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Why Stretching Doesn't Make You More Flexible

Why Stretching Doesn't Make You More Flexible | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
By: Tia Ghose
Published: 11/14/2014 10:01 AM EST on LiveScience

Many people think stretching is essential to improving flexibility. Runners stretch their hamstrings before hitting the pavement, gymnasts do hyper-splits during their warm-ups and...

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What sets champions apart? - Novak Djokovic explains - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

What sets champions apart? - Novak Djokovic explains - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Mentality makes the difference.

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Craig Crossley's curator insight, November 16, 2014 4:07 AM

YEAR 12 HPE - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

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Here’s What Happens When an NFL Player Beats His Fiancée Unconscious

Here’s What Happens When an NFL Player Beats His Fiancée Unconscious | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
The NFL has a serious violence-against-women problem. (Another strong moment for @EdgeofSports.
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Battered and bruised - kids are shunning rugby - National - NZ Herald News

Battered and bruised - kids are shunning rugby - National - NZ Herald News | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
The parade of the rugby wounded happens every Saturday morning. Nursing broken arms and strained shoulders, children go to emergency departments throughout the country to have their - New Zealand Herald

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Debbie Robertson's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:10 AM

Great article for schol pe- effects on nz society!!!! :)

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The Ian Roberts interview made me feel embarrassed and ashamed about my prehistoric views, says Matthew Johns

The Ian Roberts interview made me feel embarrassed and ashamed about my prehistoric views, says Matthew Johns | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
IF last Sunday night’s Channel 7 interview with Ian Roberts didn’t change your opinion on the impact of concussions and what direction the NRL need to head to ensure player welfare, then you have no place in the modern game.

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Do sports stars need to fight against violence? - The Age

Do sports stars need to fight against violence? - The Age | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Do sports stars need to fight against violence?
The Age
Do sports stars need to fight against violence? (03:04). With State of Origin III just around the corner, we ask how to curb the violence so often witnessed in sport.

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Robert wilson's comment, February 9, 2015 7:08 PM
The way sports has changed through violence such as from the codes of state of origin in the 90s where the referees were much more lenient to fights and violence in state of origin to today's rules and referees which are much more harsher on player engaging in physical and violent acts outside the game itself on the field it will be a lot of help for talking about how violence is changing in sports from the perspective of player of the 90s to today's players in how violence in sports changes the game itself
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Violence in Sports: Promoting Character Development in Youth Athletics

Violence in Sports: Promoting Character Development in Youth Athletics | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Sports and regular activity are great for physical and mental health, learning leadership lessons, and engendering teamwork, but many modern sports are also dangerous and prone to conflict.

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Viewpoint: Make Kids Referee Their Own Sports Games - TIME

Viewpoint: Make Kids Referee Their Own Sports Games - TIME | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Viewpoint: Make Kids Referee Their Own Sports Games
TIME
It's often said that team sports serve as a proxy for actual violence.

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Short Fuses: Do Some Sports Make Kids More Violent? (Infographic)

Short Fuses: Do Some Sports Make Kids More Violent? (Infographic) | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it

Are students who play sports more violent? Research done by Xin Jian (a PhD candidate at Ohio State) raises this question. Quoting from the post:

"Her study, published this year in the Journal of Youth Adolescence, did not find "across-the-board advantages"—in other words, lower odds of being involved in violence—for young people who participated in sports-centered extracurriculars."

Youth Radio has reported on this issue (http://www.youthradio.org/news/do-sports-really-prevent-youth-violence) and GOOD partnered with them to create this infographic. The research findings show "contributing factors behind youth violence." A key finding is "contact sports increase the chance of fighting dramatically."
Additional information is available in the post, as well as a link to the the study done by Xin Jian, which was published in the 'Journal of Youth Adolescence.' 


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Edgar Eisiminger's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:37 AM

Going back to our convorsation about if sports are or are not violent. Worth a read.

Jason Gonsalves's curator insight, November 9, 2014 2:39 PM

I learned that many sports can make high school kids violent. Sports such as American Football, wrestling, and other contact sports are the culprits of violence in young athletes lives. I learned that if you play football, you are 42% more likely to be in a fight than if you played basketball.

 

It is interesting to see how certain contact sports that require intentional violence actually cause unnecessary violence in the lives of young athletes. This could possibly be linked to professional football players situations of domestic violence, for example most recently Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson.

 

I choose to read this article because it is interesting to learn about how sports can make children violent, since they are usually used to try to get kids out of violent situations.

 

This helps me because it will make me cautious of what types of sports to pursue a career in and how to help make them a positive impact on the lives of young athletes, instead of a negative violent one.

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Violence into sport can’t go

Violence into sport can’t go | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
When do spectators become fans and when do fans become fanatic?

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Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports? - World Magazine

Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports? - World Magazine | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
World Magazine
Are we cheering for victory or violence in sports?
World Magazine
Violence in sports cannot be ignored. Our collective knowledge of the damage done to athletes in certain sports over time has grown to a tipping point.

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John Baker's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:20 PM

Being safe in sports is important but entertaining is more important to fans.

