Sarcoma Dispatch
403 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Works for Spinal Sarcoma

"Carbon ion radiotherapy is a safe and effective method for treating unresectable spinal sarcomas, according to a retrospective analysis from one center in Japan. Spinal sarcomas account for no more than 13% of all orthopedic tumors, and the standard treatment has been en bloc resection. These are challenging procedures, however, and piecemeal resection can lead to a high rate of local recurrence. Radiotherapy of various types has also been considered for those patients, but doses are usually kept low, again limiting the amount of local control that is possible. Carbon ions, however, are heavier than protons and carry a greater probability of tumor control."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network | Sep 6, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Pazopanib Shows Promise in Phase I Pediatric Sarcoma Trial

"The multikinase angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib was well tolerated and exhibited some responses in pediatric patients with soft-tissue sarcomas and other refractory solid tumors in a phase I trial. The results of the study were published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors are generally used as drugs for renal cell carcinoma, according to Julia L. Glade Bender, MD, of Columbia University in New York City. 'Pazopanib, however, is also approved for the treatment of adult chemorefractory soft-tissue sarcomas,' she said in an email. 'Pediatric solid tumors, which are commonly mesenchymal origin, include the sarcoma family of tumors.' "

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network | Aug 8, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA, EMA Grant Orphan Drug Status to CGTG-102 for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

FDA, EMA Grant Orphan Drug Status to CGTG-102 for Soft Tissue Sarcoma | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA and the European Medicines Agency have granted orphan drug designation for CGTG-102, a granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor-coding oncolytic adenovirus for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. CGTG-102 (Oncos Therapeutics) originates from a modified GM-CSF-encoding adenovirus that selectively replicates in, and eventually eradicates, tumor cells. Upon tumor cell loss, newly synthesized viruses are then released to infect adjacent tumor cells. Concurrently, tumor antigens are exposed, stimulating a tumor-specific systemic response by the patient’s immune system, which further enhances the CGTG-102-induced production of GM-CSF in tumor cells."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio | Jul 31, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

mTOR Inhibitors May be Key to Treating Pediatric Cancers

mTOR Inhibitors May be Key to Treating Pediatric Cancers | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer typically arises in older adults due to decades of genetic mutations, but for pediatric tumors this is not the case. Researchers set out to explain why tumors develop in children and why those tumors become resistant to therapy. They discovered that inhibition of a feedback protein that normally suppresses rapid cell growth is a likely cause. Drugs that target a protein called mTOR could counter the effects of the suppression.


mTOR works with other proteins to regulate a key cancer-causing gene that tells cells to produce two forms of microRNA in excess. These microRNAs then restrict the ability of the molecule ATM to play it's usual role of initiating the damage control part of the cell cycle. Without this phase, the cancerous cells can continue to produce excess microRNAs along the mTOR pathway, further inhibiting the ATM checkpoint. The cells can then proceed to replication unhindered, allowing tumors can grow. Instead of gradual accumulation of genetic mistakes, pediatric tumors arise from an acceleration of cell growth without being stopped by the damage checkpoints; researchers therefore believe that targeting mTOR could effectively curtail tumor growth.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Extended Resection is the Best Treatment for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

Retroperitoneal sarcoma, a rare form of sarcoma originating in mesenchymal cells in muscle, fat and connective tissues, is best treated with extended resection, rather than simple resection. A retrospective comparison, a study examining prior cases, of the two surgery options revealed convincing data in favor of extended resection: a survival rate at five years of 70 percent versus 50 percent, a local control rate of 80 percent versus 50 percent, and a high rate of residual tumor discovery in simple resection patients who are candidates for a second, more extensive resection. While extended resection is the best option for this rare condition, experts stress that complementary strategies must be developed and utilized in order to improve long-term results for retroperitoneal sarcoma patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network | Jul 15, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Two Modifications Made to Phase III Sarcoma Trial

