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Polio : Médecins Sans Frontières dénonce l'éradication à tout prix - Le Nouvel Observateur

Polio : Médecins Sans Frontières dénonce l'éradication à tout prix - Le Nouvel Observateur | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Le Nouvel Observateur Polio : Médecins Sans Frontières dénonce l'éradication à tout prix Le Nouvel Observateur L'insistance des autorités à vacciner, parfois même sous la contrainte, est très mal comprise et ces vaccins fournis gratuitement font...
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Leo Pharma sets out its social media principles

Leo Pharma sets out its social media principles | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

Also expands its use of Twitter with two new accounts


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Hospital Ratings on Social Media May Reflect True Quality of Care

Hospital Ratings on Social Media May Reflect True Quality of Care | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

A new study has found a correlation between how hospitals are rated on Facebook’s five-star system and how well they performed on a widely-used measure of quality care.

Late in 2013, Facebook began providing organizations the option of allowing users to post ratings ranging from one to five stars on their official Facebook pages. The current study was designed to compare hospitals’ 30-day readmission rates with their Facebook ratings.

“We found that the hospitals in which patients were less likely to have unplanned readmissions within the 30 days after discharge had higher Facebook ratings than were those with higher readmission rates,” says lead author McKinley Glover, M.D., MHS, a clinical fellow in the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Department of Radiology.

“Since user-generated social media feedback appears to be reflective of patient outcomes, hospitals and healthcare leaders should not underestimate social media’s value in developing quality improvement programs.”

As the use of social media has grown, consumers’ health care decisions may be influenced by information posted to social media sites by patients and others, the authors note. Several hospitals and healthcare organizations use social media for a variety of reasons, but there has been little investigation into whether hospitals ratings on social media accurately reflect patient satisfaction or the quality of care received.

 

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from Hospital Compare — a website sponsored by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services — on 30-day readmission rates for 4,800 U.S. hospitals. While more than 80 percent had rates within the expected national average range, seven percent had significantly lower-than-average readmission rates — a measure that reflects above-average care — and eight percent had rates that were significantly higher than average.

 

Low-readmission hospitals were more likely to have Facebook pages than were high-readmission hospitals — 93 percent versus 82 percent — and more than 80 percent of those in both groups with Facebook pages provided the five-star rating system. The findings showed that each one-star increase in a hospital’s Facebook rating was tied to a greater than five-fold increase in the likelihood that it would have a low, rather than a high readmission rate.

Other data available on hospital Facebook pages — such as the number of times users reported visiting the hospital, how long a hospital’s Facebook page had been available, and the number of Facebook ‘likes’ — did not make a difference in readmission rates.

 

“While we can’t say conclusively that social media ratings are fully representative of the actual quality of care, this research adds support to the idea that social media has quantitative value in assessing the areas of patient satisfaction — something we are hoping to study next — and other quality outcomes,” says Glover.

“Hospitals should be aware that social media ratings may influence patient perceptions of hospitals and potentially their healthcare choices. Hospitals and other healthcare organizations should also be aware of the potential message they send by not using social media.

“Members of the general public should be encouraged to provide accurate feedback on their healthcare experiences via social media, but should not rely solely on such ratings to make their health care decisions.”

 


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Apple and Google stake a claim on big pharma’s turf - FT.com

Apple and Google stake a claim on big pharma’s turf - FT.com | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Within 24 hours of Apple launching its platform for health research this month, tens of thousands of iPhone users had signed up to take part in five inaugural studies involving some of the US’s most respected medical institutions. A Harvard-affiliate

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Dr. Aurélie Juhem - Elle a trouvé la molécule tueuse de cancer

Dr. Aurélie Juhem - Elle a trouvé la molécule tueuse de cancer | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
On l’appelle « ET-D5 » et elle pourrait bien révolutionner le milieu médical. Découverte par le Dr Aurélie Juhem, cette molécule est capable d’arrêter la prolifération d’une tumeur puis de détruire spécifiquement les vaisseaux formés pour l’alimenter. Testée avec succès sur des souris, cette molécule « miracle » sera expérimentée en 2016 sur des humains.
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Quantified Self : Marché des Capteurs d'Activité de Sport et de Santé

