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Literature goes online for free in Norway - Sydney Morning Herald

Literature goes online for free in Norway - Sydney Morning Herald | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Literature goes online for free in Norway Sydney Morning Herald At a time when the publishing world is torn over its relationship to the internet - which has massively expanded access to books but also threatens royalty...
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Could this work elsewhere?  Interesting that only a few publishers have requested removal of works.  Indeed, the thought is that digitization revives interest, at least in some works.  I'd really like to see the usage data of these works compares with sales.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 21, 2014 6:03 AM
Literature goes online for free in Norway
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Crowdsourced research: Many hands make tight work - Nature.com

Crowdsourced research: Many hands make tight work - Nature.com | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Crowdsourcing research can balance discussions, validate findings and better inform policy, say Raphael Silberzahn and Eric L. Uhlmann.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

One data set, many analysts can lead to a more balanced research...

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What is an Academic Journal?

What is an Academic Journal? | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
We spend much time these days wondering when the academic journal as we know it will cease to exist.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

This is in response to the "overlay journal" that essentially "publishes" articles from an open repository, which itself has no peer review and very limited  controls on quality.  Of course, those in support would say that post-publication peer review is the future, but I do believe that traditional publishers provide a filtering service.  I also see libraries serving a similar role, particularly to undergraduates, providing a selection of quality resources on the various topics for which their studies encompass.  

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Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi - BMC Blogs Network (blog)

Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi - BMC Blogs Network (blog) | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
BMC Blogs Network (blog)
Open Access in Iran: an Editor Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi
BMC Blogs Network (blog)
... Q+A with Mohammad Abdollahi.
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Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals - Inside Higher Ed

Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals - Inside Higher Ed | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Study finds huge increase in articles published by 'predatory' journals Inside Higher Ed The rise of open-access publishing, combined with pressure on academics to get published, has caused a spectacular increase in the number of articles spewed...
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One future for journal publishing | Logic Matters

RT @PeterSmith: Breaking the stranglehold of commercial publishers: one possible future for journal publishing http://t.co/em9fU0SxG2
Karen R. Harker's insight:

I should have looked down my list of stories in my Scoop.it! before posting my previous entry.  Here is a very interesting solution:

 

(From the original article quoted in the story)

...rather than publishing, or even electronically hosting, papers, it will consist of a list of links to arXiv preprints. Other than that, the journal will be entirely conventional: authors will submit links to arXiv preprints, and then the editors of the journal will find referees, using their quick opinions and more detailed reports in the usual way in order to decide which papers will be accepted. … [So] The articles will be peer-reviewed in the traditional way. There will also be a numbering system for the articles, so that when they are cited, they look like journal articles rather than “mere” arXiv preprints. They will be exclusive to Discrete Analysis (the journal).


Now, in case you don't know, arXiv is among the oldest and most prolific Open Access repository of papers.  It was started in the pre-Web neonatal-Internet days (remember FTP and Gopher?).  The focus of the papers are physics and mathematics, and the result is a huge and rich source of research.  While not technically peer-reviewed, the repository has a collaborative quality-control system that relies on volunteers to re-classify and remove irrelevant papers.  While there are some problems inherent with this system, it is arguably the most successful of these attempts.  


So now, why not take advantage of this rich and organized resource to do what journals do best - providing the best and most relevant articles for their readers.  That is what readers want - a filter that ensures quality and relevance.  It keeps the archive intact, so as not to censor research, but provides that filter to make it easier to stay up-to-date with the latest work.  


But...this will still cost something to maintain.  For this journal, they are relying first on Oxford University to pay some of the costs, but they are seeking additional funding.  And it's a system that is vulnerable to corruption - what will keep a publisher from exploiting this system and charging the same exorbitant prices the worst currently charge.   How to keep costs low but sustainable?

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A Scientific Look at Bad Science - The Atlantic

A Scientific Look at Bad Science - The Atlantic | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Recent research about fraud, errors, and other dismaying academic problems
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What counts as an academic publication?

What counts as an academic publication? | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
What is it that sets academic publications apart from articles on The Conversation? Peer review might be your first answer.

Via Hege Folkestad
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What to believe in the new world of open access publishing - The Conversation AU

What to believe in the new world of open access publishing - The Conversation AU | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Just as no one ever assumed that everything in print was trustworthy, neither should that be the case for open access content.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Long but interesting presentation & discussion of the issue of "predatory" vs. "quality" scholarly publishing.  

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Trends in Research Publications INFORMS Editors' Panel

INFORMS Annual Meeting San Francisco, CA, November 2014.
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Still need to listen to this...

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A mixed methods study of the factors that influence whether intervention research has policy and practice impacts: perceptions of Australian researchers -- -- BMJ Open

What factors influence the real impact of health intervention research? Key findings http://t.co/cHhXDHpG8c @SimonChapman6 @BMJ_Open
Karen R. Harker's insight:

One finding: "Peer-review journal publication on intervention effects appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, to produce policy and practice impacts."

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UKSG Conference 2013 - Plenary Session 5 - YouTube

Publishers and librarians: we share the same values -- why are we fighting? T Scott Plutchak University of Alabama at Birmingham
Karen R. Harker's insight:

"We're (librarians & publishers) are squared off in our corners looking at each other through this lens of caricatures."

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T. Scott: What We Share

T. Scott: What We Share | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
I was in Frankfurt in 2006, having been invited to speak at the annual meeting of the STM association. It was a heady experience. I don't remember what I talked about (I hope it was useful) but I certainly learned...
Karen R. Harker's insight:

"I still believe that the best way forward is for librarians, publishers of all stripes, researchers, academics and members of the public to engage and argue and work together to build a scholarly ecosystem that works for the public good."


