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Tumor suppressor gene TP53 mutated in 90 percent of most common childhood bone tumor

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital—Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project finds TP53 gene is altered in nearly all osteosarcomas; results help explain how tumors withstand radiation therapy.
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Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct - Lund University

Nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct - Lund University | sarcoma | Scoop.it
Lund University, Sweden, is ranked as one of the world's top 100 universities. We have over 90 international Master's programmes and world class research across eight faculties. We are the number one choice in Sweden for both Swedish and international students...
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The technology sounds interesting but the article does not explain how the nanoparticles enter only cancer cells and not healthy ones.

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Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop - News Center

Fighting cancer with lasers and nanoballoons that pop - News Center | sarcoma | Scoop.it
Showcasing University at Buffalo research and academic accomplishments, UB's News Center provides faculty experts, the latest news, video and photos.
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Question: can the laser penetrate deep inside the body or is this only for tumors close to the surface?

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Rescooped by Elodie Espesset from Sarcoma Research Digest
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Targeting the Wnt Pathway in Synovial Sarcoma Models

"Synovial sarcoma (SS) is an aggressive soft tissue malignancy of children and young adults, with no effective systemic therapies. Its specific oncogene, SYT-SSX (SS18-SSX), drives sarcoma initiation and development. The exact mechanism of SYT-SSX oncogenic function remains unknown. In a SYT-SSX2 transgenic model, we show that a constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signal is aberrantly activated by SYT-SSX2, and inhibition of Wnt signaling through the genetic loss of β-catenin blocks SS tumor formation. In a combination of cell-based and SS tumor xenograft models, we show that inhibition of the Wnt cascade through co-receptor blockade and the use of small molecule CK1α activators arrests SS tumor growth. We find that upregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade by SYT-SSX2 correlates with its nuclear reprogramming function. These studies reveal the central role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SYT-SSX2-induced sarcoma genesis, and open new venues for the development of effective SS curative agents."


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Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 8, 2013 3:01 PM

Barham W, Frump A, Sherrill T, Garcia C, et al. Cancer Discovery. Aug 6, 2013.