Two Modifications Made to Phase III Sarcoma Trial | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase III trial of the drug TH-302 will undergo two tweaks to provide researchers with a better picture of its benefits for patients with soft tissue sarcoma. TH-302 is activated by hypoxia—a low-oxygen environment that is common in many tumors. The drug therefore targets tumors while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. The first trial modification increases the study size from 450 to 620 patients. This change was made because of new research that suggests patients in the control group of the study – the group not receiving TH-302 – may live longer than previously estimated. Increasing the number of patients will give the researchers more certainty about the results of the study, whatever they may be. The second change eliminates a time-consuming safety and efficacy analysis step that would conflict with the study’s high rate of enrollment. The study’s safety will still be monitored by an Independent Data Monitoring Committee.

Cancer Commons's insight:

WSJ MarketWatch | Jul 1, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase IIb Trial of Chemotherapy Drug Reaches Enrollment Target

A phase IIb clinical trial of aldoxorubicin has met its enrollment target and will move forward. The trial will put aldoxorubicin head to head with doxorubicin, the standard chemotherapy drug that has been used for many years to treat sarcoma patients. Aldoxorubicin is made by CytRx, and is a doxorubicin spin-off that seeks to provide the same beneficial treatment without the harmful side effects. Doxorubicin may damage the heart muscle, and as a result cannot be administered at higher levels, which would increase the anti-tumor effect of the drug. In the study, aldoxorubicin will be delivered to patients in one group of the study at a dosage 3.5 times greater than the doxorubicin dosage given to the other group, as no health concerns have appeared at this high dosage. The study’s primary goals are improvements in tumor response and overall patient survival.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News | Jun 25, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Research Offers Blueprint for Targeted Treatment of Chondrosarcoma

Researchers investigated chondrosarcomas to identify what makes these tumors so resistant to chemotherapy drugs. They observed the activation of proteins called receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in chondrosarcoma cells, and also examined tissues for the presence of a mutation in the NRAS gene, as well as phosophorylation (the addition of a molecule called a phosphate group) of a protein called S6. The research revealed that NRAS mutations were present in about 12 percent of conventional central chondrosarcomas, and that S6 phosphorylation was present in 69 percent of conventional chondrosarcomas. Testing with the drug BEZ235, which inhibits a protein called PI3K, the researchers noticed impressive reduction in the growth of all cell lines. In addition, chondrosarcoma cells with NRAS mutations were sensitive to treatment with MEK inhibitors, which are designed to target a different cell growth-regulating protein, leading researchers to conclude that such treatment could be beneficial for patients with NRAS mutations.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Clinical Cancer Research | May 17, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Ridaforolimus Produces Tumor Shrinkage in Metastatic Sarcoma Patients

Ridaforolimus Produces Tumor Shrinkage in Metastatic Sarcoma Patients | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase III study has shown that the drug ridaforolimus (Taltorvic), a rapamycin inhibitor, delayed tumor progression and improved overall survival in patients with metastatic sarcoma. The study included 702 patients with stable disease who had previously responded favorably to chemotherapy; 90 percent had soft tissue sarcomas while 10 percent had bone sarcomas. 73 percent of participants had high-grade tumors and 5 percent had low-grade tumors; 60 percent also had lung metastases. The participants were split into two groups: one group received ridaforolimus while the other was given a placebo. The researchers found that the ridaforolimus group had a 1.3 percent decrease in tumor size, while the placebo group had a 10.3 percent increase; ridaforolimus also decreased mortality rate by 28 percent. Researchers said this was the first statistically significant study showing an effect on tumor progression in sarcoma patients from maintenance treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio.com | Jun 12, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Trabectidin Not Significantly Different from Doxorubicin in Sarcoma Treatment, Study Finds

Trabectidin Not Significantly Different from Doxorubicin in Sarcoma Treatment, Study Finds | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

