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Sarah's Key

Sarah's Key | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup, but n...
Maddison's insight:

July 1942, the Jew round up was in progress and was traveling from Germany to France. It starts out with this jewish family in Paris that is in the process of being taken somewhere else. The girl, Sakri (Shara),  that is the highlight of the story is confused and tired, it was early/ late in the morning when she first heard the banging. The banging on the door from the police, at first she thought it was her father who had forgotten his key and was now getting impatient, but she was wrong. She heard voices, they started yelling police open up! and then she knew that something wasn't right. After her mother wakes up and the police are inside they are told to gather their things and that they have to leave. As the little girl is gathering her things her brother hides in the hidden closet, telling the sister to lock him in and that it'll be all right. So, the sister does. She locks him in the closet and promises that she will be back for him, not understanding that she wont be back...that this was the end.
Then, the next chapter switches. The chapter switches to May 2002 in Paris. with an American reporter, Miss Jarmond,  as the main attraction. She is living in Paris, married, and with a family. She has a job as a reporter and her new piece is about the round up. She gets into close detail, finding things out that no one knows about. Her topic is called the Vel' d'Hiv'. Its about the round up that happened with the french police. People normally only know about the round up with the German police. As the book goes on you learn more about the struggle the girl faces while dealing with the guilt of leaving her brother and about her struggle to survive. And the reporter learns things that she would have never believed to be true about Paris.
Throughout the book it switches every chapter from child to reporter. Later in the book, Miss Jarmond, the reporter is interviewing an elder woman who had witnessed the roundup. The reporter proceeds to ask if she remembers anything and the elderly woman had  reaction that the reporter wasn't expecting, "You think I don't remember, young lady? You think I have forgotten, maybe?" (Rosnay 41). With this the reporter knew that she was wrong. The woman then proceeded to tell the reporter how she had remembered the children's faces, how they looked, and how uncomfortable she felt.55
Switching from character to character each chapter happens through out the book and it helps you understand both parts of what happened, how it happened, and what it feels like to be learning a scary past and learning how the jews felt. There's nothing easy about this book, nothing light about the book. You learn that The reporter is living in the house that the jew family lived in. After that she becomes obsessed with learning everything possible. There is also another life altering instance when Miss Jarmond and her husband, Bertrand, are out to dinner for a special surprise that Miss Jarmnod is very very excited for! as it states in the book, "Yes, 'I said raising my glass.' A very special surprise. Drink up! Here's to the surprise?" You find out that she is going to have a baby and that she wants it more then the world! But Bertrand disagrees, He does not want a baby. As he says in the book "Julia. I'm going to be fifty in less than three years...I dont want to be an old father." This explains how they are not understanding each other anymore. With this happening in the book it makes you realize that not everything is going to be okay.

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Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation | Chemins de Mémoire - Ministère de la Défense - Ministère de la Défense

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation | Chemins de Mémoire - Ministère de la Défense - Ministère de la Défense | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation :   Inaugurated on 12 April 1962 by General de Gaulle, then President of the Republic of France, the Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation is a memorial to the 200,000 people deported from Vichy France and evokes certain characteristics of the concentration camps: imprisonment, oppression and impossible escape, the long process of attrition, the desire for extermination and abasement. Designed by the architect Georges-Henri Pingusson, the vast, hexagonal, dimly-lit crypt opens onto the gallery covered by luminous rods representing the deported people killed in the camps and the ashes of an unknown deportee from Natzweiler-Struthof camp.   Either side of the crypt, two small galleries contain earth from the different camps and ashes brought back from the cremation ovens, enshrined in triangular urns. All around, the names of the camps and excerpts from poems by Robert Desnos, Louis Aragon, Paul Eluard, Jean-Paul Sartre and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry are inscribed in red characters.   Every year, on the last Sunday of April, the Memorial is visited in honour of the National Day of Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of the Deportation.
Maddison's insight:

The website talks about The memorial on Ile de la Cité, in Paris. The memorial was built there for the memory of what happened in Paris during World War II. The website talks about the design of the memorial is a hexagon that is dimly-lit. It also explains how there is a crypt that opens to the gallery which represents the deported people. There are also triangular urns with earth from the different camps and ashes from the cremation ovens, the ashes are unknown. In red characters there are inscriptions of poems and the names of all the camps. It also goes on to talk about how every year the last sunday of april they have a special visiting day. this day is to be visited in honor of the National Day of Remembrance of all the victims and heroes of deportation.

