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Per rilevare e monitorare consumi energetici, temperatura, umidità e altre variabili ambientali
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The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them

The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them | scatol8® | Scoop.it
When the city is viewed not as a destination for design but as the source material for it, a new relationship between design and the urban landscape is possible.

Whether it’s repurposing a billboard to act as a humidity collection system for clean drinking water in Lima, Peru, or integrating Wi-Fi capabilities into Madrid’s paving stones with the iPavement initiative, cities are increasingly expanding the capabilities of their existing assets and reforming the urban terrain as a landscape of opportunity.


The truth is that a city has all the resources it needs; the key to unlocking these resources is seeing the urban landscape not as the end result of a previous creative process, but as the beginning of a new one—a landscape to design with, not for.


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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | scatol8® | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | scatol8® | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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35 Urban Innovations We're Watching This Year

35 Urban Innovations We're Watching This Year | scatol8® | Scoop.it

In the Global Innovation Series, presented by BMW i, Mashable highlights new technologies that will improve the urban experience.


City dwellers are always thinking about mobility, energy, shelter, safety and efficiency, and many technologies and startups in cities all around the globe are developing new tools to ameliorate these daily problems. If these concepts come to fruition, then the future of cities is looking bright.


Whether you're thinking easier ways to park your car or ideas for the home of the future, studying how we'll live in the next 10, 50 or 100 years can reshape the habits and challenges we face today. In this article link, there are 35 topics we've covered in the series, and they offer an exciting glimpse into the future of city life...


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Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning?

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning? | scatol8® | Scoop.it

China's next new city will be designed by US firm KPF, next to Hunan's regional capital, around a 40-hectare lake.


Adjacent to Changsha, the ancient capital city of Hunan, the design implements the sort of urban innovation that creates a sustainable and truly habitable environment.

"We can introduce integrated urban innovation," von Klemperer says, "we can combine water transport with localised energy production, cluster neighbourhood centres, advanced flood prevention and water management, and urban agriculture. Meixi is an experiment in future city planning and building. It will serve Changsha as a new CBD, but it will also serve as a paradigm for other Chinese city planners. It's a kind of live test case."


The firm seeks to achieve these goals through its dense, mixed-use urban, plan, with integration with surrounding mountains, lakes, parks and canals. Meixi Lake will eventually be home to 180,000 inhabitants, living in "villages" of 10,000 people, clustered around the canals...



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Landfill Harmonic


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:02 PM

Here in Cateura, Paraguay the inhabitants live on a landfill. the quote in the begining of the video says, "the world sends us garbage, we send back music", and it couldn't be more accurate than that. citizens recycle the garbage and sell it. it is very inspiring to see these people make the best of their situation, when a lot of people in America complain about traffic, and menial problems. While going through the trash a violin shell was found which sparked imagination. people started to make instruments like violins, flutes, and cellos. Cateura now has a whole recycled orchestra that makes beautiful sounds. hearing and seeing this wonderful progress from thrown away items, i wonder what Americans could produce with the trash that is thrown away here. with the highest point in RI the Johnston Landfill, we must have some good trash. 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:54 PM

It is amazing on how these slum residents have a brilliant idea in how to convert waste and trash into a gorgeous music. Imagination plays a giant roll into poverty. People need to subsist and imagination makes this possible by taking anything in their environment and having it serve a particular purpose. The high percentage of contamination in this pollute field is another pressing matter, however this issue does not stop residents from pursuing their dreams. Enhancing their skills in music by making musical instruments out of trash, allows them to escape from their problems. In this little town in Paraguay, poverty and excess waste is prevalent in this society, but the residents take advantage of their waste polluted fields and make musical instruments out of what they find in them. Furthermore, this ingenuity helps children and improves their overall quality of life.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:19 PM
After seeing this video, I have come to realize that here in America, we take so much for granted and complain about the smallest of things that do not go the way wanted, most Americans always want the newest and best of things whether it be cars, houses or electronics. Here in this video, you can just see the happiness these kids have and the joy that is brought to their lives using junk, literally junk. Their instruments are made from broken instruments or pieces of garbage picked from the landfill that could make the instruments. The fact that they are poor, live in slums and can have such joy in their lives, should be an eye opener for us here in America so that we stop taking our lives for granted and realize if people can be poor and find joy out of junk, then we can stop being selfish and take pride and joy in what we have even if it is not the newest and greatest thing on the market.
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Green Space + Pedestrian-Oriented Development: Futian District masterplan in Shenzhen by SWA Group

Green Space + Pedestrian-Oriented Development: Futian District masterplan in Shenzhen by SWA Group | scatol8® | Scoop.it
SWA Group has been selected to redesign Futian District in Shenzhen, China.

The landscape architecture and urban planning firm hopes to transform the congested and car-dominated district of central Shenzhen into a calmer, greener space where pedestrians are welcome.

As part of SWA’s masterplan, titled Garden City of Tomorrow, residential streets will be made over with exercise areas for all age groups as well as quieter green spaces. Office streets will incorporate gardens with seating areas, while retail streets will encourage pedestrian traffic with public art and better lighting. A botanical garden in the shape of a circuit board, representing the Chinese city’s electronics industry, has been proposed for a space alongside the Civic Center.

