that are mentioned as "dying"--influencers share stories about the limitations of organizational capacity and cultures. There are trade-offs for hiring an expert from outside of the organization, they explain to varying degrees. Then there is the drive for transformative leadership (or servant leadership paradigms) towards transparency, communication, and collaboration.
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What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating

What Makes Malcolm Gladwell Fascinating | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Challenging our assumptions is what Malcolm Gladwell does best. To see how he does it, let’s take a look at what Davis called The Index of the Interesting. Davis classified 12 different ways of challenging conventional wisdom, and Gladwell’s key ideas map beautifully onto at least five of them.

Sharrock's insight:

These five key ideas are helpful when exploring concepts and research. The author's analysis also helps me consider ways to improve my wriring.

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How people argue with research they don’t like

How people argue with research they don’t like | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If you ever need to rebut a study whose conclusion you don't like, just follow this simple flowchart.
Sharrock's insight:

Great responses. Great flowchart. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:35 PM

Research results always have to be taken with a grain of salt.