Depuis 2007, le Quantified Self désigne une pratique d’auto-mesure qui consiste à recueillir un maximum de données sur sa santé et son activité physique au cou…


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Romain DEFOY's curator insight, March 25, 6:00 AM

Les résultats en demie-teinte du marché globale des biens techniques illustrent les évolutions profondes que connait l’électronique dans le monde, et la France n’est pas épargnée. L’ère des smartphones et des tablettes laisse désormais place à celle des objets connectés wearables, dont les ventes devraient exploser d’ici à 2020. Les objets connectés de quantified self se placent en tête de ces usages.

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Inside Apple's Top Secret Apple Watch Fitness Lab

Inside Apple's Top Secret Apple Watch Fitness Lab | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

Apple, known for keeping its product developments under the strictest of lock-and-key, gave ABC News exclusive access into its top secret health and fitness lab, where only Apple employees became test subjects for the new Apple Watch.

 

Apple engineers, managers and developers have been secretly volunteering for the past year in this state-of-the-art lab to participate in rowing, running, yoga and many more fitness activities in order to collect data for the Apple Watch’s inner workings.

 

“[The employees] knew they were testing something, but they didn't know it was for the Apple Watch,” said Jeff Williams, Apple’s senior vice president of operations. “We hooked them up with all the masks and so forth, but we would put on an Apple Watch covered up.”


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UCanRow2's curator insight, March 25, 12:32 PM

So cool to see them using rowing as one of the exercises to test this new product!

Denise Silber's curator insight, March 25, 7:49 PM

All is top secret at Apple

 
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The gamification of health may be booming, but is it effective?

The gamification of health may be booming, but is it effective? | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

The health care industry's use of gaming to encourage consumers to adopt healthier habits is growing rapidly, but evidence that such strategies can produce lasting positive health outcomes is lacking.


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Play to Cure: Games for cancer

Play to Cure: Games for cancer | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

If you have ever wanted to help cure cancer, you might now be able to do so - with a spot of space-travel from the comfort of your own home.

Scientists at Cancer Research UK have developed an intergalactic smartphone game to help them analyse the overwhelming reams of genetic data generated in recent studies.

They hope thousands of people will play the game, simultaneously trawling through genetic material to pinpoint more precisely which genes cause the disease.


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Stephen Greengrass's curator insight, February 5, 2014 8:52 AM

The results of that Cancer Research Game Jam...

Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek's curator insight, March 16, 2014 6:38 AM

Pharmageek partenaire de Interaction Healthcare à l'occasion de la conférence :

"Du serious game au Google glass, comment la simulation numérique peut changer la pratique du médecin et la vie du patient ?"

qui aura lieu

le 3 avril prochain à PARIS


INSCRIVEZ VOUS

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Kinect powers Alzheimer's and dementia care project

Kinect powers Alzheimer's and dementia care project | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Sure, virtual reality and browser-based games are impressive, but Unreal Engine 4's latest use is a bit more noble: improving the lives of Alzheimer's

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Patients want pharma to reach them through digital channels

Patients want pharma to reach them through digital channels | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.

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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, March 23, 1:31 PM

#Digital and #patients: 64% patients ready to provide #health #data in exchange for free information and services

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Des cannes connectées pour guider les malvoyants dans les villes | Proxima Mobile : applications et services gratuits sur mobile pour les citoyens

Des cannes connectées pour guider les malvoyants dans les villes | Proxima Mobile : applications et services gratuits sur mobile pour les citoyens | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Portail des applications et de services aux citoyens sur téléphone mobile, coordonné par la Délégation aux usages de l'Internet (Ministère de la Recherche / Ministère de l'Industrie) .

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Adoption of Social Media by Healthcare Professionals: Optional or Necessary?

Adoption of Social Media by Healthcare Professionals: Optional or Necessary? | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

“Whether doctors choose to engage in social media or not, they cannot ignore its implications.” These were the emphatic words said by Pat Rich (@cmaer)

“Whether doctors choose to engage in social media or not, they cannot ignore its implications.” These were the emphatic words said by Pat Rich (@cmaer) during theHealthcare and Social Media Summit held last February 21, 2015.

