School Gardening Resources
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School Gardening Resources
Helpful Resources for School Gardeners from the University of Illinois Extension
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Discovering the Food System

Discovering the Food System | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

On-line curriculum for kids to employ participatory exploration in their communities to discover and learn about their food system. Designed for teachers and leaders of middle- and high-schooled aged youth, this website has downloadable lesson plans, activities, and more.

 

Cornell University

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Know Your State Soil

Know Your State Soil | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

A state soil is a soil that has special significance to a particular state. Each state in the United States has selected a state soil, twenty of which have been legislatively established. These “Official State Soils” share the same level of distinction as official state flowers and birds.

 

Natural Resources Conservation Service

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Enrich LA: A Garden in Every School

Enrich LA: A Garden in Every School | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Our purpose is to assist public schools to enrich the learning experience by building edible gardens and other green spaces for the benefit of all students and the surrounding community.

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It Takes a Village to Build a REAL School Garden

It Takes a Village to Build a REAL School Garden | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Each time we approach building a new school garden, one of the first things you will notice is that we need a village to build a great learning garden. We have lots of support from our community to help make a school garden possible and who are critical to our mission of growing successful students in our learning gardens.

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American Heart Association Teaching Gardens Curriculum

American Heart Association Teaching Gardens Curriculum | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

The following activities are examples of how the American Heart Association is engaging students in fun, educational, hands-on investigations of nutritious fruits and vegetables in and out of the garden.

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American Heart Association Teaching Gardens

American Heart Association Teaching Gardens | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

The American Heart Association is taking a new approach in the fight against childhood obesity. We’ve teamed with noted child-nutrition activist and philanthropist Kelly Meyer to create the American Heart Association Teaching Gardens planted in elementary schools across the country that become real-life learning laboratories for students to learn what it means to be healthy.

 

American Heart Association

 

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Composting to Reduce the Waste Stream

A guide to small scale food and yard waste composting.

 

Northeast Regional Agricultural Engineering Service

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Youth Involvement in the Garden

Youth Involvement in the Garden | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Recruiting Youth:  If you're having a difficult time recruiting youth for your project, take a step back and ask where did this idea come from?

 

Cornell Garden-Based Learning

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Build Your Own Bamboo Trellis

Learn how to build a trellis.

 

Michigan State Extension

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Garden-based Learning Projects for all Ages

Garden-based learning projects for all ages was first broadcast on March 7, 2012 as the second webinar in a five part series titled: Cultivating Community with Garden-Based Learning Programs. Running time approximately 24 minutes.

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Dig Art! Cultivating Creativity in the Garden

Dig Art! Cultivating Creativity in the Garden | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Dig Art! Cultivating Creativity in the Garden is a new project guide for educators working with youth that integrates gardening with the arts.

 

Cornell Garden-Based Learning

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Soil Contaminants and Best Practices for Healthy Gardens

Soil quality is affected by many factors, including past and present land use and nearness to pollution sources. Soil test results and site history can provide information to guide efforts to improve garden quality and protect the health of gardeners, their families, and others in the community.

 

Cornell University

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Tips for Trouble-Free Tomatoes

Somehow, millions manage to grow gazillions every year. They say the devil is in the details when
growing this fruit of the gods. Here are a dozen details that make it work and how.

 

Wisconsin Extension

 

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Garden Helps Sandy Spring Friends School Students Learn to Grow Nutritious Food

Garden Helps Sandy Spring Friends School Students Learn to Grow Nutritious Food | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

At Sandy Spring Friends School, students get their hands dirty working, and learning, on a farm.

 

The Washington Post

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Spread The Story of Soil | I Heart Soil

Spread The Story of Soil | I Heart Soil | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Soil is an amazing substance. It is a complex mix of ingredients: minerals, air, water, and organic matter—the countless micro-organisms and the decaying remains of once living things. Soil is made of life and soil makes life.

 

Soil Science Society of America

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Guilford County Cooperative Extension School Garden Network

Guilford County Cooperative Extension School Garden Network | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

The School Garden Network works to promote and expand hands-on school garden programs in Guilford County by bringing together teachers, parents, volunteers, Cooperative Extension and the Greensboro Children’s Museum to share information, integrate school gardening curriculum into classrooms, and to provide training for teachers and volunteers.

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Your Guide to Growing Winter Squash

Your Guide to Growing Winter Squash | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Winter squash is a warm-season vegetable that can be grown in most of the country. It differs from summer squash in that it is harvested and eaten in the mature fruit stage, when the seeds within have matured fully and the skin has hardened into a tough rind. When ripened to this stage, fruits of most varieties can be stored for use throughout the winter.

 

University of Illinois Extension

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American Heart Association Teaching Gardens - Moss Haven Elementary Plant Day

We recently had a Plant Day at Moss Haven Elementary in Dallas, Texas.

 

American Heart Association

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Gardening Builds Healthy Attitudes in Kids

Gardening Builds Healthy Attitudes in Kids | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

If you’re making plans to plant a garden this year, be sure to include the kids. Numerous studies have shown that participation in garden programs can have a positive impact on children’s attitudes toward fruits and vegetables.

 

West Hartford News

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Sowing the Seeds of Success

How to Start and Sustain a Kids' Gardening Project in your Community.

 

National Gardening Association

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No End to US Obesity Epidemic, Forecast Shows

No End to US Obesity Epidemic, Forecast Shows | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

More bad news about Americans' waistlines: They're only going to get bigger.  Already, about a third of people are obese. By 2030, it is estimated 42 percent of the population will be.

 

MSNBC

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Both Community And Garden Grow In 'Seedfolks'

An inner-city Cleveland community is drawn closer together as it works to transform a dirty vacant lot into a lush communal garden in Seedfolks.

 

NPR

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Outcome-based Garden Program Planning, Evaluation & Funding

Outcome-based Garden Program Planning, Evaluation & Funding | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Outcome-based garden program planning, evaluation & funding was first broadcast on March 21, 2012 as the fourth webinar in a five part series titled: Cultivating Community with Garden-Based Learning Programs.

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Seed to Salad Program

Seed to Salad Program | School Gardening Resources | Scoop.it

Welcome to Seed to Salad, an adaptable project that genuinely engages young people in growing salad gardens of their own.

 

Cornell Garden-Based Learning

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Sources and Impacts of Contaminants in Soils

Soils are formed by the decomposition of rock and organic matter over many years. Soil properties vary from place to place with differences in bedrock composition, climate, and other factors. At times, the amounts of some soil elements and other substances may exceed levels recommended for the health of humans, animals, or plants. Certain chemical elements occur naturally in soils as components of minerals, yet may be toxic at some concentrations. Other potentially harmful substances may end up in soils through human activities.

 

Cornell University


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