In a phase III trial of sarcoma patients, the standard treatment option doxorubicin and a potential new anticancer agent trabectidin produced similar results. Of the 121 patients initially signed up, 88 were chosen for the study. They were split into two groups, one that received trabectidin intravenously and one that received doxorubicin. Each group also received ifosfamide as part of the first-line treatment. The researchers found that, between the two groups, overall time until cancer progression and overall survival time were not significantly different.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO University | Jun 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Sorafenib Could Be a Promising Treatment for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients

Sorafenib Could Be a Promising Treatment for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma Patients | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A recent phase II study tested the efficacy of the drug sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with leiomyosarcoma, angiovascular sarcoma, and other disease types. All 101 patients in the study had previously received an anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimen, and all patients were given 400mg sorafenib doses twice daily for 28 days. Researchers found that 14.5 percent of patients had a partial response, while 32.9 percent of patients reached stable disease. Sorafenib was most effective for the leiomyosarcoma patients in the study. The researchers noted that the drug was well tolerated, and advocated for further evaluation of sorafenib in histology-driven trials.

Cancer Commons's insight:

HemOnc Today | Apr 25, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Adding Ifosfamide to Doxorubicin Produces Mixed Results

Adding Ifosfamide to Doxorubicin Produces Mixed Results | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Combining ifosfamide, an intravenous component of chemotherapy, with the intravenous drug doxorubicin slowed the advance of advanced soft tissue sarcoma, but did not improve overall survival, according to a phase III study. Researchers split patients into two groups. One received a combination of the two drugs, while the other received only doxorubicin. The study found that overall survival at one year among the combined group was just nine percent higher than the doxorubicin group, though the combined group’s median progression-free survival was nearly three months longer. The addition of ifosfamide also made the treatment more toxic. Researchers said that a high response rate for the combination group indicates that the combination could be used in select patients under age 60 for tumor shrinkage if critical, but noted concerns about toxicity.

Cancer Commons's insight:

OncLive.com | Oct 2, 2012

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Regorafenib May Improve GIST Treatment

Regorafenib May Improve GIST Treatment | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is normally treated with two oral drugs, imatinib (Gleevec) and sunitinib (Sutent), the only FDA-approved drugs proven to control the condition. Unfortunately, GIST eventually becomes resistant to these drugs in 85 percent of patients. Researchers looking for another treatment conducted a phase III study in November and found that regorafenib, another oral drug, continued to control GIST for almost four more months after the tumor became resistant to the primary treatment. Regorafenib was originally introduced as a kinase-targeting drug to treat metastatic colon cancer after failure of standard chemotherapy. GIST is a rare form of sarcoma, affecting approximately 5,000 people per year in the U.S.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Daily | Nov 21, 2012

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Carbon Ion Beam Tx Effective in Spinal Sarcoma

Carbon Ion Beam Tx Effective in Spinal Sarcoma | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Radiotherapy with carbon ions is a safe and effective treatment for people with inoperable spinal sarcomas, researchers reported. In two early-stage clinical trials, more than half of patients remained alive 5 years after treatment and more than three-quarters still had local control of the tumor, according to Reiko Imai, MD, PhD, of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan, and colleagues. The treatment was especially effective in patients with small-volume spinal sarcoma or those located away from the spinal cord, Imai and colleagues reported online in Cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Aug 12, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Loss of MicroRNA Decoy Might Contribute to Development of Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

Loss of MicroRNA Decoy Might Contribute to Development of Soft-Tissue Sarcoma | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism responsible for the loss of a critical tumor-suppressor gene in rhabdomyosarcoma and other soft-tissue sarcomas, rare cancers that strike mainly children and often respond poorly to treatment. Their cause is largely unknown. Knowledge of the mechanism could guide the development of more effective therapies for these malignancies, say researchers who led the study at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James)."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The James | Aug 6, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

The Worst K9 Osteosarcomas May Not Be Driven By The Expected Pathway

The Worst K9 Osteosarcomas May Not Be Driven By The Expected Pathway | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