This can be connected to my book because in my book it talks about how the reporter visits where an old camp was and how she visits different memorials. She goes on to explain how at one memorial there is nothing posted about the history of what happened there, but the website goes to explain how the french people have changed and want people to come visit. In the novel it also explains how the french people would much rather forget then own up to what had happened. As julia the reporter is talking to an older woman the older woman goes on to say: "No. You'll see. Nothing has changed. Nobosy rememberd. Why should they? Those were the darkest days of our country." (Rosnay 69). This here shows how the people would never change, that they would never remember what happened, and that they would never care. As the article states there is a special visiting day "Every year, on the last Sunday of April, the Memorial is visited in honor of the National Day of Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of the Deportation." This shows that people have changed and want to learn more about their history.

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"Vel d'Hiv" Children

"Vel d'Hiv" Children | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Maddison's insight:

This photo is the "Vel' d'Hiv" roundup of the children from France. This shows how realistic it was and how terrifying it was for everyone. The picture brings you back to when, where, and what was going on.

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Memorial

Memorial | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Maddison's insight:

This is a small memorial for the jew roundup. The statues show the fear in the couple, the loneliness in the child, and the togetherness of the family in the upper corner. It shows that they have hope within each other, holding each other, and also by being alone.

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Divorce is Unfair!

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This article goes on to explain how divorce is unfair to woman and how there are many reasons for divorce to occur. In the article it explains how families might not want to get divorced because of children in the marriage and because they do not want to live alone. It also explains the after math of a divorce. It says that many woman would not mind living or being with a divorced man. Like I said before, the article explains that there are many reasons for a divorce to occur and that there is a law that protects woman from being completely "empty". It goes on to explain how the law claims to protect the woman through "maintenance". But for some that is not what they need, they do not need the financial help but they need the presence of being a complete family. The article then proceeds to talk about bringing marriage education to school, just like there is sexual education the students should be taught about marriage including divorce. It should teach them the financial cost of splitting up, how it effects the children, how the paternal role, and the jobs of each family member.

Now this article of divorce connects to my novel because as you read you learn that Julia becomes pregnant and with her becoming pregnant could make or break her marriage. A little explanation is that when Julia tells her husband that she is pregnant he does not react the way that she thought he would. He is more upset than anything, he doesn't want to be an old father and expects her to get an abortion. An abortion can be an option but Julia it is not. It is not an option because she had miscarriages and was hoping at an actual attempt of being a mother. Now relating to the article, it goes on to explain that divorce can happen because of many reasons and that most families do not split because there is another child and they need that feeling of a compete family. Connection is, is that Julia sets up the date for the abortion because she is constantly thinking about Zoe, her other child, and how it will all effect Zoe. But in the novel it also states that Julia is not 100% sure about getting the abortion. Because the abortion is brought up it goes on to explain that this is the reason that they split. in the book it states "When i told you I couldn't face this child, I meant it. You've made up your mind. Fine. Now this is my decision. I need time to myself...Then we'll see how things go. Maybe by then, I can come to terms with this pregnancy. If not, we'll get a divorce." Now with this statement you can obviously tell that her husband can not handle this, but Julia is ready for this. The novel also connect to the article because Julia says: "the only thing that matters now is Zoe. whatever happens, we will have to talk to her, you and I. We will have to prepare her. We have to d this right" (Rosnay 205). This shows that Julia wants to explain everything to her other daughter so that Zoe can fully understand that this divorce wont be the end of the word. Divorce can happen for many reasons, but with the right help all of them do not end badly.

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France 1942/2002

France 1942/2002 | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Maddison's insight:

Go back in time to 1942. World War II was on the rise and the jew roundups have already begun.

Fast forward to 2002 and take a step in the reports shoes. It's years after Worl War II and without any knowledge you would never believe that the French police helped the German police.. Everyone is in denial and chooses not to remember.

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Gun man

Gun man | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Maddison's insight:

The above picture shows how strict the roundup was. They had patrols with guns making sure no one tried to escape. The faces in the back show the fear and also show how straight faced they must stay. They wish not to show fear.

