School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center

The Learning Analyst | TC Media Center | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

Baker and TC faculty colleagues focus on the exploding field of educational data mining (EDM), which uses advanced computer technologies to sift through huge amounts of data generated by intelligent tutoring systems and other online learning environments for information on how learners behave.  As Baker detailed in his MOOC, data mining – already a staple of the medical, financial services and retail worlds – can reveal why an individual student is getting the wrong answers to a subtraction problem; guide a teacher on how to make the best use of classroom time by pinpointing which homework problem stumped the most students the night before; and tell a superintendent which science curriculum is proving most effective with students across the district.    

 

These are issues that Baker, Associate Professor of Cognitive Studies, has won international recognition for probing.  At 36, he has published more than 150 peer-reviewed papers on the use of EDM that range from assessing boredom and cheating among students who use online tutoring systems to the mining of educational data to better understand metacognition, motivation and self-regulated learning. His ultimate focus is on creating computer-based environments in which users learn because they are genuinely engaged in their work. 

 
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: 

While he has only just begun to look at the data on his own MOOC, Baker is ready to share some anecdotal evidence about the efficacy of MOOC instruction.  Among his observations:

MOOCs are an excellent vehicle for introductory material. Many introductory courses are given by teaching assistants relatively new to teaching. By contrast, MOOC lecturers have to be subject matter experts who carefully hone their lectures and continuously work to improve them.MOOCs fill an educational void when subjects are locally unavailable. Programs in educational data mining, for example, existed in about five cities worldwide before Baker made his course available to anybody with a computer and Internet connection.MOOCs can be a vessel to interest students in more formal education programs, such as TC’s Masters in Cognitive Studies in Education (Focus in Learning Analytics) in the Department of Human Development.

The big question, of course, concerns how MOOC instruction compares with in-classroom learning. Baker takes a measured approach. He thinks MOOCs in their current state will not dominate education partly because of enrollment fall-off rates, but also because MOOCs have been made into an educational hybrid. The lectures, Baker says, are “mostly pretty good,” while homework assignments are not yet as effective.  Baker cautions against making the MOOC all things to all people.

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The 6 biggest MOOC stories of 2013 so far

The 6 biggest MOOC stories of 2013 so far | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Online learning companies have increased their funding and their reach, but not without bumps in the road. 
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