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10 places vying for the title of greenest building on the planet

10 places vying for the title of greenest building on the planet | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Take a look at some of the greenest buildings ever constructed

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Interaction and Collaboration: Saunalahti School by VERSTAS Architects

Interaction and Collaboration: Saunalahti School by VERSTAS Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

In the “Future School” educational activities will increasingly take place outside the traditional classroom and introduce new ways of learning.

Saunalahti school is a building tailored to support the pedagogical ideas of a forward-looking school. In its operation, the school puts special emphasis on new ways of learning, art and physical education and collaboration. The building supports these ideas by creating places for interaction of various scales and atmospheres.


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ESTAR's curator insight, July 29, 2013 11:41 AM

#arquitectura es deleitar la vista del futuro usuario

Annie Clarke's curator insight, October 14, 2013 8:21 PM

living in response to your environment

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Beautiful, Futuristic Hotel Designed To Cope With Rising Sea Levels

Beautiful, Futuristic Hotel Designed To Cope With Rising Sea Levels | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The Maldives may be swallowed up by rising sea levels in the future, but the architects at Deep Ocean Technology will build an underwater hotel to house its inhabitants. 

Called ‘The Water Discus’, this futuristic hotel has two circular discs which will house its 22 rooms, along with a restaurant, spas and lounges. 
The structure above ground will be connected to the structure below via a staircase and an elevator, where a bar and a diving center will also be located. 


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Jourdan Sumithio's curator insight, August 13, 2014 1:58 AM

What an awesome idea of giving tourists/travellers an unforgettable experience as they never experienced before. Great concept, design, and ideas for this hotel, however they may need to add up the capacity in the following future to add up more than 22 rooms. Overall the facilities they offered to tourists/customers are simply great, which allow people to enjoy the view around hotel as it's located at beautiful Maldives area. Maldives is well known as a dream destination place and a must visit at least once in life. By showing this brilliant and promising idea is a greater way to attracts more people to support and visit this hotel. However a reasonable price and good service are needed to keep the hotel's reputation rising in a further future.

Phuong Nguyen's curator insight, September 16, 2014 2:19 AM

This hotel is designed to cope with rising sea levels in Maldives. The concept of the hotel is very original compares to other underwater hotels. Based on the beautiful images, I believe in the future, this hotel will attract a lot of leisure guests who want to come for new experiments. This hotel is very suitable for adventurous people who want to organise a party or conference under water. However the owner of the hotel should carefully consider the impact of this hotel on the sustainability of the ocean and the safety of the construction.

Nguyen Quang Thai's comment, October 6, 2014 9:18 AM
It is great for building undersea hotels. It is a really creative idea for giving the visitors the pretty new experiences and beautiful views. In addition, there are many activities for people such as having a wedding under the beach, swimming at the early morning or watching the sea creatures. People could also have a great sleep because of its peaceful and quiet. For the facilities, the number of rooms should be improved due to the over demand. In addition, the undersea hotels could cause the pollution for the sea environment and threating the habitant of sea creatures. Therefore, they have to have a plan to protect the environment and sea creatures. On the other hand, there are many risks for staying under sea. As some nature disasters like tsunami, storm or some hit of big creatures like shark, people could get disturb and afraid. So, they should have an alarm, for example, to ring if there is a tsunami coming or having some nets to stop the big creatures far away. Lastly, glass cleaning is really important. As people staying, they do not want to see some moss stick in the glasses. Therefore, the hoteliers should be awareness in order to use some special glasses or have a way protect the wall.
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The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García

The Non Program Pavilion by Jesús Torres García | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Located in Spain, near the Mediterranean Sea, this small pavilion is surrounded by a remarkable landscape. The construction is defined by the relation between the landscape and the structure on the field.


The structure developed itself as a flower, subscribing to Oscar Niemeyer’s approach. The whole project has been composed in the concept of “how to build in natural landscape?” The non-program pavilion disappears in the landscape, attempting to erase the division between the intervention and the area. This concern of integration reaches the point where the landscape generates the architecture itself.


The non-definition of the program has a wide range of uses, such as providing environmental awareness, doubling as an exposition hall or music hall, and providing activities support for the wider community. The interior space is as free as the liberty of program, furnishing the space with the energy of each use...


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Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Meme Meadows Experimental House by Kengo Kuma and Associates | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This translucent cabin by architects Kengo Kuma and Associates is an experimental house in Hokkaidō, Japan, designed to test the limits of architecture in cold climates.


