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Why Trust is the New Core of Leadership - Forbes

Why Trust is the New Core of Leadership - Forbes | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Not long ago, most discussions of leadership were about leaders – their personality traits, how to identify and groom those with ‘leadership potential,’ and what were the skills that leaders employed.

Via Maria Rachelle, Katherine Bryant, Wise Leader™, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Ivon Prefontaine
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Zian Peak's curator insight, May 6, 10:49 AM

I dont believe it's the new core, it's been there all along, perhaps we are only just taking notice. Do you agree?

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, June 1, 8:37 AM

Collaboration and Shared Leadership are the norm in schools today. At the base of success with these tools is trust.

Mercedes Jahn's curator insight, June 1, 11:06 AM

Trust is the invisible and powerful  life "glue" 

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Book Review: I'm in the Principal's Seat, Now What?

Book Review: I'm in the Principal's Seat, Now What? | school improvement process | Scoop.it
This book describes how team-building and relationships enable student achievement and teacher effectiveness.
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The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist

The Benefits of Looking on the Bright Side: 10 Reasons to Think Like an Optimist | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Research shows that thinking like an optimist pays off big—not just when it comes to your salary, but for your health, relationships, and your overall well-being.

Via Barb Jemmott, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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donhornsby's curator insight, November 13, 7:45 AM
(From the article): Optimists Have Happier 9 to 5s

People who see a glass that's half full tend to rate their jobs as more satisfying than those who don't. A study from Kuwait University found that people who were the most optimistic were also happiest in their jobs and had the fewest work complaints; the opposite was true for pessimists.

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10 ways to transform the way we do education

10 ways to transform the way we do education | school improvement process | Scoop.it

So, let's start transforming... the world needs you.


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A Principal's Reflections: Sustaining Outdated Practices Will Not Transform Schools

A Principal's Reflections: Sustaining Outdated Practices Will Not Transform Schools | school improvement process | Scoop.it

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(What) Do Americans really think about education?

(What) Do Americans really think about education? | school improvement process | Scoop.it

A number of polls from major news organizations, education groups, and universities have been commissioned over the past several months, and education pundits and advocates on all sides of current reform debates have endlessly parsed the results.  Unfortunately these pundits are mostly misguided, and public opinion polls on education don’t mean what people think they mean. What follows are three conclusions, all based on data from these various polls, and a discussion of they ought to mean for education policy and advocacy going forward.


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Information 'forms and informs' opinions. The education profession needs to do provide 'the information' on the issues.

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7 Traits That Make A Leader

7 Traits That Make A Leader | school improvement process | Scoop.it

Successful leadership, like happiness, is one of those things that everyone claims to have the "secret" to. There are more than 27,000 leadership books on Amazon, thousands of seminars on leadership skills held in conference rooms across the country, and countless articles in business magazines and websites pruning leadership lessons from CEOs and corporate movers and shakers. 

But leadership isn't just about sitting at the top of the corporate ladder and running the show -- it's a way of engaging with your social network, community, colleagues and employees to share a vision and unite people in pursuit of a common goal. Good leadership brings out the best individual qualities of everyone participating.


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Avoid These 8 Mistakes as a New Leader

Avoid These 8 Mistakes as a New Leader | school improvement process | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for new leaders to make mistakes but most can be avoided.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 13, 10:05 PM

New School managers should post this and read it daily.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The Art of Moving On

The Art of Moving On | school improvement process | Scoop.it
We all experience disappointments at work. Passed over for a promotion. Argument with a client or colleague. Office politics run amok. As a leader, your colleagues may see you as the cause of their

Via Sandeep Gautam, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, October 9, 3:44 AM

after any episode causing grief- like voluntary/forced separation from a team/ company etc; its necessary to  re-bond, reconnect, heal, forgive, come to terms with and move on:-)

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 9, 2:01 PM

Being ready to move on is essential. When I left teaching, it was the right time. I was able to let go. I miss the classroom, but not the micro-managing, the lack of integrity, the adult politics, etc. that went on. There was little choice in my professional development. School is a fiefdom operating under the dictates of those furthest removed from classrooms. That I was happy to shed myself of and was ready to do so without bitterness or rancour. Sadness was there, because I know children need something different than what is happening.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Catherine McAnally's curator insight, October 13, 6:13 PM

It's necessary to reconnect after a disappointment.

