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Per rilevare e monitorare consumi energetici, temperatura, umidità e altre variabili ambientali
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Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste

Hot in the City: Reducing Heat from Urban Waste | scatol8® |

Cities are hotbeds of sustainability, right? From urban agriculture to social enterprise, you’ll find lots of innovative approaches in urban centers, particularly those on the US coasts. Put a lot of people together in one place, and you generate a lot of ideas.

You also generate a lot of heat, it turns out: a new study in Nature Climate Change argues that urban centers (particularly on coasts) generate a lot of waste heat… and that heat is contributing to the weird weather patterns we’ve been seeing lately. This isn’t climate change (in the way we’ve conventionally considered it), nor is it the “urban heat island” effect. Rather, according to the research team that authored the study...

Via Susan Davis Cushing, Lauren Moss
Gerry B's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:58 AM

About time something should be done on exhausts coming from cities. 

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, March 10, 10:19 AM

I think this new research proves how much little things we do in the city, such as driving back and forth to a shopping mall everyday, effects the environment and impacts the weather. I live in Florida and I really don't want an even hotter summer when I go into the city, so I hope people (including myself) think about the environment and make better decisions when we are heading to town, like maybe riding a local bus from place to place or car pulling with friends. -RT

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, March 10, 9:58 PM

This article really makes you think about how we take advantage of the opportunities for resource sharing offered in urban settings. I think people don't have to make a place hotter by generating heat. For instance instead of driving your car to work, you could ride a bike or a bus. -CB 

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Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development

Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development | scatol8® |

Rotterdam’s Floating Pavilion by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects is the first pilot project for a sustainable floating district.

In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor.

An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and Public Domain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture.

Via Lauren Moss
bancoideas's curator insight, January 3, 2013 1:34 PM

Que no se diga que no se puede

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 3, 2013 4:16 PM

Quel projet créatif!

ElenaArcausdeLabadie's comment, January 9, 2013 7:16 PM
Impresionante proyecto, qué tecnología constructiva!
Rescooped by scatol8 from sustainable architecture!

Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates | scatol8® |

This translucent cabin by architects Kengo Kuma and Associates is an experimental house in Hokkaidō, Japan, designed to test the limits of architecture in cold climates.

Kengo Kuma and Associates were inspired by the traditional architecture of the indigenous Ainu, whose "Chise" style buildings clad with sedge or bamboo grass hold in the warmth of a central fireplace that is never allowed to burn out.

"The fundamental idea of Chise, 'house of the earth,' is to keep warming up the ground this way and retrieve the radiation heat generated from it," say the architects. The Experimental House was constructed around a coated larch frame and it has a thick layer of polyester insulation sandwiched between the polycarbonate cladding of the exterior and the glass-fibre fabric of the interior. This insulation was made using recycled plastic bottles and it allows light to pass into the house through the walls.

As the first experimental house completed for the Meme Meadows research facility, the building will be used by the environmental technology institute to test how different factors affect the thermal qualities of its construction.

Via Lauren Moss
Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:38 AM

There is a new group of trendsetters uniting architects, designers, tech guys and just curious-all-of us, creating new mashups that can turn into future trends some day


Pedro Barbosa | |

Alaskan EcoEscape Permaculture's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:39 PM

Interesting green build????  It's certainly not a natural build though.


Rescooped by scatol8 from green infographics!

Paint By Particle: A Beautiful Climate Model By NASA

Paint By Particle: A Beautiful Climate Model By NASA | scatol8® |
With all of the satellites in our skies, NASA collects up to 30 million observations of the Earth each day.
But it is only when these observations are layered into one picture, called climate modeling, that we get to see the wispy beauty of our atmosphere. The video below, titled Paint By Particle, was published by NASAexplore and allows us to “watch as dust and sea salt swirl inside cyclones, carbon bursts from fires, sulfate streams from volcanoes—and see how these aerosols paint the modeled world.” Enjoy!
Via Lauren Moss
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