Kengo Kuma and Associates were inspired by the traditional architecture of the indigenous Ainu, whose "Chise" style buildings clad with sedge or bamboo grass hold in the warmth of a central fireplace that is never allowed to burn out.

"The fundamental idea of Chise, 'house of the earth,' is to keep warming up the ground this way and retrieve the radiation heat generated from it," say the architects. The Experimental House was constructed around a coated larch frame and it has a thick layer of polyester insulation sandwiched between the polycarbonate cladding of the exterior and the glass-fibre fabric of the interior. This insulation was made using recycled plastic bottles and it allows light to pass into the house through the walls.

As the first experimental house completed for the Meme Meadows research facility, the building will be used by the environmental technology institute to test how different factors affect the thermal qualities of its construction.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:38 AM

There is a new group of trendsetters uniting architects, designers, tech guys and just curious-all-of us, creating new mashups that can turn into future trends some day

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Alaskan EcoEscape Permaculture's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:39 PM

Interesting green build????  It's certainly not a natural build though.

 

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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.


A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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Preservation & Environmentally Responsive Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA and FUGA

Preservation & Environmentally Responsive Architecture: Villa Solaire by JKA and FUGA | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Revisiting traditional construction techniques, French architecture studios JKA and FUGA have converted an 1826 farmhouse into a luxury villa. Conceived as a sundial and exposed in its four façades to the path of the sun, Villa Solaire responds to its environment while maintaining historic integrity.

 

Located in the district of Pied de La Plagne, Morzine, France, the volume was singled out by the municipality as a landmark for traditional architecture.  Seeking to preserve its appearance while allowing light to enter the building, the architects used a traditional technique of decorative cut-outs within the uniform wooden cladding in a simple and contemporary pattern.


"Throughout the year, the surrounding roofs and buildings cast their shadows on the façades," state the architects. "The pattern within the cladding is designed to respond to the path described by these shadows". JKA and FUGA further explain that the house was conceived as a sundial, exposed in its four façades to the path of the sun: thus the name Villa Solaire...


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, December 29, 2012 6:12 AM

Arquitectura & Design Sustentáveis, sem fundamentalismos : Gosto!

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Fabián Salazar Bazúa's curator insight, March 11, 2013 7:07 PM

Ejemplo de la efectividad de las nuevas técnicas de construcción. Utilizando las energias renovables y alterando construcciones ya hechas.

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Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects

Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it
Lendager Architects announced their first prize win in the competition to build the first DGNB-certified housing project in Denmark in Næstved.

DGNB is a new green building certification system expected to become the scale for sustainability in Europe. DGNB-Certification focuses on three equally weighted parameters: Environmental-, Social- and economical sustainability, for a holistic evaluation of built projects.

In total, the project will have 24 single family homes, built around a shared courtyard to encourage community and shared resources. Passive solar design with optimized window and shade placement allows for passive cooling and heating. Energy efficient design, including a tight thermal envelope with energy saving systems reduces power consumption, while rooftop photovoltaics produce electricity. Green roofs protect the home and provide further insulation. A close connection with nature and gardens encourages residents to live off the land.

As Lendager Architects told us about the project, “We wanted to answer the questions of how we can build without affecting the environment, how we can build without using new materials, how we can build houses that produce more energy than they use, and how sharing becomes a natural part of the daily life.”
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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.


Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...


Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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Culture Forest: Community-oriented ecological design by Unsangdong Architects

Culture Forest: Community-oriented ecological design by Unsangdong Architects | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Unsangdong Architects have designed “Culture Forest”, a multi-use building and art center located in SeongDong-gu, Republic of Korea. The project is expected to be completed next year.


From the architects:

'The scenery looking at Seongdong will be as open as possible, providing a landscape of intensive and storytelling experience... Each program consists of an eco friendly and creative cultural space and green area. The skin of will unify architecture and nature through green walls and generates energy by solar powered panel skin.'


Visit the link to read the complete architect's description of the winning proposal for this new cultural development that integrates technology, ecology, and community...


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A Jungle Gym for City Sidewalks

A Jungle Gym for City Sidewalks | scatol8® | Scoop.it
A knotty lattice of colorful play-tubes is an intriguing use of a public space.


They say the city is an urban jungle. But an urban jungle gym? A\V Studio‘s new design for a spunky tubular playground at the foot of Morphosis’ Cooper Union New Academic Building proposes just that. "CMYPlay" is a knotty lattice of colorful play-tubes embedded in the ground floor of the Morphosis building, with crawl spaces wrapped around slanting columns and each other in a dense social thicket "befitting of Manhattan." The fanciful design is an appealing gesture and an intriguing use of what is virtually empty space.