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What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds

What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds | school improvement process | Scoop.it

"As we seek to refine and reform today’s system of education, we would do well to ask, 'What is education?' Our answers may provide insights that get to the heart of what matters for 21st century children and adults alike. It is important to step back from divisive debates on grades, standardized testing, and teacher evaluation—and really look at the meaning of education. So I decided to do just that—to research the answer to this straightforward, yet complex question. Looking for wisdom from some of the greatest philosophers, poets, educators, historians, theologians, politicians, and world leaders, I found answers that should not only exist in our history books, but also remain at the core of current education dialogue. In my work as a developmental psychologist, I constantly struggle to balance the goals of formal education with the goals of raising healthy, happy children who grow to become contributing members of families and society. Along with academic skills, the educational journey from kindergarten through college is a time when young people develop many interconnected abilities." | by Marilyn Price-Mitchell


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Mindy Weidman's curator insight, October 6, 10:23 AM

What is education to you???

Vocabmonk's curator insight, October 7, 1:19 AM

Let's know what is Education 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 7, 4:35 AM

NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development Research Capacity-Building in Africa

 What Is Education? Insights From The World's Greatest Minds
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Thoughts on Geographic Integration

Thoughts on Geographic Integration | school improvement process | Scoop.it

"This 18-stanza poem by Kit Salter, beautifully captures the importance of geographic thinking in any history/social studies curriculum.  This was shared by Dr. Vernon Domingo and the slides of his keynote address titled, Integrating Geography and History are available here."  

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"16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership"

This infographic was first shared on Top 100 Thought Leader Linda Fisher Thornton's Blog at LeadinginContext.com/Blog. It has become a reader favorite. Intensi…

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 24, 11:43 AM

When we allow external forces to be the sole adjudicators of what is ethical, we create ethical problems.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Ian Berry's curator insight, September 24, 6:50 PM

I love the list of 16. It explains really well the shifts that are happening.

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5 Memory Strategies For Learning Anything Fast

5 Memory Strategies For Learning Anything Fast | school improvement process | Scoop.it

If you want to do get to the top of your class or climb the ladder at work, you give yourself a gigantic advantage over everybody else if you can recall more information at a faster speed. 

Developmental psychologists and cognitive scientists have found range of factors that help do just that — and some of them are pretty weird. 

Here are a few. 

Reading physical books will improve your memory of what you read, since memory is also tactile. 

We usually think of reading as a totally visual exercise; after all, it's just your eyes scanning the page, right? 

Not quite. Turns out that we remember things better when we read them in a more physical form, like say, for instance, a book. It's because the experience of reading is also tactile. When you're reading a book, you're also holding it, feeling the heft of it in your hands. As you read through the text, the pages move from your right hand to your left, redistributing the weight of the book. Research suggests that your brain uses this movement of weight as an anchor of memory. 

A happy marriage lets you "distribute" your memory tasks between you and your partner. 

In news that will delight monogamists everywhere, research shows that people in long-term relationships have several memory benefits stemming from their couplehood — like recalling people's names or what happened at events. 

When two people are in an intimate, long-term relationship, they distribute the responsibilities of thinking in the same way that they split up household chores.

One psych writer observed that a couple isn't just two individuals spending lots of time together, but a "socially distributed cognitive system." Put in plain English, two heads really are better than one. 

A little "expressive writing" will free up your mental resources, thus improving your ability to recall. 

For 30 years, psychologists have been studying "expressive writing" — writing about difficult experiences for at least 15 minutes. Experiments show the introspective exercise is much more than just navel gazing. People who regularly write expressively have lower blood pressure, higher productivity, and a greater sense of personal well-being.

North Carolina State University psychologist Kitty Klein has shown that expressive writing increases memory, too. Her explanation: Expressive writing lets people disclose thoughts they otherwise spend mental energy trying to avoid, allowing more energy to be allocated toward memory. 

A walk through the woods will put you at ease — and improve your memory.

University of Michigan psychologists asked two groups of experiment participants to go for walks. One group walked around an urban environment, and the others wandered around a forest. Then they were given a recall test. The folks who sauntered among the trees performed 20% better on the memory test. 

Connecting what you just learned with what you already know will strengthen your memory. 

Washington University cognitive scientists Henry L. Roediger III and Mark A. McDaniel co-authored "Make It Stick," a masterful book on the way we learn. The book's got tons of great takeaways, but the most immediate are approaches for training memory. One of those techniques is elaboration — the process of connecting novel information to what you already know. 

"The more you can explain about the way your new learning relates to prior knowledge," the authors write, "the stronger your grasp of the new learning will be, and the more connections you create that will help you remember it later." 

