scatol8®
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scatol8®
Per rilevare e monitorare consumi energetici, temperatura, umidità e altre variabili ambientali
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Rescooped by scatol8 from Social Mercor
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Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic]

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic] | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Although 'moving season' — mid-May through mid-Sept. — is behind us, the folks at MyMove.com have some thoughts on how to haul all of your worldly possessions from points A to B with minimal eco-impact.

Via Flora Moon, Lauren Moss, Mercor
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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 8:38 AM

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Sustainable Futures

Rescooped by scatol8 from green streets
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A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen | scatol8® | Scoop.it
How the world's wealthiest cities can beat back climate change.

 

From the Atlantic Cities:

 

Alex Steffen calls himself a planetary futurist. That means he has confronted some grim realities in the nearly 10 years since he founded Worldchanging.com, an online publication that pioneered coverage of climate change and related issues in the early years of the 21st century.  
He’s kept busy writing and speaking about creative, sustainable solutions that could help us find a way to survive and even thrive in the face of a planetary challenge that political leaders in the United States have been reluctant to face.
His most recent book, which comes out November 26, is called Carbon Zero: Imagining Cities That Can Save the Planet. In it, he lays out his case that "remaking the world’s wealthiest cities over the next 20 years may prove the best—perhaps the only—chance we have of avoiding planetary catastrophe."

I talked with Steffen the other day via Skype about post-Sandy climate politics, how to "ruggedize" a city, and whether we’re all doomed. This is an edited version of our conversation.


Visit the link for the article & interview...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by scatol8 from Digital Sustainability
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Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment

Green and Healthy Buildings: monitoring consumption & ecology in the built environment | scatol8® | Scoop.it

According to the United Nations Environment Programme, buildings account for approximately 40 percent of worldwide energy use and are responsible for 30 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. They also play an important role in the health and wellbeing of those who inhabit them each day.

The mass of information about what makes a building green tends to concentrate on new and innovative designs that create beautiful photo spreads. While such examples are inspiring, they make up a very small percentage of all buildings in operation.

Green Buildings Alive is an environmental initiative aimed at collecting and sharing data on existing buildings between 10 and 60 years old. The data is collected from office towers in Australian Central Business Districts (CBDs) and shared on a public website.

 

For more on this innovative, environmental initiative that provides interactive visualizations of building-performance data to help understand the complexities and relationships among sustainability, health, and energy, read the complete article


Via Lauren Moss, Digital Sustainability
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Rescooped by scatol8 from green infographics
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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact | scatol8® | Scoop.it
The energy that powers the world comes mostly from coal, gas, and oil, and that’s led us to CO2 levels over 390 parts per billion now, and climate change. We can think of climate change as a design question: where do we want to end up? Impact studies tell us what will happen to the planet as we warm up—it's basically a litany of horrors. At a 1.5 degree increase, we'll lose 10 percent of species. At 2 degrees, we'll lose 90 percent of coral reefs. At 3 degrees, 1 to 4 billion people will face water shortages, leading to war across the planet. We need to each understand the basic math behind energy and climate change so we can reach the right solutions. We need a massive shift to renewable energy, and we also need changes in our everyday lives. One first step is understanding your own carbon footprint. 
Via Lauren Moss
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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:24 AM

It's strange how so many are concerned about leaving debt to the next generations, but unconcerned about leaving a compromised environment.

Mercor's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:58 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss onto green infographics

Electric Car's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:56 AM

What is YOUR Carbon footprint?

Rescooped by scatol8 from green infographics
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NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized

NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized | scatol8® | Scoop.it

With one of the best public transportations systems in the world, individual New Yorkers tend to have smaller carbon footprints than typical Suburbanites, but with a population of over 8.2 million, the carbon footprint for the city itself is pretty outrageous.


This visualization shows what it would look like if all of the carbon dioxide emitted from vehicles, buildings, factories, and people could be captured in “bubbles.” Each turquoise orb represents one ton of CO2, which would fill a sphere with a diameter of 33 feet, and as of now two are released every second in the Big Apple!

 

Stop by the link to view the animated infographic...


Via Lauren Moss
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