An entry to the 3Dimensional Front,"CMYPlay" creates an interactive space outside the Milavec Hakimi Gallery at 41 Cooper Square. A\V Studio’s proposal "thickens" the facade by rehabilitating the underskirt area as an active social space within the local city fabric.

Burrowing visitors will (quite literally) run into strangers and colleagues alike, while the tops of the tubes can be street furniture. The clash of color and use of plastic are a pointed contrast to the details and surfaces of the Morphosis building. Also, the tubes could be recycled and sent to various playgrounds and schools to be re-used...


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Hotel Elqui Domos, Chile: Sitting lightly within the desert landscape

Hotel Elqui Domos, Chile: Sitting lightly within the desert landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Bordering the Atacama Desert in Chile’s Andes Mountains, Valle de Elqui boasts an abundance of natural assets including a stable, hot climate favorable for wine growing and postcard-clear skies, coupled with high natural magnetism for some of the best star gazing in the Southern Hemisphere.

Resting in the heart of the valley, Hotel Elqui Domos provides a unique eco-tourism accommodation experience through its spatial composition and relationship to place. The original complex was designed by architects Rodrigo Duque Motta as a series of seven geodesic dome tents.

Recently, the hotel has added four wooden cabanas, each intended as a private observatory and space for introspection. Perching very lightly on the landscape, the cabins negotiate the views of the valley and mountain from opposing sides. Their stilt-like foundations are sympathetic to the surrounding vegetation and topographical variations in the land, and the upper roof decks accentuate their privileged position within the site’s geography...


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Huangshan Mountain Village: sustainability grows in the Chinese landscape

Huangshan Mountain Village: sustainability grows in the Chinese landscape | scatol8® | Scoop.it

MAD has unveiled plans for a towering village of apartment blocks beside the Huangshan Mountains in eastern China. 


Inspired by the topographical layers of the landscape, the buildings will have organically shaped floor plates and will emerge from amongst the treetops on a site beside the Taiping Lake.

 

The high-density village features low-rise residences that echo the contours of the surrounding topography and offer unequalled access to one of China’s  landscapes.

The site of verdant scenery and limestone cliffs have long inspired artists and offered sheltered spaces for contemplation and reflection, contributing to its UNESCO Heritage status. Composed in deference to the local topography, the village provides housing, a hotel and communal amenities organized in a linked configuration. As its form evokes the geology of the region, the village blurs the boundaries between the geometries of architecture and nature.

For residents, the apartments will be a quiet retreat –  all have spacious balconies which overlook the lake. Communal amenities and walking paths encourage residents to explore the landscape. Each floor is unique and accessed from shared social spaces, creating a seamless balance between private and public spaces. The same serene design sensibility of natural environment extends to the interiors, with the use of local materials and the incorporation of plants and greenery enhancing comfort and well-being, while simultaneously setting up a closer connection with local culture...


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François Lanthier's comment, November 19, 2012 4:48 PM
Love it! Where do you find all thins great information?
association concert urbain's comment, November 19, 2012 4:55 PM
From www.dezeen.com
association concert urbain's comment, November 19, 2012 4:55 PM
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Blooming Bamboo Home: A Modular Solution for Emergency Housing

Blooming Bamboo Home: A Modular Solution for Emergency Housing | scatol8® | Scoop.it

H&P Architects from Vietnam provide an effective solution to emergency housing with this simple self-assembly home that can be mass produced at a minimal cost in a span of 25 days. BB (Blooming Bamboo) home is one solution to housing for millions of people in calamity-hit locations.

The prototype has just been completed last month in Cau Dien Town, Tu Liem District, Ha Noi, Vietnam. From a bamboo module, each house is simply assembled with bolting, binding, hanging, placing. The structure is strong enough to withstand 1.5m-high floods.


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jardinelviejito's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:52 AM

Con el uso de materia prima renovable se pueden lograr cosas asombrosas en cualquier lugar del mundo. La diferencia la hace la buena voluntad de las Instituciones y de la gente que maneja estas ideas, logrando así resultados que a todos nos parecen asombrosos, pero que en realidad lo que tienen de bueno es que se llevaron a cabo. 

¿Cuál puede ser tu aporte, tu granito de arena en este mar de ideas global?

