school improvemen...
Follow
Find
543 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by The Rice Process
onto school improvement process
Scoop.it!

Gains in Teacher Quality

Gains in Teacher Quality | school improvement process | Scoop.it
The quality of the teacher workforce in the United States is of considerable concern to education stakeholders and policymakers. Numerous studies show that student academic success depends in no small part on access to high-quality teachers.
more...
No comment yet.
school improvement process
leadership in schools
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

One Simple Habit that Elevates Leaders | eLEADERship | LEADERship

One Simple Habit that Elevates Leaders | eLEADERship | LEADERship | school improvement process | Scoop.it

5 reasons we stop with first questions:

Image protection. We don’t want to look like we have something to learn.Time pressure. We don’t have time to gain wisdom.Curiosity deficit. We just aren’t curious.Respect shortage. The person talking is “below” us. They’re younger, less successful, or less experienced.Self importance. Big headitis destroys leaders.

No one makes you wise.

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, July 17, 7:21 PM
5 reasons we stop with first questions:
  1. Image protection. We don’t want to look like we have something to learn.
  2. Time pressure. We don’t have time to gain wisdom.
  3. Curiosity deficit. We just aren’t curious.
  4. Respect shortage. The person talking is “below” us. They’re younger, less successful, or less experienced.
  5. Self importance. Big headitis destroys leaders.

No one makes you wise.

Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 17, 9:22 PM

and then there's the third and the fourth questions ... Before all these though are the great questions we ask ourselves such as Who am I that I'm glad I am? and Who am I that I don't really want to be? and Who am I yet to become?

Jason Smith's curator insight, July 18, 12:10 PM

Leadership and questioning

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Key to School Change: Getting Comfortable With Discomfort

The Key to School Change: Getting Comfortable With Discomfort | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Improvement requires change, which often means discomfort. Your school can edge out of its comfort zone by breaking down silos, taking risks, and shifting resources.

Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

12 Things You Can Do Starting Today to Be a Better Leader

12 Things You Can Do Starting Today to Be a Better Leader | school improvement process | Scoop.it

Some believe certain people are born leaders. Others think an individual can learn to be a leader. Regardless of how you may feel you obtained your leadership skills, there are always ways to enhance your abilities. This list of suggestions may inspire you to reevaluate your leadership abilities and address any issues you find need improvement.


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Innovation Strategies
Scoop.it!

What Is Design Thinking?

What Is Design Thinking? | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Customer-centric design is about looking out from the inside—rather than outside in. Today’s organizations face multifaceted problems that are part of increasingly complex business models. Continue...

Via Ken Cooper
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

Administrators: How to Get Out of the Office and Into Classrooms

Administrators: How to Get Out of the Office and Into Classrooms | school improvement process | Scoop.it
As an administrator, I think about the most enjoyable times I have had at school. Frankly, none of them include sitting in my office doing paperwork, disciplining, or attending meetings. The most enjoyable and productive times I have experienced are when I have been in the classroom observing teachers and interacting with students and teachers.

Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

Innovating Schools: 5 priorities

Innovating Schools: 5 priorities | school improvement process | Scoop.it

According to the OECD, these are the three ingredients for innovating schools and systems: 

Leadership: strong leaders who establish optimal conditions in their schoolsTeachers: Confident and capable in their practiceCulture: An openness to innovation


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

Watching teachers in classrooms may beat testing them, Vanderbilt study finds

Watching teachers in classrooms may beat testing them, Vanderbilt study finds | school improvement process | Scoop.it

A newly released multi-state study by Vanderbilt University researchers finds that simply observing teachers in a classroom rather than "value-added" testing is what really drives principals' decisions on hiring, firing, pay and other things.

And in the view of principals, those observations actually "may be more reliable than the 'value-added' measurements."


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

You Need an Elevator Pitch About School Culture and Climate

You Need an Elevator Pitch About School Culture and Climate | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Once a leadership team has helped the school community understand the importance of culture and climate, they are ready to assess it and improve it.

Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

The 5 most important terms for transforming schools

It is not terribly difficult to get people to agree on the need for transforming schools. The expression of this need comes not only from the “usual suspects,” i.e. politicians and academics, but also from teachers, administrators, and parents.


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Building a Caring Classroom Culture: An Action Plan

Building a Caring Classroom Culture: An Action Plan | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Developing new patterns of thought and action

Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Talent Management; Engagement
Scoop.it!

