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The Body-Brain Connection: Does Your Sedentary Lifestyle Damage Your Writing Talent? - Writer's Relief, Inc.

The Body-Brain Connection: Does Your Sedentary Lifestyle Damage Your Writing Talent? - Writer's Relief, Inc. | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Learn how a writer with a sedentary lifestyle and desk job can improve creativity and health through mild exercise.

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5 Tips to Create a Page-Turning Plot

5 Tips to Create a Page-Turning Plot | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

A couple of months ago, a fellow writer whom I’d met on Facebook sent me a message about my second novel that began: “I just read the prologue to Cadaver Blues. Wow. Straight into the story and already hooked.”

 

Both of these interactions — and others like them — have left me smiling over the past eighteen months. They’re gold for an author. More important than money, almost on par with food.

 

Regardless of genre, the greatest compliment one can pay to a writer is the turning of a page — followed, of course, by the turning of another and another.


Via Ruth Long
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Why Should We Write What We Know? - Anne Ashby - New Zealand Romance Writer

Why Should We Write What We Know? - Anne Ashby - New Zealand Romance Writer | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Why should we write what we know? Because readers have a right to expect authenticity in our work

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Lynda Dickson's curator insight, January 24, 2013 12:08 AM

Why should we write what we know? Simply because it is so easy to get caught out if we are relying on research to cover us. Writers of contemporary fiction can need a huge amount of research if you aren’t writing what you know.

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Bad Writing Advice From Famous Authors - Flavorwire

Bad Writing Advice From Famous Authors - Flavorwire | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Flavorwire
Bad Writing Advice From Famous Authors
Flavorwire
Aspiring writers will never tire of reading lists of writing advice from famous authors, whether legendary or living. And why should they?

Via Perry A Wilson, Lynda Dickson
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Perry A Wilson's curator insight, January 19, 2013 8:57 PM

Everyone gets bad advice. Here's some that writers get.

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“The Trouble with Quotes on the Internet…”

“The Trouble with Quotes on the Internet…” | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
A couple of months ago, my friend James Scott Bell posted a fascinating entry at The Kill Zone blog site. Jim is the author of thrillers like Try Dying and One More Lie. He’s also a great wri...

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30 Indispensable Writing Tips From Famous Authors

30 Indispensable Writing Tips From Famous Authors | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Writing is easy: All you have to do is start writing, finish writing, and make sure it's good. But here's some vastly more useful wisdom and advice from people who seriously know what the h...
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'Type So Hard You Bruise the Screen'

'Type So Hard You Bruise the Screen' | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

In the late 1950s, Jack Kerouac typed out a list of thirty points describing his writing practice in a piece titled “Belief and Technique for Modern Prose: List of Essentials.” Following in this tradition, I humbly offer my own thirty points for prose. I have gathered these thoughts from mentors, fellow writers, and my own disjointed thinking. Many of these ideas have been better worded by wiser writers than me, but I’ve avoided quoting.


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Revealing Your Novel's Theme

Revealing Your Novel's Theme | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

You may have started out with a character you cherished and hoped to share with the world, or a scene that haunted you, following your every movement until you'd explored it and found it's resolution, but by now that original idea has developed into a full-fledged novel with character arcs and plot turns and hero's journeys.


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16 Observations About Real Dialogue

16 Observations About Real Dialogue | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

 

Dialogue can make your story. In fact, as Shakespeare knew, you can tell a whole story just through dialogue. Good sto­ries are about real peo­ple, and real peo­ple love to talk to each other. We are bio­log­i­cally dis­posed to receive plea­sure from conversation.


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7 Steps to Writing a Story in Scenes

7 Steps to Writing a Story in Scenes | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

You’ll notice I didn’t include the word “easy” in the title of this post. There are not seven “easy” steps to writing a story in scenes. It takes hard work. I suspect that's why so many writers substitute narrative summary for scenes.

 

 


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Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

1) Write

 

2) Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.

.


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The Myth of Backstory

The Myth of Backstory | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

An argument for why "backstory" is more of a state of mind than a deliberate writing tool.


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3 Reasons Why Some Books Never Sell - Rob Eagar

3 Reasons Why Some Books Never Sell - Rob Eagar | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

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Structuring Your Story's Scenes, Pt. 7: The Three Building Blocks of the Sequel

Structuring Your Story's Scenes, Pt. 7: The Three Building Blocks of the Sequel | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

Sequels may well contain conflict in some form, but they’re more likely to offer tension (i.e., the threat of conflict). This is an important distinction. Outright conflict on every single page can create a relentless pace that ends up exhausting readers and leaves no time for important character development. Even the highest of high-speed stories must take a break from the conflict and slow down, even if microscopically, for the sequel.

