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One Simple Habit that Elevates Leaders | eLEADERship | LEADERship

One Simple Habit that Elevates Leaders | eLEADERship | LEADERship | school improvement process | Scoop.it

5 reasons we stop with first questions:

Image protection. We don’t want to look like we have something to learn.Time pressure. We don’t have time to gain wisdom.Curiosity deficit. We just aren’t curious.Respect shortage. The person talking is “below” us. They’re younger, less successful, or less experienced.Self importance. Big headitis destroys leaders.

No one makes you wise.

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 


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Jason Smith's curator insight, July 18, 12:10 PM

Leadership and questioning

Justine Calpito's curator insight, August 4, 8:47 PM

5 reasons we stop with first questions:

Image protection. We don’t want to look like we have something to learn.Time pressure. We don’t have time to gain wisdom.Curiosity deficit. We just aren’t curious.Respect shortage. The person talking is “below” us. They’re younger, less successful, or less experienced.Self importance. Big headitis destroys leaders.

No one makes you wise.

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

Dennis Swender's curator insight, August 10, 12:04 PM

5 reasons we stop with first questions:

Image protection. We don’t want to look like we have something to learn.Time pressure. We don’t have time to gain wisdom.Curiosity deficit. We just aren’t curious.Respect shortage. The person talking is “below” us. They’re younger, less successful, or less experienced.Self importance. Big headitis destroys leaders.

No one makes you wise.

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

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"16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership"

This infographic was first shared on Top 100 Thought Leader Linda Fisher Thornton's Blog at LeadinginContext.com/Blog. It has become a reader favorite. Intensi…

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:43 AM

When we allow external forces to be the sole adjudicators of what is ethical, we create ethical problems.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Ian Berry's curator insight, September 24, 2014 6:50 PM

I love the list of 16. It explains really well the shifts that are happening.

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'An Industry of Mediocrity': Study Criticizes Teacher-Education Programs

'An Industry of Mediocrity': Study Criticizes Teacher-Education Programs | school improvement process | Scoop.it
The effort to rank programs, by the National Council on Teacher Quality and "U.S. News & World Report," has been controversial since it started, in 2011.

 

Colleges of education are "an industry of mediocrity" that churns out unprepared teachers to work in the nation's elementary and secondary schools, according to a highly anticipated report.

 

The report, "Teacher Prep Review," describes the findings of a controversial effort to rate the quality of programs at 1,130 institutions nationwide that prepare about 99 percent of the nation's traditionally trained teachers.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 29, 2014 10:31 PM


When following on Social Media Twitter, I must agree to that :(((


Gilda Macedo's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:00 PM

Se faz necessário criar estratégias de avaliação dos cursos oferecidos  e em contrapartida  avaliar as instituições de ensino seu currículo e programas de formação docente; 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 29, 2014 11:43 PM

This is one of those issues that feeds back and forth on itself. Colleges of education are an industry of mediocrity, but so is K-12 education. There is a total absence of leadership at the political and bureaucratic levels.

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Promoting a Culture of Learning

Promoting a Culture of Learning | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Learning is a culture.

It starts as a culture with the students as human beings needing to understand their environment. And it ends as a culture with students taking what we give them and using it

Via Gust MEES
The Rice Process's insight:

I agree. Creating a culture of learning requires intentional planning, shared practices and reflection. A culture embodies our beliefs and practices.

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Siti Noraisha Mohamed Senin's curator insight, February 18, 2014 11:02 PM

Create the culture of learning by giving room for students to apply what they have learnt without the fear of failing. Even when they do fail, instill in them the motivation to rise up once again. 

Kelly Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:11 AM

"Show them - Help them - Let them"

smadar yona's curator insight, February 25, 2014 3:37 PM

על זה בדיוק דברתי בשבוע שעבר,

זה מתחיל ביצירת תרבות למידה בין מורה לתלמיד פנים אל פנים מתוך אינטראקציה בינאישית וזה ממשיך לתהליכי למידה הוראה בשילוב דיגיטליות

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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | school improvement process | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


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Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2014 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, February 28, 4:54 PM

Includes a great podcast

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, February 28, 6:58 PM

We learn by doing, so teaching should ask us to do.