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Geometric Inspiration + Green Building: Taiwan's Zero-Carbon Swallows Nest

Geometric Inspiration + Green Building: Taiwan's Zero-Carbon Swallows Nest | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Taking inspiration from a geometric möbius strip, architect Vincent Callebaut has designed an impressive new building for Taiwan's Taichung gateway park.


The Swallows Nest's form starts out with a triangle that is then rotated around an elipse. Reaching a height of eight-stories, the building will house shops, cafes, and an "endless patio" which opens up into the park and is found in the center of the structure. It will host a variety of art within the many interior galleries.

The Swallows Nest also features various eco-friendly features. The undulating roof will have a number of solar panels attached to it, while the building's glass construction allows for natural light to enter. Three vertical gardens are found in the park's center, with one at each arched entrance. Most impressively, there will be continued efforts to make the Swallows Nest a zero carbon emissions structure.


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Valerina's comment, June 29, 2013 2:43 PM
Nice :) Please follow me on Instagram :D : volletu
Hotels in Stansted's comment, July 1, 2013 11:21 AM
what a lovely building.. reminds me the Bird's NEst Beijing National Olympic Stadium..
Joram Walukamba's comment, July 3, 2013 7:48 AM
Love the exterior. I wonder how the interior would look like considering the thematic principles, creativity and artistic beauty of the design ... curious!!!
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Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living

Budapest Students Design Sustainable House for Indoor and Outdoor Living | scatol8® | Scoop.it

It may look unassuming, but this sleek black box is the culmination of a two-year long collaboration of more than 50 students from 7 different faculties of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics.


Initially envisioned by two architecture students and built for the European Solar Decathlon 2012 in Madrid, the goal of Odooproject was to encourage a new sustainable life by designing a house where as much time as possible can be spent outdoors.

Odoo’s square plan has two primary elements: the north half enclosure and the south half outdoor terrace, bordered by the ‘summer wall’ to the south. The design allows comfortable living inside or outside throughout the year as the seasons allow.

To provide a comfortable environment, as efficiently as possible, the house uses both active and passive systems. The compact form of Odoo reduces heat loss, while its organization means it has two south-facing facades. The glass façade exploits solar gain, to heat the interior during the winter, and the solar panels on the ‘summer wall’ generate power from the summer sun...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 6:26 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss onto sustainable architecture

bancoideas's curator insight, February 8, 2013 10:22 AM
Ideas para mejorar la vida
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Adaptive Reuse + Green Innovation: Lahas Zone Showrooms, China

Adaptive Reuse + Green Innovation: Lahas Zone Showrooms, China | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Recognized by united nations and world banks, the City of Yiwu houses the world’s biggest small goods market, having seemingly arisen over night, is now the center of trading for small goods in the world. The people of Yiwu, once workers on the farming fields dared to change their fates and stepped into the world of business and landed on success. “Breakthrough Innovations” is this city’s most valued essence.


The city strongly encourages young entrepreneurs, and with that in mind, the Lahas Zone was idealistically concieved and designed, centering a green enviroment that can incorporate services, offices, R&D and exhibitions all into living comfortably...


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Swooping Bamboo Structure Highlights Innovative Use of Local Materials

Swooping Bamboo Structure Highlights Innovative Use of Local Materials | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Using local materials, this impressive bamboo structure features a microcosm of imaginative spaces designed for a range of playful activities.

 

This incredible bamboo structure, by Dutch firm 24H-architecture, is part of the Soneva Kiri eco-resort on the island of Koh Kood, Thailand. Designed as a children's activity and learning center, the fantastic interiors are bound to impress even the most stoic grown-up.

Evoking the fluid shape of a manta ray, the center is located on a rocky slope overlooking the bay, with a large canopy of bamboo shingles sheltering the open interior of "mini-structures". The structure uses locally-sourced bamboo stalks of all sizes, ranging from the large main columns that are anchored into concrete footings to the other structural members that are grouped together using nuts and bolts and natural fiber lashings.


From the architects:

The design adopts all bioclimatic aspects to suits its humid tropical environment. The roof cantilevers up to 8 metres, acting like a big umbrella providing shade and protection from the heavy rains. The open design with the translucent elevated rooftop and setback floors allow a natural airflow inside and the use of natural daylight, limiting the building’s energy consumption.


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Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development

Rotterdam’s Solar-Powered Floating Pavilion is an Experimental Climate-Proof Development | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Rotterdam’s Floating Pavilion by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects is the first pilot project for a sustainable floating district.


In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor.

An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and Public Domain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture.