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Masculinity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Masculinity is a set of qualities, characteristics or roles generally considered typical of, or appropriate to, a man. It can have degrees of comparison: "more masculine", "most masculine'". The opposite can be expressed by terms such as "unmanly'" or epicene.[1] A near-synonym of masculinity is virility (from Latin vir, man). Constructs of masculinity vary across historical and cultural contexts. The dandy, for instance, was regarded as an ideal of masculinity in the 19th century, but is considered effeminate by modern standards.[2]

Academic study of masculinity underwent a massive expansion of interest in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with courses in the United States dealing with masculinity rising from 30 to over 300.[3] This has led to the investigation of the intersection of masculinity with other axes of social discrimination and also to the use of concepts from other fields - such as feminism's model of the social construct of gender.[4]

The extent to which masculinity is a result of nature or nurture, a matter of what someone is born with or how they are socialised, has been the subject of much debate. Genome research has yielded much information about the development of masculine characteristics and the process of sexual differentiation specific to the reproductive system of human beings.. The SRY gene on the Y chromosome, which is critical for male sexual development, activates SOX9.[6] SOX9 associates with Sf1 to increase the level of Anti-Müllerian hormone to repress female development while activating and forming a feedforward loop with FGF9, which creates the testis cords and is responsible for the proliferation of sertoli cells.[7] The activation of SRY interferes with the process of creating a female, causing a chain of events that leads to testes formation, androgen production, and a range of pre-natal and post-natal hormonal effects. There is an extensive debate about how children develop gender identities. On the nature side of the debate, it is argued that masculinity is inextricably linked with the male body. In this view, masculinity is something that is associated with the biological male sex and having male genitalia, for instance, is regarded as a key aspect of masculinity.[8]


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Why We 'Choke' Under Pressure - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY

Why We 'Choke' Under Pressure - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it

“During the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, all eyes were on the U.S. Women's Gymnastics team, who won the team gold in gymnastics for America for the first time since 1996. But during the individual vault event, all eyes were on one U.S.”......


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Craig Crossley's curator insight, November 16, 2014 4:09 AM

YEAR 12 HPE - SPORT PSYCHOLOGY (Choking)

 

.....But when the time came for Maroney to sprint down the runway and spring off the apparatus, her gaze intent and her eyes on the prize, Maroney choked. She completely botched her performance, landing on the mat on her rear end. Needless to say, she lost the gold.

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Do Sports and Other Physical Activities Build Self-Esteem?

Do Sports and Other Physical Activities Build Self-Esteem? | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Early positive experiences of sports develop healthy, confident players
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Punters have shelled out their cash; let the violence begin

Punters have shelled out their cash;  let the violence begin | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
UFC was once on its knees, now it’s a show worth billions ("...a very large and vocal pubescent lobby." Entertaining piece by Brian O'Connor in Irish Times on UFC and fans.
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Bites, brawls and severed heads: football's history of violence - FIFA World Cup - NZ Herald News

Bites, brawls and severed heads: football's history of violence - FIFA World Cup - NZ Herald News | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Another game, another bite. That's the allegation against Uruguayan Luis Suárez, anyway, who has been accused of sinking his teeth into an opposition player. For the third time. - New Zealand Herald
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Aggression in Sport: The Nature of The Beast?

Aggression in Sport: The Nature of The Beast? | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
Competitors, spectators and parents need to understand the basis of aggression in sport, for it's potential influence on the community.

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Masculinity and violence: the men who play rugby league

Masculinity and violence: the men who play rugby league | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it

When his grandson was tragically killed while playing rugby league in April this year, former New South Wales and Australian halfback Tommy Raudonikis said: Everyone needs to understand that this was just…...


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Joshua Cowie's comment, February 7, 2015 6:15 PM
I watch rugby league and love the game, and I agree that it is a brutal game. "A hard game played by hard men." However the fact that this boy died playing the game is surely a reason to look at and ensure the safety of the men playing it. I also agree that the whole attitude about the hardness of the game may need to be altered so that we do everything in our power to ensure that something like this doesn't happen again.,
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There's Something Absolutely Wrong With What We Do To Boys Before They Grow Into Men

There's Something Absolutely Wrong With What We Do To Boys Before They Grow Into Men | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
How three words make a devastating impact in the lives of little boys.

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COUNTERPOINT: Aggressive, self-important sport apt for a sick society - Cherry Hill Courier Post

COUNTERPOINT: Aggressive, self-important sport apt for a sick society - Cherry Hill Courier Post | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
COUNTERPOINT: Aggressive, self-important sport apt for a sick society Cherry Hill Courier Post It's merely a symptom of a toxic sports culture that instills a massively inflated sense of importance, nurtures the body at the expense of the mind and...

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Australian Institute of Criminology - Violence in sport

While sporting violence on the part of participants and spectators is less frequent and less severe in Australia than in many countries, it remains grounds for concern.

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Sport, Violence and Society by Kevin Young

Sport, Violence and Society by Kevin Young | Level3 and Scholarship PE | Scoop.it
(2012). Sport, Violence and Society by Kevin Young. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy. ???aop.label???.

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Jessica Lee Clasen's curator insight, June 13, 2013 8:39 AM

I have been reading in our school book for class and I BELIEVE that violence can be reduced

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Violence and Aggression in Sports: An In-Depth Look (Part Three)

Here is the final installment of my work, "Violence and Aggression in Sports." Thanks to all who have been following along, I hope you have enjoyed this in-depth look at a disturbing trend...

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