ScholarStudio News You Can Use
9 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

I Don't Write Enough Because ...

I Don't Write Enough Because ... | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
Time to face up to your particular and peculiar reasons for not getting your writing done.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Debt Free Higher Education | Oregon Working Families Party

Debt Free Higher Education | Oregon Working Families Party | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
Tell the Oregon Legislature not to go home before helping family farmers build their businesses. Tell your Legislator to vote yes on Aggie Bonds (HB 2700)!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Actually, the Humanities Aren't in Crisis

Actually, the Humanities Aren't in Crisis | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
Has there ever been a moment in American life when the humanities were less cherished? Yes. That would be 1985.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Debt Free Higher Education | Oregon Working Families Party

Debt Free Higher Education | Oregon Working Families Party | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
Tell the Oregon Legislature not to go home before helping family farmers build their businesses. Tell your Legislator to vote yes on Aggie Bonds (HB 2700)!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Daveena Tauber from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

A Note To Beginning Science Writers | Phenomena | National Geographic

From time to time, I get letters from people thinking seriously about becoming science writers. Some have no idea how to start; some have started but want to know how to get better. I usually respond with a hasty email, so that I can get back to figuring out for myself how to be a science writer. I thought it would be better for everyone—the people contacting me and myself—to sit down and write out a thorough response. (I’m also going to publish a final version of this on my web site, here.)

 

First a caveat: I am probably the wrong person to ask for this advice. I stumbled into this line of work without any proper planning in the early 1990s, when journalism was a very different industry. The answer to “How do I become a science writer?” is not equivalent to “How did you become a science writer?”

 

I was the sort of kid who wrote stories, cartoons, and failed imitations of Watership Down. By college, I was working on both fiction and nonfiction, majoring in English to learn from great writers while trying to avoid getting sucked into the self-annihilating maze of literary theory. After college, I spent a couple years at various jobs while writing short stories on my own, but I gradually realized I didn’t have enough in my brain yet to put on the page.

 

In 1989 I wrote to some magazines to see if they had any entry-level jobs. I got a response from a magazine called Discover, saying they needed an assistant copy editor. I got the job but turned out to be a less-than-perfect copy editor, which means that I was a terrible copy editor.

 

Fortunately, by then my editors had let me start to fact-check stories, which is arguably the best way to learn how to write about science. I got a chance to write short pieces, and I realized this was an experience unlike any previous writing I had done. I was writing about the natural world, but in nature I discovered strangeness beyond my own imagining. And scientists were willing to help me come to understand their discoveries. I stayed at Discover for ten years, the last four of which I was a senior editor there, and then headed out on my own, to write books, features, and other pieces.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Daveena Tauber from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

College associations introduce new ways to measure student completion

College associations introduce new ways to measure student completion | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it

The Student Achievement Measure (or SAM) involves looking at a number of student cohorts not measured by the federal rate and reporting on multiple success measures for each of them, using different time frames than the federal system.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Be employable, study philosophy

Be employable, study philosophy | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
The discipline teaches you how to think clearly, a gift that can be applied to just about any line of work
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Study Finds College Education Leaves Majority Of Graduates Unprepared To Carry Entire American Economic Recovery

Study Finds College Education Leaves Majority Of Graduates Unprepared To Carry Entire American Economic Recovery | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
NEW YORK—According to a new study published Wednesday in The American Educational Research Journal, an overwhelming majority of recent college graduates are completely unprepared to carry the full weight of the U.S.
Daveena Tauber's insight:

The Onion's satire is so good that someone on my FB page got offended when I posted this. He he he. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

As More Attend College, Majors Become More Career-Focused

As More Attend College, Majors Become More Career-Focused | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
There is now a higher distribution of career-focused college majors, but these degrees may be going to students who would not have gone to college at all in prior generations.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Daveena Tauber
Scoop.it!

Thirteen Economic Facts about Social Mobility and the Role of Education

Thirteen Economic Facts about Social Mobility and the Role of Education | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
In a new policy memo, The Hamilton Project examines the relationship between growing income inequality and social mobility in America.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Daveena Tauber from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

The Decline and Fall of the English Major

The Decline and Fall of the English Major | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
In the drift away from the humanities, we risk losing something essential in ourselves.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 24, 2013 10:28 AM

Curmudgeon? or Truthsayer?

 

Is this the proverbial "bitter pill" we resent being forced to swallow? Or, is it a call to action?

 

Personally, I choose to take it as a call to action in the same sense that Jonathon Swift's very bitter "A Modest Proposal" force-fed us a quite distastefully bitter pill of reality. 

 

It's the difference between "Ain't that the truth!" and "What can we do about this?"

 

Of interest to me is that we're not talking about mediocre students here or perhaps a mediocre embittered professor. Both the author and his subjects have "credentials." These are Harvard, Yale, Bard Pomona, Sarah Lawrence and Columbia-types.