Social media has changed the way we communicate and share information.  Healthcare is a field fueled by accurate and reliable information.  Social media is a good venue for patient education, patient support, health research, medical education and even fundraising for healthcare professionals (HCPs). It is likewise a good venue to obtain information, receive support and even track treatment progress for patients. It is inevitable that the synergy of healthcare and social media is happening.

As of January 2015, there are 40 million Filipinos who have active social media accounts each spending an average of 4 hours daily. That’s possibly 9.6 billion minutes spent on social media per day.  If it takes less than a minute to like or share content, imagine how much information can be exchanged!  It is mind-boggling!

 

 

HCPs are life-long learners who have the responsibility to update themselves on the latest practice guidelines in order to give the best patient care.  Should this responsibility extend to learning how to communicate better and more efficiently with our community beyond our clinics and hospitals?

Let’s talk about why HCPs should engage in social media. Let’s explore the issues and challenges surrounding this and how we can address them. These are the topics we can discuss:

T1: Do healthcare professionals have the responsibility to engage in social media to communicate with their patients/community? Why or why not?

T2: What are the challenges of healthcare professionals in adopting social media in their practice? Why the hesitation?

T3: How do we address these issues/concerns? Should the initiative come from healthcare organizations or individual HCPs?

Let’s chat away on March 14, 2015, 9PM Manila time (8am EST).  Do not forget to use the hashtag #HealthXPH. We are looking forward to all your tweets!

Reference:
Global Web Index Q4 2014 and We Are Social SG

 


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Nicole Gillen's curator insight, March 18, 8:55 AM

Necessary!!

WebGems SNMinc's comment, March 19, 12:24 AM
That's an excellent insight.
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Enquête sur les Français, la santé et les objets connectés

Enquête sur les Français, la santé et les objets connectés | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

Le site 1001Pharmacies.com a réalisé une enquête du 1er janvier au 15 mars 2015 sur la relation des Français aux objets connectés, et plus particulièrement à la e-santé.

 

99% des personnes interrogées par 1001Pharmacies.com répondent être intéressées par les objets connectés. Ce chiffre est révélateur de l’appétence des français pour ce nouveaux produits.

« De plus en plus d’objets sont connectés à notre corps. Ces produits s’immiscent dans notre quotidien, avec pour objectif principal d’améliorer notre santé : pour garder la forme, pour améliorer ses performances, pour prévenir des maladies, pour diagnostiquer l’arrivée précoce de pathologies, etc. Pour l’instant, ces objets sont encore très peu utilisés, notamment à cause de leurs prix prohibitifs. Cependant, énormément de développements sont réalisés, et l’engouement qu’ils suscitent pousse à croire qu’ils deviendront rapidement indispensables aux utilisateurs. Mais que pensent vraiment les consommateurs de ces innovations technologiques ?» explique Cédric O’Neill, Pharmacien et co-fondateur de 1001Pharmacies.com.


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France Silver Eco's curator insight, March 18, 3:27 AM

Le marché de la e-santé est en plein essor en France, 1001Pharmacies.com a souhaité savoir comment les Français perçoivent et accueillent les produits de e-santé.

Suzana Biseul PRo's curator insight, March 18, 9:20 AM

« Cet engouement est sans compter les grandes marques du numérique qui s’emparent d’une partie de ce marché avec le lancement de montres connectées. Le secteur de la santé connecté connaît un réel succès et ce n’est pas une coïncidence si les géants de l’informatique développent chacun leur gamme de produits. », conclut l’enquête.

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Is Social Media Worth the Risk for Pharma?

Is Social Media Worth the Risk for Pharma? | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

It’s a question that comes up all the time in my discussions with senior industry executives – is social media actually worth the risk for a sector as heavily regulated as the pharmaceutical industry?

And while some may roll their eyes and denounce pharma as being backward for asking such a question, I don’t agree – it’s a great question and an extremely valid one. Every business decision has to consider risk versus benefit.

