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10 places vying for the title of greenest building on the planet

10 places vying for the title of greenest building on the planet | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Take a look at some of the greenest buildings ever constructed

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Garoza House: A Modern, Modular Prefab Housing Prototype

Garoza House: A Modern, Modular Prefab Housing Prototype | scatol8® | Scoop.it

An industrialized modular housing prototype that allows growth and changes over time, with all systems installed without complex construction procedures.


Manufactured in specialized factories composing single complete units, including all the interior finishes, modules are the maximum size supported by conventional transport.

Interior partitions, storage and fixed furniture are incorporated to the vertical walls, which house highly qualified technical facilities, automation and electronic systems, tailored to the program for each configuration. The resulting collection provides quality, increased control with regard to construction scheduling, maintenance plans and offers flexibility for future growth. 


The principles of sustainable economy and the spirit of recycling guide and support all the project decisions.


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Jenny Morris's comment, July 16, 2013 11:23 PM
This reminds me of the Smart Home exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago...very cool!
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Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living

Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living | scatol8® | Scoop.it

It may look unassuming, but this sleek black box is the culmination of a two-year long collaboration of more than 50 students from 7 different faculties of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.


Initially envisioned by two architecture students and built for the European Solar Decathlon 2012 in Madrid, the goal of Odooproject was to encourage a new sustainable life by designing a house where as much time as possible can be spent outdoors.

Odoo’s square plan has two primary elements: the north half enclosure and the south half outdoor terrace, bordered by the ‘summer wall’ to the south. The design allows comfortable living inside or outside throughout the year as the seasons allow.

To provide a comfortable environment, as efficiently as possible, the house uses both active and passive systems. The compact form of Odoo reduces heat loss, while its organization means it has two south-facing facades. The glass façade exploits solar gain, to heat the interior during the winter, and the solar panels on the ‘summer wall’ generate power from the summer sun...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:26 AM

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bancoideas's curator insight, February 8, 2013 10:22 AM
Ideas para mejorar la vida
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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | scatol8® | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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Sustainability & Education at Shanghai's Largest Organic Farm

Sustainability & Education at Shanghai's Largest Organic Farm | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Tony’s Farm is the biggest organic food farm in Shanghai, which produces certified vegetables and fruits. But it's more than just a place for vegetable production. The vision is to integrate the consumer and therefore promote a natural lifestyle.


To link the activities of the working people with the visitors of the farm, playze developed a building complex, which combines the main reception, a lobby, (working also for the future hotel rooms) and a vip area, with the new offices and an existing warehouse, where the fruits and vegetables are being packed. The building provides transparency within the manufacturing process. Thus it supports the vision of integrating the visitor and helps to reinforce the consumer confidence in the products of the farm. At the same time the building design is driven by the concept of sustainability, combined with it's iconic qualities, it communicates and promotes the core concept of the Farm...


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Lauren Moss's curator insight, January 5, 2013 3:41 PM

An interesting project that incorporates relevant social issues and educational opportunities within the context of a working farm...

Mercor's curator insight, January 16, 2013 6:43 AM

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Scatol8 ♥ nutella

Scatol8 ♥ nutella | scatol8® | Scoop.it
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The UK’s Most ‘Outstanding’ Green Building

The UK’s Most ‘Outstanding’ Green Building | scatol8® | Scoop.it

BREEAM is the world’s foremost environmental assessment method and rating system for buildings, with 200,000 buildings certified and around a million registered for assessment since it was first launched in 1990.


The largest commercial office in Manchester has now become the highest scoring BREEAM ‘Outstanding’ building in the UK with a score of 95.32%.

Designed by 3DReid, The Co-operative Group’s new £115 million low-energy, highly sustainable headquarters brings their 3,500 staff under one roof in a spectacular 500,000 square foot building.  

The building, known as 1 Angel Square, has been designed to deliver a 50 per cent reduction in energy consumption compared to The Co-operative’s current Manchester complex and an 80 per cent reduction in carbon. This will lead to operating costs being lowered by up to 30 per cent...


