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Persistent concern about poverty in developing nations tempers optimism for the future

Persistent concern about poverty in developing nations tempers optimism for the future | Sample ScoopIt account | Scoop.it

A report by Oxford University last week predicted that poverty in many of the fastest-developing countries could be wiped out within the next two decades if current trends continue. This report followed a similar assessment from the UN, which concluded that poverty eradication programmes had had far greater impact than expected, and that hundreds of millions of people were in the process of being lifted into the global middle class.

Citizens of developing world nations broadly share this upbeat assessment, and believe that the coming years will bring significant social improvements. Large majorities in China (78%), Brazil (77%), Nigeria and Kenya (both 65%) agree that society will become healthier and more equitable over the next twenty years.


Via W. Robert de Jongh
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Mergers and Collaborations for Charity Navigator? (SSIR)

Mergers and Collaborations for Charity Navigator? (SSIR) | Sample ScoopIt account | Scoop.it
Why don’t organizations consider merging or at least collaborating more?
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Persistent concern about poverty in developing nations tempers optimism for the future

Persistent concern about poverty in developing nations tempers optimism for the future | Sample ScoopIt account | Scoop.it

A report by Oxford University last week predicted that poverty in many of the fastest-developing countries could be wiped out within the next two decades if current trends continue. This report followed a similar assessment from the UN, which concluded that poverty eradication programmes had had far greater impact than expected, and that hundreds of millions of people were in the process of being lifted into the global middle class.

Citizens of developing world nations broadly share this upbeat assessment, and believe that the coming years will bring significant social improvements. Large majorities in China (78%), Brazil (77%), Nigeria and Kenya (both 65%) agree that society will become healthier and more equitable over the next twenty years.


Via W. Robert de Jongh
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Embracing Emergence: How Collective Impact Addresses Complexity - FSG

Embracing Emergence: How Collective Impact Addresses Complexity - FSG | Sample ScoopIt account | Scoop.it
Complex social problems cannot be solved by a single organization or by a simple recipe.
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Lessons from Brazil to get rid of poverty - The Economic Times

Lessons from Brazil to get rid of poverty - The Economic Times | Sample ScoopIt account | Scoop.it

Extreme poverty afflicts more than one in five people, according to the World Bank. The institution's new president, Jim Yong Kim, speaks of the need to "bend the arc of history in order to eliminate extreme poverty and achieve shared prosperity". 

At a time when his bank's resources as well as the budgetary resources of governments are limited, Braziloffers important lessons on how to eliminate extreme poverty and reduce inequality. Perhaps the biggest lesson is that real progress can be achieved in a cost-effective manner if the programmes are targeted well. 

An Unlikely Success Story Brazil, my home country, is an unlikely success story. It has long been known for having one of the most unequal levels of income distribution. This changed when Lula was elected as president in 2002. He ran on the platform of boosting social and economic inclusion and fighting poverty and inequality - and to achieve that goal within a single generation.


Via W. Robert de Jongh
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