But here’s the problem with measuring that risk-benefit ratio: you need to consider the timeframe. It’s true for every decision ever made, no matter how big or small and it also applies to our personal lives. For example, there is a small but finite risk involved every time you travel in a car, train, boat or plane. If I considered that risk, versus the benefit of travelling to business meetings, over just a 24h timeframe I’d probably never bother (and also be perceived as being a little odd!). But at least some of those meetings will turn into mutually beneficial commercial relationships, so the benefit far outweighs the risk for me when you look at it over the longer-term. In fact, there is a longer-term risk, to my livelihood, from not travelling that is more worrying than the immediate one.

So if you’re just looking at the short-term risk-benefit ratio of anything you’re getting a distorted picture. This is exactly how I challenge people in pharma to look at it when they ask me about risk.

The benefits of social media engagement by pharmaceutical companies are very clear to me and, at a simple level, they are twofold.

Firstly, the relationships formed via social media engagement translate to the offline world. I know this because I’ve seen it happen many times with my business. Many of the healthcare influencers (patients / patient organisation leaders, industry executives, influential healthcare providers, media etc.) who I know on first-name terms initially met me via social media. When access to these people is often a major barrier for pharmaceutical companies the value of social media cannot be ignored.

Secondly, the kind of direct feedback you can receive via social media is fantastically useful – both directly online and, in line with the way it builds ‘real-world’ relationships outlined above, from subsequent offline conversations. In the information age, this kind of input that can only be obtained by being well-connected, can deliver a critical advantage. Social media listening is a start, but engaging delivers a whole new level of intelligence.

So that’s it – access to key customers and unique insights are the two main benefits for pharma using social media, in my view. Both have a major impact on the bottom line success of products.

And the immediate risks of engaging online? Most of them carry even bigger risks from not engaging in the longer-term.

For example, companies worry about picking up adverse events about their products, necessitating subsequent action. Yes – this might well happen, but what if people are having adverse events when using your products and you’re not picking them up? Where does that lead?

Or the notion that by taking part in social media activity, your critics might start to attack you. If you have such vocal critics the reality is they are already attacking you online and, unless you listen, you can’t take the necessary action to remedy it. So by not engaging, the reputational risk to your business – and associated commercial risk – is massive.

I could go on and on, but hopefully you get my point.

Online social engagement is here to stay. It’s only going to get more and more important as a conduit for connectivity and information sharing. So next time someone in pharma asks you if social media is worth the risk, ask them to cast their gaze a bit further down the line to a point when all their competitors are engaging online.

Is not engaging on social media then worth the risk?



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Up To 90 Percent Of Adverse Reactions Unreported, Pharma Companies Search Social Media To Make Drugs Safer

Up To 90 Percent Of Adverse Reactions Unreported, Pharma Companies Search Social Media To Make Drugs Safer | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

Some reports show that up to nine out of 10 adverse reactions from drugs go unreported. In an effort to find those possible adverse drug reactions in medications, pharmaceutical companies are reportedly searching social media for a better chance at learning of potential adverse drug reactions. There are many potential adverse drug reactions that patients might not think of to report to their health care provider, according to The Pharmaceutical Journal.

“Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are grossly under reported by everyone, including healthcare professionals, but particularly so by patients,” David Lewis, head of global safety at the Switzerland-based pharmaceutical company Novartis. Novartis is working on a three-year project called Web-RADR (Recognizing Adverse Drug Reactions) that will in part use social media information to determine if there are aftermarket adverse drug reactions in various medications. The program even uses the hashtag #pharmacovigilance.

Everyday, people take to social media and talk about their medication or their children’s medication. These scientists believe these posts have the potential to quickly warn pharmaceutical companies of potential drug reactions.

“Mining data from social media gives us a greater chance of capturing ADRs that a patient wouldn’t necessarily complain about to their doctor or nurse. Physicians are great at diagnosing illnesses and noting objective signs, but patients are great at reporting subjective reactions and feelings,” Lewis explained.”For example, a psychiatrist can’t see suicidal ideation as an ADR while a patient can describe it perfectly.”

