School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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How to Build Thick Skin and Stop Being So Sensitive

How to Build Thick Skin and Stop Being So Sensitive | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Check out these important tips for building thick skin in your life - and stop feeling so easily threatened and offended by what people say or do.
Sharrock's insight:

Offers good suggestions for building a "thicker skin."

 

excerpt: "Clearly, there are many benefits to being a HSP. They can often connect with others easily and be more kind and understanding toward everyone, as well as more introspective and creative.

However, sometimes this high sensitivity can also become tiresome, unhealthy, and counterproductive."

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Gallup-EdWeek Poll: What Superintendents Really Think

Gallup-EdWeek Poll: What Superintendents Really Think | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
District leaders share their views on common standards, budget cuts, staff development, and other key education issues in these first results from a new ongoing survey.
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Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking

Lessons Learned -- Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
quotYou never learn by doing something right cause you already know how to do it. You only learn from making mistakes and correcting them.quotRussell...
Sharrock's insight:

from the article: "Each of systems thinking’s various manifestations demands some degree of subscription to an orthodoxy (a particular view of just what systems thinking is). And each requires that the user master a large number of related ideas and techniques, most of which are not particularly useful on their own."

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Core Withdrawal? | Scholastic.com

Core Withdrawal? | Scholastic.com | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Some states seem to be reconsidering their Common Core commitments.
Sharrock's insight:

Reasons given for the growing group of activists pushing back against the Common Core. (from the article)

1. “Top-down” Adoption
On both the right and left, some oppose the top-down, elitist way in which the new standards were adopted,” says Bob Schaeffer, public education director at FairTest, the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. “The initial wave of acceptance was fueled by a strong promotional campaign coupled with federal government incentives. To prevent rollback, proponents will have to show that the Core is somehow different than the previous remedies for the nation’s educational problems.”

2. Testing Overload 
The Common Core involves competency-based, or on-demand, testing, which proponents say will build more accountability into the system and give a truer picture of students’ actual learning. Opponents say more testing is not the answer. “Many new tests will be required without an appreciable improvement.… The two consortiums designing Common Core tests must demonstrate the increase in the number of exams … will improve school quality, not further undermine it,” Schaeffer says.

3. Incomplete Resources 
Some opponents may not disagree with the fundamental reasoning behind Common Core adoption. But they say their states or districts lack the necessary resources to meet the Core’s rapid implementation schedule, including developing the new teaching materials and tests and the infrastructure to support them.

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The Myth Of The Moron CEO

The Myth Of The Moron CEO | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

"...if we’re are going to vilify them we should at least get the story straight.  Too often we don’t. And that’s a problem."--Greg Satell

Sharrock's insight:

What is going on here? "There are other problems with Mr. Hartung’s analysis as well.  He uses stock performance over arbitrary periods (the pre-crisis period of 2000/2001 seems to be a favorite benchmark) and doesn’t index to market or industry factors.  Mostly, his criticism seems to stem from the fact that these CEO’s do things differently than he would." Although this treatment focuses on Hartung's analysis of CEO performance, it also serves to bring attention to how we assess leaders in general. There are benchmarks that are right on, but others are questionable. 

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The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz

The American Scholar: Solitude and Leadership - William Deresiewicz | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts
Sharrock's insight:

After reading this speech once, I realize these are the words I would have read to my past self in high school and again during my first days in college, and then again at the end of college at graduation. I would try to read them to my children at their different points in life (in person or as a digital avatar). There are powerful messages in this lecture delivered at West Point. He talks about leadership and what it means to be a leader, but he also explains how leadership and isolation play off of each other. He talks about how true leadership can be lonely and isolating, but also how loneliness and isolation can help you to become a better leader, a better thinker, a better human being. These include the abilities of a true leader: The ability to speak your mind even when you know what you are sharing is not held by the majority of those you are addressing; the ability to think critically, skeptically, and to adjust your perspectives to test and validate (or invalidate) a position, a solution, and even the questions asked of a problem, is valuable and rare. Maybe it's valuable because it's so rare. Or maybe it's so valuable because it isn't often appreciated at the time, like a work of great art or an invention that can't be commercialized. My favorite point was when he said, “So it’s perfectly natural to have doubts, or questions, or even just difficulties. The question is, what do you do with them? Do you suppress them, do you distract yourself from them, do you pretend they don’t exist? Or do you confront them directly, honestly, courageously? If you decide to do so, you will find that the answers to these dilemmas are not to be found on Twitter or Comedy Central or even in The New York Times. They can only be found within—without distractions, without peer pressure, in solitude.”

 

I don't agree that there is no leadership in many areas, many departments. I don't know how the author/speaker has come to those conclusions, considering his experiences and intelligence. Usually, people think they are being profound when they say there are no leaders, no poets, no great artists, etc. It's actually a sign that they lack imagination or real experience leading or creating. It's like saying we need to end poverty or hunger; saying it as if no body is trying to achieve these goals. Meanwhile, there are organizations plugging away, resisting, innovating, reaching, and achieving these goals...but at lower levels, lower numbers, temporarily. But he is not that guy. So, I value his speech and his ultimate points and reasoning and advice, but disagree on some points.

 

But leadership has changed, which is often unappreciated often. The “boss” is becoming ineffective. How do people realize that 21st century learning rejects lecturing and “top down” command structure and the “sage on the stage” but think leaders should still lecture and command from up-high? What is leadership in a world of complexity? Authority has changed. Hierarchies are collapsing, becoming lattices and noded-networks. Power and warfare include informality (informal power) and unorthodoxy (innovative).  Temporary teams focus on short term projects and objectives.

The more informed, intelligent, and experienced commentator should explain how leadership has changed. But that’s not what complainers do. They don’t talk about complexity, complications, and wicked problems. They sound like apologists. They appear weak and confused and bureaucratic. The eyes of the audience will go glassy. But what do we know about leadership from Star Trek? Was Captain Kirk a better leader than Jean Luc Picard? How do you evaluate Mission Impossible of today? I wonder if people still want Clint Eastwood types. In the Game of Thrones, we are introduced to different kinds of leaders and different kinds of heroes. I wonder who is best, most heroic, and more effective at leading.

We say we want better problem solving, and say that this comes from thinking critically, communicating and collaborating. And we know solutions result best from all of this with reflection and more critical thinking. But what about time? How much time is given and how much time must be taken? 

 

The lecturer redeems himself by saying this: “I find for myself that my first thought is never my best thought. My first thought is always someone else’s; it’s always what I’ve already heard about the subject, always the conventional wisdom. It’s only by concentrating, sticking to the question, being patient, letting all the parts of my mind come into play, that I arrive at an original idea. By giving my brain a chance to make associations, draw connections, take me by surprise. And often even that idea doesn’t turn out to be very good. I need time to think about it, too, to make mistakes and recognize them, to make false starts and correct them, to outlast my impulses, to defeat my desire to declare the job done and move on to the next thing.”

 

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Principal: Why our new educator evaluation system is unethical - Washington Post - Washington Post (blog)

Principal: Why our new educator evaluation system is unethical - Washington Post - Washington Post (blog) | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Principal: Why our new educator evaluation system is unethical - Washington Post Washington Post (blog) regents Here's a new post from award-winning Principal Carol Burris of South Side High School in New York about the state's controversial new...
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Sir Ken Robinson: Alternative Education is Good Education

Sir Ken Robinson: Alternative Education is Good Education | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=GnvkitAFwlM In 2006, Sir Ken Robinson presented a TED talk about the importance of nurturing creat

Via Tara Johnson
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