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Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator | school improvement process | Scoop.it
The educator becomes a connected educator and through sharing, is an active participant and contributor to the connected educator movement.

Being a connected educator means connecting with other teachers to exchange ideas, improve your teaching practice, and in turn, make a change in education. It is only through being connected that we can collaborate and help to foster learning for the 21st century and beyond. (Being a Connected Educator)

The gap between what is and what could be in education is larger than it ever has  been.  I believe this is largely due to technology and the ability to establish global connections because of social media. Educators are more connected and more aware about education trends than any time in the history of public education.

Imagine how education could be transformed if all educators use their own personal, often passion-driven voices. The bottom line is that if any individual educator believes there are flaws in the education, that it can be done better, then s/he has the responsibility to say something. I reaching the point that I am starting to believe it is a moral imperative for educators to share what they know to be true with other educators; and with administrators, students’ families, community members, politicians . . . the larger global society.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/?s=practice

 


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 31, 9:34 PM

I don't think this is a new responsibility, but it is important.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, April 1, 10:50 AM

J'aime ce post parce qu'effectivement, tout prof devient de facto une source pour les autres en matière de connaissance. Pourquoi pas le partager ?

Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, April 6, 9:50 AM

You'd be hard-pressed to find a better way to pay it forward than through shared learning... education.

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#Leadership: Love Thy Critics !

#Leadership: Love Thy Critics ! | school improvement process | Scoop.it
Just like a good tester breaks the system to find flaws so that the software becomes robust and stable, the same way, these people pinpoint where we are going wrong.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Proactive+Thinking

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 

 
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Teaching with Twitter – Please check your baggage at the door

Teaching with Twitter – Please check your baggage at the door | school improvement process | Scoop.it

How-to’s and link roundups on teaching with Twitter has been done many times before, but the topic is worth frequent revisiting and refreshing, especially in the context of the #FutureEd initiative and the Pedagogy Project by HASTAC Scholars.

 

The goal of this review is to help think through if, why, and how to use Twitter in our teaching and learning – especially for those who remain skeptical.

 


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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 15, 2014 1:37 PM

Very nice sharing. Thanks

Christopher Resetar's curator insight, February 16, 2014 1:01 PM

I really like this article because it is very effective at weighing the pros and cons of using twitter in the classroom.  Some of the supplemental links are also very helpful to look at and include content on how to teach with Twitter and how to avoid some of the pitfalls that can result from using Twitter in a classroom setting.   In general, I believe strongly in helping students to develop global competency (as we have discussed in class) and I believe that Twitter is one of the best and most convenient mediums to do this.  While I am slightly apprehensive about how and if it is even possible to use Twitter in an elementary school classroom I definitely see more potential in using it after reading this article. 

objectplace's curator insight, February 16, 2014 11:40 PM

twitter why and why not discussion with deep links for more.

Good for higher ed

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BOLD: Bold Leadership is Not What You Think

BOLD: Bold Leadership is Not What You Think | school improvement process | Scoop.it

 

Bold leadership isn’t reserved for the chosen few, and it certainly isn’t limited to popular culture’s definition of big, brash, loud leadership.

 

Bold leadership is about the everyday behaviors we use to build trust, focusing on the needs of others, leading with confident humility, and vulnerably engaging with our people in authentic and genuine ways.

Be BOLD!

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 13, 2014 12:48 PM


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip


Gaetan Klein's curator insight, February 14, 2014 11:52 AM

It is intereting to think about what is bold leadership. One must have quality in my opinion is presence : the quality of the relationship.

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Andragogy - are teaching strategies developed for adult learners

Andragogy

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page . Andragogy are teaching strategies developed for adult learners. Knowles, Holton, and Swanson (2005)described Andragogy as the "art and science to teaching adults to learn.It is often interpreted as the process of engaging adult learners with the structure of learning experience.


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Astrid Lemos's curator insight, January 13, 2014 6:31 PM

Knowledge in adults is one of the topycs we need to take into account in order to create limits in the listening skills to lern english