Leadership Momentum: 5 Easy-Peasy Ways to Create a Thriving Workplace -

Leadership Momentum: 5 Easy-Peasy Ways to Create a Thriving Workplace - | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Is it important to keep people happy at work? Only if you want them to WANT to work!

Via Anne Leong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

On Leadership and Doing Something About It!

On Leadership and Doing Something About It! | school improvement process | Scoop.it

Leadership and facing challenges.  Several years ago in a former job, I developed an unwise and an inexplicable habit. What I thought was something that challenged me in a positive way was actually something else.


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by The Rice Process
Scoop.it!

School Reform and the Facts: Are They Kin?

School Reform and the Facts: Are They Kin? | school improvement process | Scoop.it
America’s schools perform better than new headlines tell us they do. A recently released report challenges the framework of our national school reform effort.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place | school improvement process | Scoop.it

"It’s a good time to reflect on what truly inspires us. What gives us, as individuals, our own sense of independence? And how can we apply that sense of joyful independence to help us engage more actively and participate more readily in the world—to make it a better place, even? Cultivating a better geographical and cultural appreciation for the world, in the next generation as well as in our own, is a pretty good place to start."

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, perspective, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 18, 7:50 AM

This is awesome !!!

Luigi Cappel's comment, July 18, 4:08 PM
Great story, perhaps a Montestory. I made the pun because I had a terrible geography teacher. He wasn't interested in his subject and he was there as a job. Consequently whilst I scored high in most subjects, I failed this one. Despite that I have traveled the world many times for business an pleasure, learned many languages, which have seen me learn and appreciate countries and cultures. There are those of us who naturally have high IQ, but I believe all children have a brain that says "feed me and I will flourish". We must have teachers that elicit that.
Kenneth Peterson's curator insight, July 19, 12:59 PM

Montessori shines once again!

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Language of Choice and Support

The Language of Choice and Support | school improvement process | Scoop.it
For all students, especially those with mental health challenges, the language of empowerment and choice contributes significantly to an environment that helps them grow toward their goals.

Via Patti Kinney
The Rice Process's insight:

Language shapes behaviors and perceptions.

more...
Tasia Thompson's curator insight, July 14, 11:07 AM

How we speak to our students can set them on a path of growth or regression/destruction. Developing cultural proficiency in the area of mental health --educating ourselves on how we speak about or to our students who are experiencing struggles not only this area, but also academically and socially----is just as important as areas more commonly addressed areas of race, gender, sexual orientation,...-----because mental health really involves all of us and on a daily basis. 

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

You Can Learn to Love Criticism. Here's How. - InformED

You Can Learn to Love Criticism. Here's How. - InformED | school improvement process | Scoop.it

"Stephen King's first book, Carrie, was rejected thirty times. Walt Disney was fired from the Kansas City Star in 1919 because he "lacked imagination and had no good ideas.' Oprah Winfrey was fired as an evening news reporter for Baltimore's WJZ-TV because she couldn't separate her emotions from her stories. Steve Job was fired from the company he started, Apple, but was desperately brought back in to save in 1997."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 19, 6:40 AM

What is similar about all the situations mentioned above? In each, the individual was criticized, but they each moved on and became public figures who were incredibly successful. They learned from criticism.

This post explores criticism, sharing a section on how criticism originally focused on literary criticism, which was also at a time when many could not read or write, and tracing the history forward to today, where we often use the word feedback.

The post provides insight into why people often react negatively to criticism and then moves to ways to embrace criticism. Below are three examples from the post. More information on each is in the post as are additional ideas...and think about this as a type of mindset that may help our learners move forward.

* Be intellectually humble.

* Remember your own human tendency to criticize.

* Lower your defenses and take responsibility.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader

A Principal's Reflections: A Title Doesn't Make You a Leader | school improvement process | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator | school improvement process | Scoop.it
The educator becomes a connected educator and through sharing, is an active participant and contributor to the connected educator movement.

Being a connected educator means connecting with other teachers to exchange ideas, improve your teaching practice, and in turn, make a change in education. It is only through being connected that we can collaborate and help to foster learning for the 21st century and beyond. (Being a Connected Educator)

The gap between what is and what could be in education is larger than it ever has  been.  I believe this is largely due to technology and the ability to establish global connections because of social media. Educators are more connected and more aware about education trends than any time in the history of public education.