 

We know everyone of them "aced" their standardized tests and Entrance exams don't we?

 

In a sense, the second paragraph puts the situation quite clearly. We've done an excellent job teaching them how to,...

 

"... assemble strings of jargon and generate clots of ventriloquistic syntax. They can meta-metastasize any thematic or ideological notion they happen upon. And they get good grades for doing just that."

 

It's not that this is what we taught. But, it is what too many thought was the main reason for studying great literature. At least it's what many thought was all they needed to know to pass the test.

 

But, what we apparently haven't done so well is teach them the skills associated with,...

 

"writing clearly, simply, with attention and openness to their own thoughts and emotions and the world around them."

 

I could not help but wonder about the conclusions drawn by the article's author, all of which contain truth. Yet there seems to be an elephant in the room of analysis.

 

The author suggests that,...

 

_____

"There is a certain literal-mindedness in the recent shift away from the humanities. It suggests a number of things. One, the rush to make education pay off presupposes that only the most immediately applicable skills are worth acquiring (though that doesn’t explain the current popularity of political science)."

_____

 

It's an easy conclusion to swallow when it's "them," not us at the heart of the problem. 

 

I certainly can not argue that there is an excessive focus on short-term reward.

 

"What's your major?"

"Literature."

"Really? Can you make any money with that major?"

 

Kind of reminds me of the Wall Streeters who consider immediate impact on their quarterly bonuses a much higher priority than long term success of the companies they choose to sell shares in or even the success of their own clients' investments.

 

But, the author goes on to say,...

 

_____

"Two, the humanities often do a bad job of explaining why the humanities matter. And three, the humanities often do a bad job of teaching the humanities. You don’t have to choose only one of these explanations. All three apply."

_____

 

When the author goes on to suggest that we who teach the humanities do a bad job of explaining why the humanities matter and that it is we who do a bad job of teaching the humanities, then the conclusion is not so easy to swallow. Nobody likes it when responsibility for "falling short" lands in our own laps.

 

Of course, I still believe that the vast majority of my colleagues in the English departments across the country are doing darned good work. Most go far beyond, extremely far beyond, any reasonable expectation the public might have for "giving it their all."

 

But, there are those within our profession as there are in any profession, who even when well-intended, don't do well helping their students connect the value of the humanities to 21st century hazily focused perceptions of value in their students' eyes. 

 

There's little doubt that the among the "best of the best" students, too many of them are simply best because the are better at figuring out what will be on the test. Understanding why the "right answer" is the right answer is not as important as knowing the the teacher or test designer has determined to be the right answers.

 

And then there is that disturbing sentence from the article,...

 

"They can assemble strings of jargon and generate clots of ventriloquistic syntax." 

 

And I can't help but wonder whether the author was suggesting that today's college students, even the elite, are graduating as ventriloquists (masters of misrepresentation) or as the ventriloquists' dummies (manipulated block heads)?

 

Certainly, they are not stupid people. Stupid people rarely get into such prestigious universities; or if they do, they rarely survive long without having "somebody's" finger on the scale.

 

Ironically, though the author bemoans the failure of his students to appreciate the value of the humanities, perhaps it is because they have spent their time mastering the skills associated with our attempts to measure what they have "learned." And, we really haven't developed sufficiently sophisticated attempts to measure what the have learned that can distinguish between what they have learned and what they can "appear to have learned."

 

And, that's not the test we hope they do well on in the real world.

 

In actuality, the author's students have mastered what we measure.

 

For some odd reason, it all reminds me of one of my favorite lines from an old Jean Shepherd story. I'll have to paraphrase, but it was from a story where Ralph, his constant character, is sitting in study hall. He suggests something ot the effect that, "the study hall teachers was pretending to care about what we were pretending to do."

 

Whattya say we worry a bit less about creating English Majors and a bit more about creating "humane beings"?

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

Jessica Laney Petty's comment, June 26, 2013 2:56 PM
You can't blame people. They have to think about their future. http://photographersinsandiego.com
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's comment, June 26, 2013 4:04 PM
I'm just hoping that people consider the importance of being informed and responsible citizens, neighbors, parents, and good friends in their futures. What's good for "me" is sometimes exactly what is not good for "we."
Rescooped by Daveena Tauber from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

How Badges Really Work in Higher Education

How Badges Really Work in Higher Education | ScholarStudio News You Can Use | Scoop.it
Digital badge initiatives at colleges and universities across the country are challenging assumptions about learning and assessment.

Via Don Dea
more...
Don Dea's curator insight, June 24, 2013 12:06 AM

Badges Get Serious 
Digital badges are getting a serious look on many university campuses because they may allow students to demonstrate a greater variety of skills. "A diploma says as much about the institution you attended as it does about you," notes Bill Wisser, instructional designer in the Graduate School of Education (HGSE) at Harvard University (MA). "A portfolio gets more granular, and badges can show individual records of accomplishment."