Say, for example, you're learning about heat transference. Instead of memorizing the definition — heat moves from a hot object to a cooler object — you could use an example the way that the heat from a hot cup of cocoa warms up your hand on a chilly winter's day. 

SEE ALSO:  7 Memory Skills That Will Make You Way Smarter



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/tricks-to-improve-your-memory-2014-9#ixzz3DtE5NuXJ


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 20, 4:32 PM

If you want to do get to the top of your class or climb the ladder at work, you give yourself a gigantic advantage over everybody else if you can recall more information at a faster speed. 

Developmental psychologists and cognitive scientists have found range of factors that help do just that — and some of them are pretty weird. 

Here are a few. 

Reading physical books will improve your memory of what you read, since memory is also tactile. 

We usually think of reading as a totally visual exercise; after all, it's just your eyes scanning the page, right? 

Not quite. Turns out that we remember things better when we read them in a more physical form, like say, for instance, a book. It's because the experience of reading is also tactile. When you're reading a book, you're also holding it, feeling the heft of it in your hands. As you read through the text, the pages move from your right hand to your left, redistributing the weight of the book. Research suggests that your brain uses this movement of weight as an anchor of memory. 

A happy marriage lets you "distribute" your memory tasks between you and your partner. 

In news that will delight monogamists everywhere, research shows that people in long-term relationships have several memory benefits stemming from their couplehood — like recalling people's names or what happened at events. 

When two people are in an intimate, long-term relationship, they distribute the responsibilities of thinking in the same way that they split up household chores.

One psych writer observed that a couple isn't just two individuals spending lots of time together, but a "socially distributed cognitive system." Put in plain English, two heads really are better than one. 

A little "expressive writing" will free up your mental resources, thus improving your ability to recall. 

For 30 years, psychologists have been studying "expressive writing" — writing about difficult experiences for at least 15 minutes. Experiments show the introspective exercise is much more than just navel gazing. People who regularly write expressively have lower blood pressure, higher productivity, and a greater sense of personal well-being.

North Carolina State University psychologist Kitty Klein has shown that expressive writing increases memory, too. Her explanation: Expressive writing lets people disclose thoughts they otherwise spend mental energy trying to avoid, allowing more energy to be allocated toward memory. 

A walk through the woods will put you at ease — and improve your memory.

University of Michigan psychologists asked two groups of experiment participants to go for walks. One group walked around an urban environment, and the others wandered around a forest. Then they were given a recall test. The folks who sauntered among the trees performed 20% better on the memory test. 

Connecting what you just learned with what you already know will strengthen your memory. 

Washington University cognitive scientists Henry L. Roediger III and Mark A. McDaniel co-authored "Make It Stick," a masterful book on the way we learn. The book's got tons of great takeaways, but the most immediate are approaches for training memory. One of those techniques is elaboration — the process of connecting novel information to what you already know. 

"The more you can explain about the way your new learning relates to prior knowledge," the authors write, "the stronger your grasp of the new learning will be, and the more connections you create that will help you remember it later." 

Say, for example, you're learning about heat transference. Instead of memorizing the definition — heat moves from a hot object to a cooler object — you could use an example the way that the heat from a hot cup of cocoa warms up your hand on a chilly winter's day. 



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/tricks-to-improve-your-memory-2014-9#ixzz3DtE5NuXJ

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The School Is a Teacher—But What Are the Lessons?

The School Is a Teacher—But What Are the Lessons? | school improvement process | Scoop.it

the school is so much more than a physical facility in which teachers present lessons; it is a laboratory of living where ongoing practices and relationships educate. Educators should stop every now and then to consider the lessons the school may be teaching via its programs, policies, rules, and regulations—by its way of life. When doing so, they may be surprised—and chagrined.

 


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Being Happy at Work Matters

Being Happy at Work Matters | school improvement process | Scoop.it

People used to believe that you didn’t have to be happy at work to succeed. And you didn’t need to like the people you work with, or even share their values. “Work is not personal,” the thinking went. This is bunk.  My research with dozens of companies and hundreds of people — as well as the research conducted by the likes of neuroscientists Richard Davidson and V.S. Ramachandran and scholars such as Shawn Achor — increasingly points to a simple fact: Happy people are better workers. Those who are engaged with their jobs and colleagues work harder — and smarter.


