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Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut

Kengo Kuma’s Modern Interpretation of an 800-Year-Old Japanese Hut | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Kengo Kuma’s version of the humble dwelling is a transparent temporary shelter dubbed “Hojoan 800 years later” and it is currently on display at Kyoto’s Shigamo Shrine.

This modernized version of Buddhist monk Kamono Chomei’s portable hut immortalized centuries ago in the influential essay ”Hojo-ki” (“An Account of My Hut”).  ”Hojo-an After 800 Years,” on display at Kyoto’s Shimogamo Jinja Shrine, is a tribute to Chomei’s efficient home, often regarded as a prototype for Japan’s compact housing. Reflecting the mobility of the original structure, Kuma’s hut is constructed of ETFE sheets that can easily be rolled up. Working in combination with a cedar structure and powerful magnets, the soft architecture becomes a single, more structured unit.


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The 8 Level Rooftop Park in Osaka, Japan

The 8 Level Rooftop Park in Osaka, Japan | scatol8® | Scoop.it

When Osaka’s baseball stadium closed its doors, it opened the door to a prime redevelopment opportunity in a new commercial district adjacent to Namba Train Station, the first stop from Kansai Airport. Given the location, owner Nankai Electric Railway asked Jon Jerde to create a gateway that would redefine Osaka’s identity.
Jerde conceived Namba Parks as a large park, a natural intervention in Osaka’s dense and harsh urban condition. Alongside a 30-story tower, the project features a lifestyle commercial center (with 120 tenants) crowned with a rooftop park that crosses multiple blocks while gradually ascending eight levels.
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Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects

Materiality, Light + Thermal Control: House in Yamasaki by Tato Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Located in a residential area in Hyogo Prefecture, the house was designed for a family with two children. “The residents requested that, as the area has short hours of sunlight in winter, they’d like to bring in as much light as possible,” said Yo Shimada of Tato Architects.


More from the architects:

I wanted to create light, stable indoor climate and came up with a plan of three sheds of house type arranged on a 1.8 m high foundation platform. The first floor was lowered by 760 mm below ground to optimize the heating system and regulate temperature, while preserving views to the surrounding mountains and sky for the entire residential neighborhood.

The bathroom shed and the sunroom shed provide lighting and ventilation for the lower floor and form an overhead courtyard. The sunroom collects heat in winter, and exhausts heat in summer through the five motor-operated windows.

Corrugated polycarbonate panels are used for outer walls of the three sheds to take in solar radiation, with moisture and water-absorbing sheets between the panels and structure.The inside of the walls are formed with a heat insulating layer, and the ceiling and walls of bathroom are further filled up with light transmitting thermal insulation material of reproduced PET bottles.


A house appearing as small as a peasant’s work shed of an innovative material as corrugated panels creates a new vernacular in this agricultural area. Read the article and view more photos of this very unique house that connects new and old within the rural landscape.


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Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This translucent cabin by architects Kengo Kuma and Associates is an experimental house in Hokkaidō, Japan, designed to test the limits of architecture in cold climates.


Kengo Kuma and Associates were inspired by the traditional architecture of the indigenous Ainu, whose "Chise" style buildings clad with sedge or bamboo grass hold in the warmth of a central fireplace that is never allowed to burn out.

"The fundamental idea of Chise, 'house of the earth,' is to keep warming up the ground this way and retrieve the radiation heat generated from it," say the architects. The Experimental House was constructed around a coated larch frame and it has a thick layer of polyester insulation sandwiched between the polycarbonate cladding of the exterior and the glass-fibre fabric of the interior. This insulation was made using recycled plastic bottles and it allows light to pass into the house through the walls.

As the first experimental house completed for the Meme Meadows research facility, the building will be used by the environmental technology institute to test how different factors affect the thermal qualities of its construction.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:38 AM

There is a new group of trendsetters uniting architects, designers, tech guys and just curious-all-of us, creating new mashups that can turn into future trends some day

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Alaskan EcoEscape Permaculture's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:39 PM

Interesting green build????  It's certainly not a natural build though.

 

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B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture

B House in Shimasaki by Anderson Anderson Architecture | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This hillside cabin in Japan by Anderson Anderson Architecture generates energy using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump.

 

Despite being surrounded by electricity pylons, this cabin by San Francisco firm generates all its own energy and heating using photovoltaic panels and a ground-sourced heat pump. Named B-House, the single-storey building is positioned on a slope overlooking Kumamoto.

The house was built on a tight budget and sustainability was key to the design. “The extremely modest budget required a close collaboration of the architects and builder to achieve a high quality, off-site fabricated timber frame construction meeting high sustainability standards,” explain the architects.

 

Read more about the sustainable features of this unique contemporary home and view more images at the article link...


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