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GlazingRefurbishment's curator insight, December 21, 2012 4:42 AM

A hugely ambitious design concept. With so much glass however the control of the intenl environment will be a major challenge

association concert urbain's curator insight, December 21, 2012 6:20 AM

 

 

via Territori ‏

@Territori

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How an Industrial City Reinvented Itself as a Sustainability Hub

How an Industrial City Reinvented Itself as a Sustainability Hub | scatol8® | Scoop.it
The city of Nantes, the fifth largest in France, is a place of rich history dating back at least as far as the second century.  Economically, Nantes was long a port and shipbuilding center of considerable significance. 
But the shipping and shipbuilding industry in western Europe began a serious decline in the 1960s and 70s, and the last major shipbuilding facility in Nantes closed in 1986. 
The proud city needed a new identity in order to remain relevant. That new identity became, first, culture and then, sustainability. Today the two have come together in some highly innovative ways that have led the European Union to designate Nantes as its "Green Capital" for 2013.

The EU’s annual green designation was created by the European Commission in the last decade, with Stockholm selected as the first honoree, for 2010. The prestigious competition involves a lengthy application process and is judged on the basis of twelve overlapping environmental criteria:

Response to climate change
Transportation
Urban green spaces
Land use
Nature and biodiversity
Air quality
Noise pollution
Waste reduction and management
Water consumption
Wastewater treatment
Green municipal management
Dissemination of best practices

The 2013 award for Nantes included specific praise for the city’s efforts regarding climate, transportation, water, and biodiversity...
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, December 18, 2012 12:17 PM

Nantes is the fifth largest city in France and in it's earlier life was a hub for shipping and ship building. The proud city needed a new identity in order to remain relevant.  That new identity became, first, culture and then, sustainability.  Today the two have come together in some highly innovative ways that have led the European Union to designate Nantes as its "Green Capital" for 2013.

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The Center for Interactive Research on Sustainability at the University of British Columbia

The Center for Interactive Research on Sustainability at the University of British Columbia | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Located on a dense site next to ‘Sustainability Street’ at the University of British Columbia, the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability [CIRS] houses 200 researchers from private, public, and NGO sectors, who work together with the common mission of accelerating sustainability.

The 5,675m2 ‘living lab’ is organized around two four-story wings linked by a central atrium. The atrium serves as a building lobby and entry to a daylit auditorium, and as a social and educational space from which all of the project’s sustainable strategies are visible.

The CIRS building has embraced the ambitious sustainability goals of the Living Building Challenge, including those of net zero water consumption; waste water treatment on site; net zero energy consumption, and construction and operational carbon neutrality...
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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture

B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This hillside cabin in Japan by Anderson Anderson Architecture generates energy using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump.

 

Despite being surrounded by electricity pylons, this cabin by San Francisco firm generates all its own energy and heating using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump. Named B-House, the single-storey building is positioned on a slope overlooking Kumamoto.

The house was built on a tight budget and sustainability was key to the design. “The extremely modest budget required a close collaboration of the architects and builder to achieve a high quality, off-site fabricated timber frame construction meeting high sustainability standards,” explain the architects.

 

Read more about the sustainable features of this unique contemporary home and view more images at the article link...


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A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen | scatol8® | Scoop.it
How the world's wealthiest cities can beat back climate change.

 

From the Atlantic Cities:

 

Alex Steffen calls himself a planetary futurist. That means he has confronted some grim realities in the nearly 10 years since he founded Worldchanging.com, an online publication that pioneered coverage of climate change and related issues in the early years of the 21st century.  
He’s kept busy writing and speaking about creative, sustainable solutions that could help us find a way to survive and even thrive in the face of a planetary challenge that political leaders in the United States have been reluctant to face.
His most recent book, which comes out November 26, is called Carbon Zero: Imagining Cities That Can Save the Planet. In it, he lays out his case that "remaking the world’s wealthiest cities over the next 20 years may prove the best—perhaps the only—chance we have of avoiding planetary catastrophe."

I talked with Steffen the other day via Skype about post-Sandy climate politics, how to "ruggedize" a city, and whether we’re all doomed. This is an edited version of our conversation.


Visit the link for the article & interview...


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A Modular System for Sustainable Housing by Cso Arquitectura

A Modular System for Sustainable Housing by Cso Arquitectura | scatol8® | Scoop.it

SAMVS is a system of generation of industrialized open modular housing- the user can adapt it to his or her needs, and the product can be realized in a very short time with a fixed price and with the utilization of all kinds of sustainable systems.