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What Happens in Great Schools

What Happens in Great Schools | school improvement process | Scoop.it

After 40+ years of reporting about education, I am absolutely convinced that, in the very best schools, the students are the workers and the work they are doing is meaningful. What they do–their product–depends upon their ages and stages, but the concept doesn’t change. In these schools, teachers are conductors, directors, supervisors, guides or docents. This observation flies in the face of conventional wisdom, which holds that teachers are workers whose job is to produce capable students. That gets further bastardized when ‘capable’ is defined by test scores until we end up thinking, “The work of teachers is to add value, which is measured by higher te


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 8, 11:57 AM

Schools are not work places for students.That is part of a larger neo-liberal economic and political agenda. Schools are creative spaces where relationships emerge and curiosity fueled.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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How Transparency Can Transform School Culture

How Transparency Can Transform School Culture | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Leaders who demonstrate a continual desire to learn and connect whenever possible help set a precedence of transparency and innovation in a school's culture.

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How to Leverage Succession Planning to Drive Strategic Change

How to Leverage Succession Planning to Drive Strategic Change | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Talent management professionals design succession management/talent review processes that help leaders set, monitor and recalibrate their efforts to align people and strategy. Yet there is a great opportunity for improvement in these processes. [...]

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Kevin T. Kjellerup's curator insight, October 31, 12:04 PM

continual process improvement...hmmmm....novel idea?

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Leadership and Conflict: Deal With It Now or Pay For It Later

Leadership and Conflict: Deal With It Now or Pay For It Later | school improvement process | Scoop.it

It’s funny how some people are labeled or referred to as conflict – when in reality no one (in their right mind) would say they are conflict chasers. So now that I’ve merely reinforced what you already knew about conflict (that it stinks); why in the world am I writing about the importance of dealing with it? My answer is simple; dealing with conflict is a mandatory part of leadership.


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Attributes Of Awesomely Great Leaders

Attributes Of Awesomely Great Leaders | school improvement process | Scoop.it

There are many attributes that leaders from all facets possess. A number of these attributes are positive and unfortunately some not so positive. Organizations, teams and people in general are always searching for desirable attributes in leaders they want to work for. Not only leaders they want to work for, but leaders who inspire them to work harder and faster all while developing their personal leadership.


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"Great teams don't just happen.." - Six Characteristics That Make A Highly Effective Team

"Great teams don't just happen.." - Six Characteristics That Make A Highly Effective Team | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Great teams don’t just happen. Those teams that fit together like puzzle pieces are the result of hard work and thoughtful leadership. But what ...

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Kevin T. Kjellerup's curator insight, October 9, 9:03 AM

Can you think of a few others?

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Creating a culture of collaboration, not competition

Creating a culture of collaboration, not competition | school improvement process | Scoop.it

As I read education blogs, news editorials and Twitter, I sometimes am struck by the “us vs. them” mentality I see between veteran and newer teachers. The purpose of this article is not to demonize or laud either one of these groups, but rather to promote the idea that teachers should support one another. We all got into this profession for the same reason, and I suspect we will find that we are more alike than we realize. What’s more, both veteran — those in the profession for 10 years or more — and newer — those with five or fewer years of experience — teachers have valuable, unique skills and perspectives and could learn from each other. In the end, we all want to do the right thing for our students.


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The Most Important Skill for Great Leaders? Trustworthiness.

The Most Important Skill for Great Leaders? Trustworthiness. | school improvement process | Scoop.it
It doesn’t matter how competent you are as a leader, you won’t get very far if your team doesn’t trust you.

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Barbara Kimmel's curator insight, September 30, 1:39 PM

Trust trumps competence in leadership!

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Study examines role of school culture in promoting bullying, bystander intervention | News Bureau | University of Illinois

Study examines role of school culture in promoting bullying, bystander intervention | News Bureau | University of Illinois | school improvement process | Scoop.it

The News Bureau, part of Public Affairs, generates and coordinates news coverage of the Urbana-Champaign campus


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7 Essential Questions That Guide School Improvement

7 Essential Questions That Guide School Improvement | school improvement process | Scoop.it

I believe planning for improvement should begin with questions, rather than asking a team of people to fill in the blanks on a template. Great teaching involves asking students to wrestle with essential questions.  These seven questions could transform teaching and learning in your school.  


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Movie Time: Films Focused On Education Reform

Movie Time: Films Focused On Education Reform | school improvement process | Scoop.it
This lengthy list appeared on the Edutopia blog.
http://www.edutopia.org//article/movies-films-focused-education-reform (Movie Time: Films Focused On Education Reform - This lengthy list appeared on the Edutopia blog....
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