Long before social media took on the form we see today, an American with HIV began taking antiretroviral medications, according to The Pharmaceutical Journal. On a patient web forum discussion board for the drug, back in 1997, the man wrote, “My belly button went from an inny to an outy.”

Before long, other patients reported the same adverse reaction to the antiretroviral drug on the discussion board. The adverse reaction was initially only reported through this old school form of social media. It became known as lipodystrophy syndrome. No one had even known it was a possible reaction that could come from the drug, because the drug’s safety trial only ran for 48 weeks, and this syndrome didn’t develop until after that 48 week cut-off point used by the drug company’s safety assessors. Therein lies the value of social media monitoring for adverse drug reactions, the pharmacovigilance supporters say.

Still, the idea of monitoring social media doesn’t sit well with some people, while others wonder whether a patient experiencing an adverse drug reaction who posts about it on social media should be contacted and informed of what they might be experiencing. “Would that be helpful or creepy,” the scientists wonder.

What do you think? How would you feel if someone contacted you and told you that, while searching social media for evidence of adverse drug reactions, they stumbled on your social media post?


Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1914900/up-to-90-percent-of-adverse-reactions-unreported-pharma-companies-search-social-media-to-make-drugs-safer/#7ccsVrbMoG5mA73g.99

 


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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, March 23, 1:01 PM

Not so suprising, when did you report Adverse Reaction for the last time ? Part of the answer of tomorrow's Pharmacovigilance is in Social Media.

Remember: Twitter is already faster and accurate predction of epidemic flu compared to official observatory. 

Nicole Gillen's curator insight, March 24, 8:09 AM

totally agree.  And I wrote on the same recently: http://blogs.csc.com/2015/03/09/pharmacovigilance-taps-social-media/

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Could any legacy EHR vendor compete with a product incorporating IBM Watson?

Could any legacy EHR vendor compete with a product incorporating IBM Watson? | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
IBM announced a strategic investment in specialty practice EMR provider, Modernizing Medicine to accelerate the adoption of Watson cognitive computing in healthcare.

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Denise Silber's curator insight, March 25, 7:51 PM

Also noted this investment pointed out by Andrew Spong...The path is great. We'll see how it goes from a practical standpoint.

 
ChemaCepeda's curator insight, March 26, 1:32 PM

La computación cognitiva y el procesamiento del lenguaje natural de Watson al servicio de la salud. De seguirse cumpliendo la ley de Moore, es posible que en pocos años tengamos esa capacidad de computación en nuestros teléfonos y podremos preguntar en tiempo real sobre tratamientos y cuidados

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E-santé: le milieu médical bousculé par la technologie - Les Échos

E-santé: le milieu médical bousculé par la technologie - Les Échos | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it

Brisons net le suspense ! Pour le moment, le bon vieux médecin de famille n’est pas menacé. Une bonne raison : l’organisation de la...


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Les patients donnent les raisons de leur non-observance

Les patients donnent les raisons de leur non-observance | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Une enquête a été menée auprès de plus de 1 300 personnes atteintes de maladies chroniques afin de mieux cerner pourquoi elles ne prennent

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Eric Salat's curator insight, March 18, 8:15 PM

Le sujet de santé publique qui interpelle 

Michel Mazuez's curator insight, March 22, 12:56 PM

Le lien ne  s'ouvre pas forcément . Mais on en revient toujours à l'éternelle question : soigne-t-on  des statistiques ou des personnes libres de leurs choix , y compris de "tester" leur ordonnance ( souvent trop "copieuse" ) . Il serait plus efficace de voir le problème dans l'autre sens : "Et quand vous ne prenez pas tout vos médicaments , il se passe quoi ? Etudions ça  ensemble ...  " . ( environ 50% des ordos sont scrupuleusement "respectées" ... ça rend modeste ! ) .

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Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
A l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de la tuberculose, le Janssen Health Policy Centre a dévoilé mardi un tableau de bord numérique permettant de parcourir et de comparer les données sanitaires de 15 maladies parmi les plus répandues dans les 28 États membres de l'Union Européenne (UE), un outil d'analyse unique en son genre.

