School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
Curated by Sharrock
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Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core!

Better Standardized Testing (Myths and Falsehoods) | Cognitive Rigor to the Core! | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Argument: Testing doesn't assess everything a child needs to learn!

This argument is a form of the Nirvana fallacy, where an idea is rejected because it doesn't provide a perfect solution to a problem or fails to meet every single criterion for effectiveness. No matter how well a test is designed, it will never capture all of the factors needed for students to succeed. 
Sharrock's insight:

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 8, 2015 7:18 PM

Walkup raises important points that points back to the need for others to evaluate our thinking and actions. We are human, so we can't be perfect. The most obvious of our imperfections is captured by the endless list of fallacies and biases. In the end, only (mostly) the most mentally ill will see herself as the bad guy in her life story. No matter what we do, we have rationales or rationalizations. Even when we're wrong, we can only mostly see our errors in retrospect. (To experience this, try editing your own writing then hand it over to someone else to edit.Then compare the editing suggestions.) 

 

On the other hand, we also need to trust and respect our evaluators. This is something that standardized testing--based on how they are constructed--can provide based on objectivity and sample sizes. And we all believe in testing. "When a calculus teacher assesses her students on Taylor series expansions, she knows fully well that her assessment will fail to capture many of the personal traits needed to be a successful mathematician. Yet, she still assigns the test."

 "Standardized testing is no different. Results of standardized testing are limited to uncovering gaps in basic concepts/skills acquisition. We should acknowledge as such."  

This is better than depending on the opinionated colleague down the hall who finds success certain ways that fits his personality, but doesn't fit well for anyone else. 

Rescooped by Sharrock from Leadership, Toxic Leadership, and Systems Thinking
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5 Essential Skills for Successful Coaching

5 Essential Skills for Successful Coaching | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
A big part of coaching is being a good listener--and not everyone knows how to be one.
As we argued in one of our previous columns, coaching has become an essential component of leadership in the work place.

Via george_reed
Sharrock's insight:

How does this apply to Cognitive Coaching? What are the distinctions?

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26 Keys to Student Engagement

26 Keys to Student Engagement | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

When we show kids our zeal and passion for what we believe in, we welcome them to share their own. Love what you do, and present it with zeal everyday! Even if it is the 100th time you have presented it, remember it is the first for these students!


Via Brad Merrick
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Brad Merrick's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:20 AM
Very clever and well considered article on the 26 keys to student engagement. Love the use of the Alphabet as the acronym.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Instructional Coaching
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Four Conditions Essential for Instructional Coaching to Work | Edutopia

Blogger and former teacher Elena Aguilar describes four conditions she considers essential in order for instructional coaching to work at a school.

Via KathyPerret
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