Imagine how education could be transformed if all educators use their own personal, often passion-driven voices. The bottom line is that if any individual educator believes there are flaws in the education, that it can be done better, then s/he has the responsibility to say something. I reaching the point that I am starting to believe it is a moral imperative for educators to share what they know to be true with other educators; and with administrators, students’ families, community members, politicians . . . the larger global society.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 31, 9:34 PM

I don't think this is a new responsibility, but it is important.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, April 1, 10:50 AM

J'aime ce post parce qu'effectivement, tout prof devient de facto une source pour les autres en matière de connaissance. Pourquoi pas le partager ?

Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, April 6, 9:50 AM

You'd be hard-pressed to find a better way to pay it forward than through shared learning... education.

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Leadership
Scoop.it!

Are You Listening Intentionally? Learn Three Work Strategies and How To Engage Each | Talking Point | The Disney Institute Blog

Are You Listening Intentionally? Learn Three Work Strategies and How To Engage Each | Talking Point | The Disney Institute Blog | school improvement process | Scoop.it
When it comes to sustaining employee engagement, a differentiating factor that often distinguishes a good organization from a great organization is leaders who intentionally listen and treat employees as individuals.

Via Anne Leong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century
Scoop.it!

On Changing Our Minds: A Call To Refine Instead Of Replace

On Changing Our Minds: A Call To Refine Instead Of Replace | school improvement process | Scoop.it
On Changing Our Minds: A Call To Refine Instead Of Replace

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

Principals As Chief Culture Officers: Five (Not Always Easy) Steps

Principals As Chief Culture Officers: Five (Not Always Easy) Steps | school improvement process | Scoop.it

There is much talk these days about the school principal as “instructional leader.” While the purpose of schools is ultimately about student learning, a principal risks getting “lost in the weeds” if her primary focus is on classroom instructional practice. Why is this the case? Because instruction is the result of the ideas, decisions, priorities and values of the people in the organization. In short, the overall instructional landscape is a byproduct of the school’s adult culture. Peter Drucker puts it bluntly (and unforgettably): “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”


Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Teaching English-My Bits 'n Pieces
Scoop.it!

At the Movies: Films Focused on Education Reform

At the Movies: Films Focused on Education Reform | school improvement process | Scoop.it
There's been quite a bit of buzz about documentary films that take a look at issues within the American education system. Whether you agree with the point of view of any of these films or not, they are sure to get you thinking.

Via Evdokia Roka, Gina Paschalidou
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Talent Management; Engagement
Scoop.it!

Want Your Team Engaged? Then Lead Them

Want Your Team Engaged? Then Lead Them | school improvement process | Scoop.it
An effective leader is only as good as the team they assemble (recruit and select), develop (properly train) and lead (set expectations and goals).

Via Anne Leong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by The Rice Process from Spaces Between
Scoop.it!

Students Do Better When Public Schools Get More Money

Students Do Better When Public Schools Get More Money | school improvement process | Scoop.it

"Recent research, however, has found that when schools have more money, they are able to give their students a better education. A new study on those who went to school during the school-finance cases a few decades ago found that those who attended districts that were affected by the rulings were more likely to stay in school through high school and college and are making more money today. The authors, Kirabo Jackson and Claudia Persico of Northwestern University and Rucker Johnson of the University of California, Berkeley, released a revised draft of their as-yet-unpublished paper this week. The benefits were most obvious for students from poor families. They found that a 10 percent increase in the money available for each low-income student resulted in a 9.5 percent increase in students' earnings as adults. A public investment in schools, they wrote, returned 8.9 percent annually for a typical pupil who started kindergarten in 1980. The findings are evidence that public schooling can be a way for children who grow up in poverty to overcome their circumstances, Johnson argued." | by Max Ehrenfreund

 


Via Todd Reimer
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 29, 10:37 PM

I don't agree with this premise necessarily. It might be true, but my experience was that most School managers were so inept in spending the money they were given that is hard to know for sure.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by The Rice Process from Middle Level Leadership
Scoop.it!

Teacher Leadership and Educational Improvement in a Complex System

Teacher Leadership and Educational Improvement in a Complex System | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Understanding education as a complex system means letting go of our attachment to cause-and-effect solutions (especially the so-called "silver bullets") in order to bring about improvements that last and have a meaningful impact on students...

Via Patti Kinney
more...
No comment yet.