Learn more about this efficient and innovative approach to green building at the link...


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Elisabeth Avalos's curator insight, October 18, 2013 11:55 AM

Vivienda sustentable

 

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The Solar Strand: A New Cultural Landscape

The Solar Strand: A New Cultural Landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it

In the interview with Robert G. Shibley, Domus investigates the process behind The Solar Strand, an innovative project designed by Walter Hood for the University at Buffalo campus.

The Solar Strand is sited among an extensive meadow regeneration area on UB’s North Campus. The mowing regimen, envisioned by Walter Hood and further developed with UB’s campus mowing crew, establishes a rhythm that continues from the Solar Strand and extends across the campus. In addition to a more efficient and sustainable approach to maintaining the campus landscape, the regimen has turned UB’s mowers into artists, designing as they cut...
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Sustainable Development for Green Health City in Hainan

Sustainable Development for Green Health City in Hainan | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Green Health City is an ecologically sustainable development designed to support and promote the condition of physical and emotional human health. Situated in China’s Hainan Province in Boao Lecheng on the Wanquan River, five island districts bring together world-class medical facilities, employ new strategies for green energy production and rethink transportation networking to achieve a sustainable urban prototype.


Pathways toward a sustainable future are forged through strong ties to local identity and respect for history. By establishing a cross-disciplinary and inter-cultural approach to design that is routed in China’s long history, a comprehensive and well considered scheme is achieved.


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ParadigmGallery's comment, June 14, 2013 12:26 PM
I really like the story and the holistic approach. It seems like a very comprehensive prototype and the Eastern philosophy it incorporates is very interesting...
ParadigmGallery's curator insight, June 14, 2013 12:28 PM

A balanced prototype for cities of the future....

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Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Cities are hotbeds of sustainability, right? From urban agriculture to social enterprise, you’ll find lots of innovative approaches in urban centers, particularly those on the US coasts. Put a lot of people together in one place, and you generate a lot of ideas.


You also generate a lot of heat, it turns out: a new study in Nature Climate Change argues that urban centers (particularly on coasts) generate a lot of waste heat… and that heat is contributing to the weird weather patterns we’ve been seeing lately. This isn’t climate change (in the way we’ve conventionally considered it), nor is it the “urban heat island” effect. Rather, according to the research team that authored the study...


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Gerry B's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:58 AM

About time something should be done on exhausts coming from cities. 

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:19 AM

I think this new research proves how much little things we do in the city, such as driving back and forth to a shopping mall everyday, effects the environment and impacts the weather. I live in Florida and I really don't want an even hotter summer when I go into the city, so I hope people (including myself) think about the environment and make better decisions when we are heading to town, like maybe riding a local bus from place to place or car pulling with friends. -RT

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, March 10, 2015 9:58 PM

This article really makes you think about how we take advantage of the opportunities for resource sharing offered in urban settings. I think people don't have to make a place hotter by generating heat. For instance instead of driving your car to work, you could ride a bike or a bus. -CB 

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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.


A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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MM house in Sao Paulo, Brazil by studio mk27

MM house in Sao Paulo, Brazil by studio mk27 | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Brazilian practice studio mk27 has completed the 'MM house' in Braganca Paulista, a wooded municipality of Sao Paulo.


The dwelling consists of two perpendicular rectangular footprints, and features a green roof that blends into the landscape.

A folding screen of retractable slender wooden slats wraps the entire envelope along the exterior glass wall, softening any direct sunlight, with all the bedrooms situated along the eastern elevation facing the valley. The indoor/outdoor gathering space is completely open to the elements where the solid building mass intersects with a wooden deck, allowing occupants to fully engage with the environment. The public living room and tv room at either side of this outdoor room contain large glass doors, enabling a strong visual connection among all the shared spaces.

The timber terrace extends out towards the lower area of the site, ending in a swimming pool upon a concrete plinth that reflects the picturesque environment.