“Our landscape and urban design strategies will rebalance Futian from a car-dominated city with a challenging street system to offer a more beautiful, more functional environment, from landscaped boulevards and greenspaces to plazas and large gathering spaces,” said Sean O’Malley, the principal leading the masterplan from SWA Group...

 

See more renderings and learn more about the Garden City of Tomorrow at the complete article.


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A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater

A Siberian Eco-city Inside a One Kilometer Crater | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Eco-city 2020 is a proposal for the rehabilitation of the Mirniy industrial zone in Eastern Siberia, Russia designed by the innovative architectural studio AB Elis Ltd.

The project would be located inside a giant man-made crater of more than one kilometer in diameter and 550 meters deep that used to be one of the world’s largest quarries. The idea is to create a new garden city shielded from the harsh Siberian environmental conditions and instead, attract tourists and residents to Eastern Siberia, with the ability to accommodate more than 100,000 people. The new city is planned to be divided in 3 main levels with a vertical farm, forests, residences, and recreational areas.

One of the most interesting aspects of the proposal is the glass dome that will protect the city and would be covered by photovoltaic cells that will harvest enough solar energy for the new development. A central core houses the majority of the vertical circulations and infrastructure along with a multi-level research center. The housing area is located in the first level with outdoor terraces overlooking a forest in the center of the city, in order to create a new type of highly dense urbanism in harmony with nature.


View diagrams & renderings, and learn more about this interesting approach to urban design, sustainability and renewal at the complete article link...


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Los Angeles Walking Tour

Los Angeles Walking Tour | scatol8® | Scoop.it

"This map-based site contains hundreds of images of downtown Los Angeles, Displaying its tremendous architectural, cultural, and economic diversity. Maps of seven downtown subregions are accessible either by clicking on this map or on the list of subregion names to the left. Each regional map provides access to specific places in downtown in the same way."


This is a great example of a neighborhood project than shows the economic and cultural differences between places. 


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Monitoring the Storm Surge

Monitoring the Storm Surge | scatol8® | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...


When the Pawtuxet River flooded in Rhode Island, I was watching this site to get a sense of how bad the flooding was and to put it in historic context (the National Weather Service has links to live data at many locations).  This particular station in NYC at the Battery is important to keep an eye on with Hurricane Sandy because if the strom surge is over 10 feet, the subway system could flood and the issues confronting New York would be devastating.  As meterologist Andy Lesage noted, "During Irene it got to 9.5ft, 8-12 inches shy of flooding the subway system so if the Battery gets to something like 10.25+ ft, it will indicate massive damage to the cities' infrastructure."  For more see, the Weather Underground and Jeff Masters' analysis.


Tags: disasters,water, physical, NYC, transportation, weather and climate.


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Gary Robertson's comment, November 2, 2012 9:57 AM
This chart shows graphically how time-of-day (high tide), time-of-month (high lunar tide), and time of landfall all coincided to help create this disaster. it just wasn't a wind-driven event, but a coincidental alignment of several factors resulting in a worst-case result.
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Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Cities are hotbeds of sustainability, right? From urban agriculture to social enterprise, you’ll find lots of innovative approaches in urban centers, particularly those on the US coasts. Put a lot of people together in one place, and you generate a lot of ideas.


You also generate a lot of heat, it turns out: a new study in Nature Climate Change argues that urban centers (particularly on coasts) generate a lot of waste heat… and that heat is contributing to the weird weather patterns we’ve been seeing lately. This isn’t climate change (in the way we’ve conventionally considered it), nor is it the “urban heat island” effect. Rather, according to the research team that authored the study...


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Gerry B's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:58 AM

About time something should be done on exhausts coming from cities. 

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:19 AM

I think this new research proves how much little things we do in the city, such as driving back and forth to a shopping mall everyday, effects the environment and impacts the weather. I live in Florida and I really don't want an even hotter summer when I go into the city, so I hope people (including myself) think about the environment and make better decisions when we are heading to town, like maybe riding a local bus from place to place or car pulling with friends. -RT

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, March 10, 2015 9:58 PM

This article really makes you think about how we take advantage of the opportunities for resource sharing offered in urban settings. I think people don't have to make a place hotter by generating heat. For instance instead of driving your car to work, you could ride a bike or a bus. -CB 

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | scatol8® | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development

America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development | scatol8® | Scoop.it

A streetscape that includes natural landscaping, bicycle lanes, wind powered lighting, storm water diversion for irrigation, drought-resistant native plants and innovative “smog-eating” concrete has earned Cermak road in Chicago the title of “greenest Street in America” according to the Chicago Department of Transport (CDOT).


Opened in October 2012, the first phase two mile stretch is part of the Blue Island/Cermak Sustainable Streetscape project which was introduced in 2009 with the aim of reducing overall energy usage by 42 percent.


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Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:42 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 6:22 PM

how does your street rate? compare it to the 'greenest street in America?