 


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How to Write Like a Songwriter: 4 Easy Ways

How to Write Like a Songwriter: 4 Easy Ways | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Rhythm in music and writing is an essential element to a successful song or blog. Here are four great ways on how to write like a songwriter.

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50 Business Storytelling Mantras to Live By (2013)

50 Business Storytelling Mantras to Live By (2013) | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
For the past two years (2011 and 2012), I shared my top 50 business storytelling and communications mantras. As I plan for 2013, I always look to my l...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 18, 2013 10:33 AM

Love these for some Friday inspiration! Keep these handy to keep you on your best storytelling toes. 


Thanks Ira Koretsky for putting this list together and keeping us all on track!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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5 Tips to Create a Page-Turning Plot

5 Tips to Create a Page-Turning Plot | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

A couple of months ago, a fellow writer whom I’d met on Facebook sent me a message about my second novel that began: “I just read the prologue to Cadaver Blues. Wow. Straight into the story and already hooked.”

 

Both of these interactions — and others like them — have left me smiling over the past eighteen months. They’re gold for an author. More important than money, almost on par with food.

 

Regardless of genre, the greatest compliment one can pay to a writer is the turning of a page — followed, of course, by the turning of another and another.


Via Ruth Long
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12 Story Cliches You’ll Be Glad You Didn’t Use- JourneyCraft.tv

12 Story Cliches You’ll Be Glad You Didn’t Use- JourneyCraft.tv | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

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22 Rules to Phenomenal Storytelling: What Emma Coats Learned and Tweeted [Infographic]

22 Rules to Phenomenal Storytelling: What Emma Coats Learned and Tweeted [Infographic] | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Former Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats tweeted these rules: a mix of things learned from directors and coworkers at Pixar, listening to writers and directors talk about their craft, and via tria...

 

Love this inforgraphic to keep handy! I'll probably use it in workshops, too.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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True or False? Pay Attention to Structure to Tell if a Story is Made Up

True or False? Pay Attention to Structure to Tell if a Story is Made Up | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

"Psychologists and psychotherapists have long relied on the power of narrative storytelling to help their patients make sense of their world. In fact, it's been said that we are our narratives. For evidence that this may be true, pay attention to how people shape their stories about themselves. As it turns out, there is a big difference between the way we narrate events that have really happened to us and those we've invented."

 

Image by prosotphoto (Shutterstock)

 

Love this article! We now have a storytelling lie detector kit. As storytelling rises in popularity in a whole host of business applications, keeping our antenna sharp for fabrications is going to be important.

 

Remember these 'tells' and let's keep on focusing on authenticity.

 

Thanks Gregg Morris @greggvm for finding and sharing this article!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How Publishing A Book Is Like Giving Birth To A Baby - Forbes

How Publishing A Book Is Like Giving Birth To A Baby - Forbes | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it
Writer and "Real Housewives of New York" newcomer Carole Radziwill compares completing a book to giving birth. But is writing a novel really like having a baby?
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Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing

Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

In the winter of 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules of writing published in The New York Times nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian reached out to some of today’s most celebrated authors and asked them to each offer his or her rules. My favorite is Zadie Smith’s list — an exquisite balance of the practical, the philosophical, and the poetic:

 


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The Writer’s Toolbox: Literary devices that will enhance your writing

The Writer’s Toolbox: Literary devices that will enhance your writing | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

Sometimes, authors approach me with perfectly “fine” writing. Grammatically, it’s all good. Words are correctly spelled, and there’s nothing overtly wrong with the writer’s voice except that it lacks a certain vigor and vim. Usually, that is because the writer has failed to employ all of the tools available to make their writing sparkle, leaving their writing bland and perfunctory. Below are some useful literary devices that can add another layer to your work and create subtext, foreshadowing, allusion, and depth.


Via Ruth Long
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16 Observations About Real Dialogue

16 Observations About Real Dialogue | Sarah's Scoops on Writing | Scoop.it

 

Dialogue can make your story. In fact, as Shakespeare knew, you can tell a whole story just through dialogue. Good sto­ries are about real peo­ple, and real peo­ple love to talk to each other. We are bio­log­i­cally dis­posed to receive plea­sure from conversation.


Via Ruth Long
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