NOTCH is a cell signaling pathway that frequently displays inappropriate activation in many types of cancer. In a healthy person, NOTCH is active in cell growth and cell division in the body’s developmental stage, but then falls silent in adults. However, cancer is able to reactivate NOTCH for its own purposes, helping tumor cells grow and divide rapidly. A recent study found that levels of NOTCH activation were elevated above normal levels in samples of K9 osteosarcoma tumors, but the worst tumors actually had deactivated NOTCH pathways. After dividing the samples into two groups, based on how well the patients responded to treatment, the researchers analyzed the tumors for the protein HES1, which indicates the activity level of NOTCH – high HES1 levels mean that NOTCH is active, and vice versa. The researchers were surprised to discover that low levels of HES1 were found in patients who responded poorly to treatment and had the more aggressive tumors. One possible explanation is that a second signaling pathway drives the aggressive tumors, and that pathway interferes with the levels of HES1 that would be typically dictated by NOTCH.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jul 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase II Trial Successful for Rare Form of Sarcoma

Phase II Trial Successful for Rare Form of Sarcoma | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase II trial of moderate dose radiotherapy has returned promising results in patients with inoperable desmoid-type fibromatosis, a rare type of tumor. Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a soft tissue tumor that usually occurs in patients between the ages of 30 and 40. It can recur frequently but does not metastasize. The trial, conducted by the EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) had 44 participants; over the three-year period six patients achieved complete disappearance of their cancer, 16 patients achieved partial disappearance, and 18 patients achieved stable disease, while three patients experienced disease progression. The researchers noted that the effects of the radiotherapy were slow to take effect, and that continuing regression was seen even after three years of treatment. The researchers said the results of the trial were significant, because radiotherapy is not usually a preferred treatment option for younger patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jul 18, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Nonsurgical Oncology Specialists Perform Nearly Half of Sarcoma Surgeries

Nonsurgical Oncology Specialists Perform Nearly Half of Sarcoma Surgeries | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Orthopedic and surgical oncologists, doctors trained specifically to remove cancerous tumors and sarcomas located deep in soft tissue, performed only 52 percent of all surgical procedures involving sarcoma at 85 academic medical facilities over a three-year period. The remaining 48 percent of sarcoma operations were handled by general surgeons, plastic surgeons and orthopedic surgeons. This large percentage of non-specialist operations means that proper sarcoma tumor removal technique might not be frequently used, leading to a greater chance that cancerous cells could be left behind in the body and form additional tumors down the line. Secondary tumors require further surgery and can affect survival time and induce surgical complications for patients. The researchers hope the findings will help surgical centers to aim to provide a higher quality of care.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jul 8, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

“Obamacare” Offers Help to Sarcoma Patients

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”) includes several provisions that should benefit sarcoma patients. The healthcare reform law seeks to reduce the number of people who are uninsured; to do so it will establish government-run exchanges in each state, where people who previously could not afford private insurance will be able to purchase an insurance plan. In addition, insurance companies will not be allowed to discriminate based on pre-existing conditions (like sarcoma), and children will be eligible to remain on their family’s health insurance plan until age 26. This increase benefits sarcoma patients because sarcomas account for 15 percent of child cancers, and those who are now cancer-free still require periodic check-ups.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Sarcoma Alliance Blog | Jun 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

NBTXR3 Shows Positive Results in Phase I Trial

After conducting a phase I trial, researchers say that the nanoparticle-based drug NBTXR3 was tolerated safely by the 27 soft tissue sarcoma patients who signed up for the study. NBTXR3 is injected into a tumor prior to receiving radiation therapy. The drug’s particles, which contain hafnium oxide, emit large quantities of electrons during radiation, enabling the drug to damage the cancer cells and lead to targeted cell destruction. The results of the trial found that the nanoparticles did not leak from the tumor area into surrounding healthy tissue, and were well-dispersed within the tumor. The particles do not emit electrons unless they are undergoing radiation therapy. No serious adverse events were reported during the course of the study. Nanobiotix, the creators of NBTXR3, noted that the results were a sign of NBTXR3’s potential as a successful, localized, safe treatment for soft tissue sarcoma patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Nanobiotix | Jun 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Giant Cell Tumor of the Bone

FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Giant Cell Tumor of the Bone | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

The FDA recently expanded the approved usage for Xgeva (denosumab) to include treatment of adults and some adolescents with giant cell tumor of the bone. Previously, the monoclonal antibody had been approved in 2012 as a treatment to prevent fractures in patients whose noncancerous tumors have spread to their bones. Giant cell tumor of the bone is a rare, usually noncancerous condition in which normal bone is destroyed, leading to fractures and pain. Most patients are between the ages of 20 and 40. In a study, a quarter of patients who took the drug showed signs of tumor shrinkage after three months. Xgeva binds to and inhibits a protein involved in breaking down bone, and will be used primarily in patients with unresectable tumors or whose resections would require loss of a limb.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio.com | Jun 13, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase II Alisertib Trial Looking for Participants

Phase II Alisertib Trial Looking for Participants | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

An upcoming phase II trial will examine the efficacy of alisertib, an oral drug that selectively inhibits the protein Aurora Kinase A (AURKA). Overproduction of AURKA in cancer cells may explain the recurrence of cancer in advanced or metastatic sarcoma patients who have already undergone primary surgery. The trial’s leaders are still looking for participants, who will be divided into five categories based on their form of the disease: liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and other. Participants will receive alisertib orally until their disease progresses or they experience unacceptable toxicity. The main goal (primary endpoint) of the study is tumor shrinkage or disappearance in a significant percentage of patients. Secondary endpoints will be survival without disease progression and overall survival.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO University | Jun 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Amrubicin Could be Effective Treatment for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Amrubicin Could be Effective Treatment for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase II study showed that the drug amrubicin has potential as an alternative first-line treatment to doxorubicin, the standard treatment against advanced soft tissue sarcoma. The study tested 15 patients by administering amrubicin directly into the bloodstream for six cycles at a dosage of 40 mg/m2. Three patients experienced a partial response; the best result showed a 78% reduction of the target lesions. Four patients achieved minor reduction of target lesions (11-28%) or stable disease, four patients had minor disease progression, and two patients experienced progression of more than 20%. Researchers note that amrubicin is significantly less cardiotoxic than doxorubicin, and recommended the drug for further testing.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO University | Jun 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Microwave Ablation Is Potentially Effective in Treating Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumor Pain

Microwave Ablation Is Potentially Effective in Treating Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumor Pain | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Results from a small study show that microwave ablation therapy (MWA) can reduce pain associated with bone and soft tissue tumors by half in a majority of patients treated. Microwave ablation is the use of microwave energy to heat up and kill cells. In the study, each participant received 20 MWA treatments via small probes inserted directly into the tumor. Patients reported pain relief of as much as 50 percent following the treatments, and the relief lasted for an average of 4.36 months. Researchers noted that this therapy is advantageous in that the pain relief comes instantly, whereas pain relief following other techniques such as radiotherapy is delayed. The therapy is intended to be used in a palliative setting, and would require further research before being used as a curative treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

OncLive | Apr 15, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Three-fold Improvement in Progression for Sarcoma Patients in Study

Three-fold Improvement in Progression for Sarcoma Patients in Study | Sarcoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A study found that the drug pazopanib slowed the progression of advanced soft-tissue sarcoma in patients by three months, compared to a placebo. It was the first phase III study to show improvement in progression-free survival for patients with advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. However, the drug did not significantly increase the overall survival time of patients compared to the placebo. Pazopanib targets the growth of new cancer-related blood vessels, and had already been approved to treat kidney cancer. The drug has multiple side effects, including fatigue and diarrhea; 14 percent of patients had to receive lower dosages because of toxicity concerns. Researchers said the encouraging result will open new doors for further clinical trials.

Cancer Commons's insight:

European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer | May 16, 2012

more...
No comment yet.