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Libro Scatol8®: a Path To Sustainability | scatol8®

Libro Scatol8®: a Path To Sustainability | scatol8® | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Per cortesia riempite i campi sottostanti. Riceverete una mail con il link al file del libro.
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Scatol8: A Path To Sustainability, 3rd edition... Countdown

Scatol8: A Path To Sustainability, 3rd edition... Countdown | scatol8® | Scoop.it
scatol8's insight:

Within 24 hours the third edition of Scatol8: A Path To Sustainability will be on line. Keep watch over http://scatol8.net

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Common Spaces: Urbanism, Sustainability and the Art of Placemaking

Common Spaces: Urbanism, Sustainability and the Art of Placemaking | scatol8® | Scoop.it
As people become more engaged in the movement towards sustainable living, it stands to reason that they will first turn to the immediate environment. Outside the home, the debate is centered on the design and layout of community spaces; this is where placemaking offers valuable insights.

Placemaking, put simply, is the design of public spaces with the needs, desires, interests, and inspirations of the local community at heart. Frequently, this collaborative process can be found in what we might regard as a traditional, outdoor community area; a park or waterfront. However, as localism and sustainability take root within the priorities of decision-makers, we are also beginning to see community-minded design in more unconventional places. Ideal candidates for this new process include, for example, the layout and signage design for public service buildings such as police stations, hospitals and museums.

There are already some fantastic placemaking success stories. Indeed, the implementation of community-minded ideas is so widespread, it is difficult to pick out examples worthy of mention. The cutting edge of urban design is no longer where we design spaces with the public’s desires in mind; it is where we incorporate green thinking and technology into those spaces...
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Nelson Cultural Center: LEED Gold at the American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis

Nelson Cultural Center: LEED Gold at the American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The American Swedish Institute received a new addition with the LEED Gold-designed Nelson Cultural Center by HGA in Minneapolis.


The 34,000 sq ft addition provides space for education and cultural facilities for contemporary exhibitions, administrative offices, collections care, and expanded programs. Designed by locally-headquartered firm HGA, the new extension incorporates contemporary design, traditional Swedish aesthetics and a number of sustainable strategies. The Nelson Cultural Center is anticipating LEED Gold certification due to its sustainable building strategies, which include geothermal heating and cooling, a green roof and much more.


Sustainability was an important aspect of the design, and the institute anticipates LEED Gold certification for its efforts – which would make it the first museum in Minnesota with such accolades.


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University of Applied Sciences by BDG Architecten

University of Applied Sciences by BDG Architecten | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This building challenges the preconception of an exclusively formal climate for institutions of higher learning. Designed by BDG Architecten, the CAH University of Applied Sciences in Dronten (a school for agricultural studies) symbolizes a new educational vernacular.

In line with BDG’s programmatic doctrine, the overall design of the building is driven by a strong sustainable concept with the efficient use of sunlight, rainwater and clean air flow.
The solution was a 16-m-high greenhouse, inside which two buildings provide space for both people and plants. The greenhouse functions as a huge air duct, regulating ventilation through an integrated smart climate system. Passive cooling in the form of solar blinds and etched-glass panels prevents overheating in the summer. Rainwater is collected and reused to flush toilets and to clean the building.

The architects’ inside-outside juxtaposition of volumes. Composed of a skeleton of white steel trusses and modular glass panels, the outermost structure encompasses a pair of timber-clad buildings whose solidity cuts through the otherwise light-filled structure. The incorporation of vegetation at various places increases the flow of fresh air and further diminishes the sense of enclosure...


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MIT+MoDe Studio's Solar Tool v.2

MIT+MoDe Studio's Solar Tool v.2 | scatol8® | Scoop.it

"The Cambridge Solar Tool shows Cambridge residents, businesses, and property owners how much electricity can be produced on their rooftops from solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, how the financial investment will pay off, and how much pollution will be reduced. The Solar Map was developed by the Sustainable Design Lab at MIT and Modern Development Studio LLC (MoDe Studio) —a consulting, design, and development workshop based in Boston—, in collaboration with the City of Cambridge Community Development Department. MIT created the annual electricity yield map from PV for virtually all Cambridge rooftops, MoDe Studio designed and developed the online viewer as well as its financial and environmental modules, while the City of Cambridge provided the underlying data and images. Technical details can be found under the "Assumptions" tab. [...] Solar energy is a key strategy for Cambridge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and make the community more resilient to the impacts of climate change. The Cambridge Energy Alliance (CEA) program assists the community in taking the next steps toward installing a PV system."


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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...

 

Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


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