It *is* hard to get past the jealousy and resentment of the wild financial success of a few very large publishers that has been built from the shrinking budgets of academic libraries.  However, not *all* publishers are of that same ilk.  And, indeed, we *are* part of that "scholarly ecosystem."  

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Speeding up scholarly communication for rapid sharing - Times Higher Education (blog)

Speeding up scholarly communication for rapid sharing - Times Higher Education (blog) | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Dalmeet Singh Chawla rounds up the recent discussion about single figure publications
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Interesting idea...“single figure publications” (SFPs).  

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How Much Should Scientists Check Other Scientists' Work? - Wall Street Journal

How Much Should Scientists Check Other Scientists' Work? - Wall Street Journal | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
A debate is growing in the research world over the value of replicating older, peer-reviewed studies.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Replicating studies is under-appreciated in the academic world.  However, it is especially needed with social & psychological studies where there can be so many variables that are impossible to control for in any one study.  The more the hypotheses are tested, the more we can learn.

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Guest Post: HighWire’s John Sack on Online Indexing of Scholarly Publications: Part 1, What We All Have Accomplished

Guest Post: HighWire’s John Sack on Online Indexing of Scholarly Publications: Part 1, What We All Have Accomplished | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
HighWire's John Sack looks at the changes that search engine indexing has driven for discovery of research publications. Part 1 of a two part series covering Anurag Acharya's recent ALPSP keynote address.
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Open Science Revolution – New Ways of Publishing Research in The Digital Age - Scicasts (press release) (blog)

Scicasts (press release) (blog) Open Science Revolution – New Ways of Publishing Research in The Digital Age Scicasts (press release) (blog) Here is a handful of examples, implemented by three companies – a recently launched open access journal...
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Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web

Google, Twitter and Publishers Seek Faster Web | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
The goal is to develop a universal standard for publishers — one that could be used to load articles more quickly wherever they appear.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

From my experience, it's the myriad of advertising that makes Web pages slow, not the content itself...except for videos.  It seems like the pages that take the longest to load are the ones with the most advertising.  The connections to these advertising sites are what take the longest.  The system they are proposing doesn't seem to help with that problem.

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Harvard University says it can't afford journal publishers' prices

Harvard University says it can't afford journal publishers' prices | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
University wants scientists to make their research open access and resign from publications that keep articles behind paywalls
Karen R. Harker's insight:

When Harvard, *Harvard*, can no longer afford journals, something is wrong!  This problem, however, is too difficult to solve by abandoning all subscription-based journals.  Gold Open Access is not sustainable because it merely  pushes the burden of the costs to the authors and/or funding agencies themselves, while Green OA won't work on a larger level because it *does cost* a certain amount to provide quality work.   Competition in the market could solve the problem of the high prices, which, after all, is what started the discussion in the first place.  But unrestricted capitalism, combined with a system of scientific production that is steaming out of control, has reduced competition and concentrated the market.  I do see a way out, though...IF libraries retain subscriptions to only the most cost-effective and sustainable journals, AND IF researchers refuse to collaborate with the least sustainable journals, AND IF professional societies insist on keeping their subscription fees low when contracting with publishers (or not selling their publishing off at all), then competition could be restored, and prices maintained at sustainable levels.  But I'm sure there are a myriad of other factors and impacts that such a solution would have.  It's a conundrum.

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Open for Business - Inside Higher Ed (blog)

Open for Business - Inside Higher Ed (blog) | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Open for Business
Inside Higher Ed (blog)
Basically, scientists want access to scientific research and these days even a well-funded institution can't afford all the journals where research of interest may be published.
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5 Aug Predatory publishers

Predatory publishers,” presented by Paula Callan, Scholarly communications Librarian, QUT and Stephanie Bradbury, Research Support Coordinator, QUT.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

OK, *this* is the long but interesting presentation on predatory publishing...But the other item is interesting too.

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Bibliometrics: Difference between revisions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bibliometrics: Difference between revisions - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Bibliometrics was just edited by The Transhumanist http://t.co/gAx4ZCGgY7
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Universities wasting public money on 'pointless' research, says think tank ... - Telegraph.co.uk

Universities wasting public money on 'pointless' research, says think tank ... - Telegraph.co.uk | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
The way government research funding is allocated to universities may be distorting academic priorities, one think tank has said
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Now, this is a study of UK gov't funding of research at UK institutions...but, in general, does government funding of research lead to the tail ragging the dog?

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Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, librarians at Utrecht University, talk with podcast host Stewart Wills about their 101 Innovations project. Continue reading →
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Scientists Are Hoarding Data And It’s Ruining Medical Research

Scientists Are Hoarding Data And It’s Ruining Medical Research | Scholarly Communication | Scoop.it
Major flaws in two massive trials of deworming pills show the importance of sharing data — which most scientists don't do.
Karen R. Harker's insight:

So true, so true

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UK University Journal Costs

RT @McDawg: So how much do publishers charge the likes of @ucl & @imperialcollege ? http://t.co/TUdUid0iC7 http://t.co/5jOAXbNqun
Karen R. Harker's insight:

Wow...this is interesting.  They provide a graphic showing the distribution of spending on journals by UK universities by publisher over time.  I need to do the same thing for us.  Gee, it would be nice to do the same thing for our peers.

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