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bancoideas's curator insight, January 3, 2013 1:34 PM

Que no se diga que no se puede

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 3, 2013 4:16 PM

Quel projet créatif!

ElenaArcausdeLabadie's comment, January 9, 2013 7:16 PM
Impresionante proyecto, qué tecnología constructiva!
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Intelligent Shading System at Abu Dhabi's Al Bahar Towers

Intelligent Shading System at Abu Dhabi's Al Bahar Towers | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Abu Dhabi’s new inspiring architectural design might lead to even further research into the world of transforming interior and exterior environments with ingenious creativity. Al Bahar Towers housing the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters are now part of Aedas Architects' portfolio, rising tall to shape a new era in modern office building design. Inspired by a traditional Islamic lattice shading device named “mashrabiya”, the interesting geometric shapes enveloping the towers offer a powerful visual impact while intelligently protecting the interiors from excessive heat gain. Each of the 25-story high twin office towers in the United Arab Emirates will accommodate approximately 1,000 employees, who will be working in an inspiring, environmentally appropriate atmosphere...


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 24, 2012 11:46 PM

What a sight to behold and this article tells us more details of these amazing structures.

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Connected to the Landscape: Contemporary Home in Andros, Greece by Klab Architecture

Connected to the Landscape:  Contemporary Home in Andros, Greece by Klab Architecture | scatol8® | Scoop.it
The country house in the island of Andros sits on a remarkable site of hidden and evident beauty.
With the sloping topography dominant, architects had to follow the path between the trees and to execute a design that would maintain the site as much as possible. The decision was to create a very open house with a protected inner courtyard, designed to maintain privacy and to protect from the elements. The house is situated vertically, with stone retaining walls creating a barrier between the inner space and the country road, allowing views of the city and the sea.
Coming from dense cities, the design highlights the calmness and serenity of the countryside and allows inhabitants to be as close to nature as possible. Large windows bring the outside in, making this beautiful design a house for all seasons...
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Feed Your City: How Architecture and Farming Work Together

Feed Your City: How Architecture and Farming Work Together | scatol8® | Scoop.it

It’s easy to argue that architecture plays a part in the world of food; most restaurants are uniquely designed to better the dining experience after all. However, the architect’s ties to the industry go much deeper, and designers are beginning to revolutionize the way we see & manage food production.


As these cities grow, it is important that we continue to find new and innovative ways to provide for the populace. Vertical farming and urban agriculture offer relief in metropolitan environments, helping to reduce the pressure of public food supply while also changing our traditional approach to food production.


See 11 great examples at the article link...


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Gervais Fortin | Ecologia Montréal

Gervais Fortin | Ecologia Montréal | scatol8® | Scoop.it

Beyond green, healthy home. Ecologia Montréal is the first single dweling home in Montreal aiming for a Platinum LEED certification. The owner, Sabine Karsenti, with the collaboration of the Ecologia Foundation and her designer Gervais Fortin, had the objective to reduce to a minimum her ecological footprint by using healthy, local and little polluting materials. The team demonstrated that it’s possible to build an ecological house without sacrificing the contemporary design. All the materials were hand-picked from the most ecoresponsible supplier’s of Quebec. A combination of exposed beams, big windows and an inner courtyard, signs the beauty of a cozy and modern living space.


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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | scatol8® | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...

 

Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


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Sustainability in Sonoma: Green architecture at Stryker Sonoma Winery

Sustainability in Sonoma: Green architecture at Stryker Sonoma Winery | scatol8® | Scoop.it

This beautiful, family-owned winery on a 32-acre site in Geyserville, California is noted for its red wine offerings as well as its stunning surroundings and spectacular views, not to mention an architectural design that features green strategies and sustainability as key design elements.

Reflecting Stryker Sonoma's 'bold but thoughtful' philosophy, the design expresses this spirit with a distinctly contemporary aesthetic that references the rural characteristics of the site, creating continuity between the natural and built landscapes.

 

Designed by Sonoma-based firm Nielsen : Schuh Architects, the winery building incorporates sustainable strategies and passive design concepts at the 12,600 square foot working facility. An environmentally-responsive and site-inspired design serves the needs of the program with minimal development impact to the existing vineyards. The design also conveys the the winemaking processes that occur within it through the thoughtful application of local materials, the incorporation of varying levels of visual transparency, and an environmentally-sensitive site layout.

 

For more images and to learn more about this beautiful, sustainable destination in Northern California, check out the complete article at the link...


Via Lauren Moss
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