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NutriDial : application mobile pour les patients sous dialyse

NutriDial : application mobile pour les patients sous dialyse | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
A l’occasion de la Journée Mondiale du Rein,  le laboratoire Sanofi a lancé une application mobile pour les patients sous dialyse : NutriDial. Découverte. Aujourd'hui, l’insuffisance rénale chroniq...

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Romain DEFOY's curator insight, March 23, 5:31 AM

Cette application permet d’évaluer la teneur en phosphore, potassium et sodium des aliments consommés, d’obtenir un suivi personnalisé des objectifs de consommation quotidienne de protéines, de suivre tout au long de la journée ces paramètres,d’utiliser la rubrique « Favoris » pour les aliments consommés régulièrement et de disposer d’informations utiles à la gestion du quotidien dans la rubrique « Astuces et + ».

Elle s’adresse également aux professionnels de santé en permettant d’échanger avec les patients dialysés de façon interactive autour de la nutrition, et d’améliorer ainsi leur suivi diététique.

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Nintendo explains why it wants to improve your quality of life

Nintendo explains why it wants to improve your quality of life | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
President Satoru Iwata outlines his plan for new health-focused business unit at Mario maker.

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Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? - Forbes

Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? - Forbes | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Video games can sometimes be associated with a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy weight gain.  A new study led by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) suggests that certain games could...

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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, March 24, 10:36 AM

Video games just as good as any other Physical Education activity.

Justin Tu's curator insight, March 25, 11:36 PM

Daniel. T,  2013, 'Could Video Games be Used to Improve Youth Health?', Article of Forbes. 

Daniel explains in this article that E-games could provide more exercise than physical education for kids in middle school. The author provides that the studies from George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services demonstrate the ability in using video games to provide an attractive energy-burning P.E.. Their research focuses on 'Exer-games', where middle school students get on the video game 'Dance Dance Revolution' and has proven to burn more calories over traditional P.E. activities. The article is useful, it provides details on how video games benefit people's fitness, however the main limitation is that Daniel's article does not provide studies or information on how this affects adult fitness through video games. It'll be further researched to discover whether video games can be a useful alternative way of exercise. 

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Direct Hôpital - Accessibilité: une solution pour guider les malvoyants grâce à leur smartphone

Direct Hôpital - Accessibilité: une solution pour guider les malvoyants grâce à leur smartphone | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
DirectHopital.com est le site dédié aux managers hospitaliers. Il traite d’actualités pratiques, de retour sur expérience et des nouvelles initiatives dans les domaines des RH, de la qualité / sécurité, des finances, des achats et de la logistique.

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ResearchKit : Apple impose la transparence aux chercheurs

ResearchKit : Apple impose la transparence aux chercheurs | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
Avec ResearchKit, Apple donne aux chercheurs la possibilité d'intégrer des millions de cobayes à leurs recherches médicales, en conservant un protocole fiable. Mais les

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Tanja Juslin's curator insight, March 23, 3:15 AM

New and easy way of collecting survey data for research.

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Google wins patent for wristband that could treat CANCER

Google wins patent for wristband that could treat CANCER | Santé Industrie Pharmaceutique | Scoop.it
The California firm's patent details a wearable that could target any substances, when present in the blood, that may affect the health of a wearer by transmitting energy into the vessels.

Via Marc Phippen
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Craig Allen Keefner's curator insight, March 20, 11:17 AM
  • Patent details a wearable that could target substances in a wearer's blood
  • This substances could be proteins linked with Parkinson's, or cancer cells
  • It would then 'modify or destroy' targets by transmitting energy into blood
  • This could include infrared signals, a radio-frequency or acoustic pulse
  • Scientists in the life sciences division of Google X laboratories are using human skin in their research to develop the wristband
  • Wristband could also work with pills that cause unhealthy cells to light up 
Courtney Bonner's curator insight, March 25, 12:56 PM

If this wristband ends up being approved by the FDA, it could be a major change for the medical field. Cancer is obviously devastating and ruins too many lives worldwide, so it would be awesome to see this wristband save the world.