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The High Line Effect: Top 10 Urban Transformation Projects

The High Line Effect: Top 10 Urban Transformation Projects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Given the environmental straits we find ourselves in at present, architects and policy makers have to rethink our strategy of how to shape the city, buildings, and urban space alike.


This entails that we refrain from the tabula rasa strategies of the past and make do with the standing infrastructure that we already have. Preserving and rehabilitating the aging steel relics of our global cities has proven an ingenious way of saving energy, while enabling newer methods of architectural planning. Projects such as the High Line have kickstarted a new age of urban regeneration—for good or ill—with initiatives from Tel Aviv to Philadelphia attempting to replicate its success on their own turf.

 

When it comes to urban transformation, size does not matter, per se. The subtleties of thoughtful urban projects shine through at every level, and sometime outperform their more ostentatious contemporaries. The best projects spur new occupation and lively places...


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Lauren Moss's curator insight, December 30, 2012 8:51 PM

Examples of urban transformation across the globe, from public parks to rehabilitation projects, with links provided for further research and investigation...

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 31, 2012 12:04 AM

Examples of creative answers for urban design at this site.

Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, December 31, 2012 4:35 AM

Transformation Projects and City Design : this is possible the most amazing job to do for the next decade. Who would not change everything to get into a

project that changes peoples lives?

 

I love this. Be aware of the gainijng power of this as a upcoming trend for the next years.

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Favela Images

Favela Images | scatol8® | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.

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Biophilic Design at the High Line: 510 West 22nd Street by COOKFOX Architects

Biophilic Design at the High Line: 510 West 22nd Street by COOKFOX Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

COOKFOX designs a biophilic office building along the High Line that looks to connect with nature and serve as the next version of the sustainable workplace...


While One Bryant Park—the firm’s groundbreaking Platinum LEED tower—distinguished itself on the city skyline with a glacial, shard-like glass profile- 510 West 22nd Street responds directly to the neighboring elevated-rail-turned-urban-park and seeks to connect tenants with the landscape.

The building’s glass curtain wall has dark metal mullions that reflect the High Line’s steel structure and brise-soleils that reduce glare and mitigate heat. The building also has a High Line of its own with a rooftop garden, complete with mobile planters on train tracks.

Inside, high ceilings, abundant daylight, and an under-floor ventilation system create a healthy environment. Views were optimized by cantilevering the floor slabs, making way for unbroken expanses of glass on the perimeter. Operable windows provide access to fresh air and let in the sounds of the birds who live in the High Line’s birch thicket just outside.

510 will seek a LEED Platinum rating, banking not just on the energy saving measures of its high-performance envelope and efficient mechanical systems, but on the strides it takes in establishing an environment conducive to the health and well-being of its human inhabitants...


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A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen | scatol8® | Scoop.it
How the world's wealthiest cities can beat back climate change.

 

From the Atlantic Cities:

 

Alex Steffen calls himself a planetary futurist. That means he has confronted some grim realities in the nearly 10 years since he founded Worldchanging.com, an online publication that pioneered coverage of climate change and related issues in the early years of the 21st century.  
He’s kept busy writing and speaking about creative, sustainable solutions that could help us find a way to survive and even thrive in the face of a planetary challenge that political leaders in the United States have been reluctant to face.
His most recent book, which comes out November 26, is called Carbon Zero: Imagining Cities That Can Save the Planet. In it, he lays out his case that "remaking the world’s wealthiest cities over the next 20 years may prove the best—perhaps the only—chance we have of avoiding planetary catastrophe."

I talked with Steffen the other day via Skype about post-Sandy climate politics, how to "ruggedize" a city, and whether we’re all doomed. This is an edited version of our conversation.


Visit the link for the article & interview...


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What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability

What Makes a Great City: A General Theory of Walkability | scatol8® | Scoop.it

City engineers have turned our downtowns into places that are easy to get to but not worth arriving at.


In Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time (public library), city planner Jeff Speck, who spent four years leading the design division of the National Endowment for the Arts working directly with a couple hundred mayors to help solve their greatest city-planning challenges, turns a perceptive eye towards what makes a great city and how we might be able to harness the power of a conceptually simple, practically complex, immeasurably far-reaching solution in improving the fabric and experience of urban life.

 

Speck outlines a “General Theory of Walkability,” focusing on the four key factors of making a city attractive to pedestrians: 'it must be useful, safe, comfortable, and interesting. Each of these qualities is essential an none alone is sufficient...'


Learn more about urban livability, how to create the conditions that enable pedestrian-oriented development, and the benefits of this approach to urban spaces to the economic, environmental, and cultural health of a city at the article link...


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The Uninvisible Art of Amazing Urban Camouflage | WebUrbanist

The Uninvisible Art of Amazing Urban Camouflage | WebUrbanist | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Camouflage isn't just for natural environments - it can be used surprisingly effectively in urban surroundings as well.

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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built...

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built... | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The cities of the future will have waste-to-energy plants, not shopping malls or churches, at their center, according to urban designer Mitchell Joachim of Terreform ONE.

At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism".

The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place...

That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability...


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