School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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Understanding and Managing Conflict Styles

In order to manage workplace conflict, it’s important to understand and adjust to each situation and to the preferred conflict style of those involved. Understanding your own preferred conflict style and the preferred conflict style of others can really help take some emotion and some personalization out of the conflict. When we understand conflict styles, we hopefully will stop thinking in terms of “I’m right and he’s wrong,” and take the actions of others less personally. Then we can use the energy we’d normally waste on trying to figure them out to creatively resolve the underlying issues of the dispute. We can also consciously choose to use a different conflict style when the situation demands it. But this takes practice to use a style that perhaps isn’t as comfortable for you as your preferred style.


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Miftachul Aristy's curator insight, December 30, 2015 4:05 AM

 Ketika Anda mempunyai banyak keinginan, maka libatkan banyak tindakan.

http://caramengobatiambeien.net/

Miftachul Aristy's curator insight, December 30, 2015 4:15 AM

Bangun pagi adalah tanda bahwa anda bisa mencapai tujuan hidup lebih baik dari kemarin.

http://caramengobatiambeien.net/

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Responding to Accusations

Responding to Accusations | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Kerry Patterson is author of three bestselling books, Influencer, Crucial Conversations, and Crucial Confrontations. READ MORE   Dear Crucial Skills, I read Crucial Conversati...
Sharrock's insight:

A reader shared this: "I still have a hard time dealing with accusations. The problem is that the first instinct when someone accuses you is to restore safety or use contrasting to solve the misunderstanding, but the accuser does not seem to be affected by those actions. Instead, they continue to draw incorrect conclusions about you or something you did. I’m sure a lot of people experience this same issue. What am I missing here and what is the best way to reply to someone who wrongly accuses you?"

Struggling with Accusations

The response is linked. But how do you respond to accusations that are based on incorrect conclusions? (These accusations can come from parents, colleagues, supervisors, etc.) How skilled are you at self-regulation, at addressing the accusation, and/or the accuser?

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