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The Reporter's Privilege Compendium: An Introduction | Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press

The Reporter's Privilege Compendium: An Introduction | Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press | SarahsKey-Hayes | Scoop.it
Maddison's insight:

The article starts off by explaining how an unpublished author was working on a book that was about how an American Jourlalist went to jail for 168 days because she would refuse to give over the information to a murder case. It then also goes on to explain how the American Jounalist went to jail because "the federal judge overseeing the grand jury found that ther was no reporters privilege..." It the goes ont o explain how many reporters and their lawyers often dont have access to the best information. Above the law is aportiuonb that goes on to talk about the reporters privilege suffers from an image standpoint also. It also states that people offten look at reporters with the mindset of that all reporters believe that they are above the law. The real question is how and why? The article goes on to explain how reporters rely on confidential sources. It then goes on saying that there are certain job industries that allow confidential files such as doctor-patient and lawyer-client. But the lawyers have a much smaller zone to work in. As clearly stated in the article reporters do not believe that they should have any difference between themselves and a confidential source.

Now in my book it is clear how my reporter gains her knowledge. She does research online, in articles, with other people, and of course asks her boss for any help needed. There is one part of the book when she asks her boss to find a name of a family, she doesn't state why she needs the name just that she needs to know. The boss of course helps her but tells her to be cautious with her findings. Connecting it to the article both show how information does not just come out of the sky and that reporters are passionate about what they do. The entire novel shows how passionate Julia is in finding out what happened, how it happened, and why it happened. In the article it explains that a reporter was sent to jail because of her work and all she had to do was give them information.

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Paris Travel Video Guide - YouTube

Paris is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. First established by the Celts, next used strategically by the Romans, then it served the extravagant...
Maddison's insight:

The film starts off talking about how Napoleon constructed monuments to remember him. It goes on to explain how Paris was established and then furthermore used for different reasons. It was established by the Celts, then used by the Romans, "then it served the extravagant lifestyle of Sun King, Louis XIV until it became the hotbed of revolution." It goes on to talk about the busy life of Paris and the "city" part of Paris explaining how the sculptures there are still being modified to meet the standard modern day look. The video also talks about the "Champs- Elysee" which is the busiest avenue. It talks about the "shady corners, wide boulevards, ambient street cafes, and how busy it is. The film then goes on to talk about the churches and how "the 'Mother Church of the Nation', the Catherdral of Notre Dame, took 200 hundred years to complete." The Film goes on to talk about the garden that is the most popular park in all of France. 

Now in the book it goes on to talk about how Julia "was never very good at driving stick shift cars, like most Americans" because she had never really had to use a car when she had easy access to the trains, subways, taxis, and walking because everything was close enough. The reporter then talks about how she dislikes the setting of Paris, meaning that she dislikes the "surge of high-rise modern buildigs that disfigured banks of the seine just next to the Eiffel Tower" (Rosnay 59). This explains how even though she is from america, most americans are not used to the city building and are not found of them. But this connects to the film because the film talks about the "city life" of Paris and explains about the shady corners and busy streets. What you can not connect to the film from the book is the building that is in place for what happened during World War II.

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The Forgotten Children

Maddison's insight:

There’s this feeling that the article gives off at the beginning, talking about how “(They Were Children)”. Making you feel remorse and sadness. It explains how there are exhibits that “come from the knowledge of how soon many of the kids were to be sent to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps.” The roundup is now known as the “Vel d’Hiv”, which comes from the “Velodorme d’Hiver in the citys 15th Arroundissment housing the detainees.” It then proceeds to talk about numbers of 4500 French police officers rounded up 12,884 jews, including 4015 children. Now doing the math, that means that a little less the half were children. It also talks about how a total of 76,000 Jews were deported and more than half of the 11,400 children sent to the gas chambers were from Paris. This sets the tone to be dark and heavy which makes me personally want to go back and help. In one sentence it talks about how there is a poem hanging on the wall that reads the first sentence to say “my fathers dead, my mothers dead…” How can one hear that and not want to know more? The article then proceeds to talk about the exhibition itself. Explaining how the French were in denial, not accepting their past. But not all of the Jews died, some of them avoided death and deportation by the efforts of religious organizations and groups. It also explains how the limitations were out past Paris but extended to central and south central France. Here is says children had joined the refugees from Spain, Italy, Poland, and even Germany.

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Gianna Marra's curator insight, May 28, 2014 9:57 AM

This article seemed to be very sad and hard to read, If I got told my parents died or I had to live in a different area then them as a young child I do not think I could handle it. These children were very strong to do this and be able to stay positive. These kind of stories really incourage me.