Salus (Health)
Follow
Find
108 views | +0 today
Salus (Health)
P4 (predictive, preventive, personalized, partecipatory) medicine
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Vibration may help heal chronic wounds

Vibration may help heal chronic wounds | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Wounds may heal more quickly if exposed to low-intensity vibration, report researchers. The finding, in mice, may hold promise for the 18 million Americans who have type 2 diabetes, and especially the quarter of them who will eventually suffer from foot ulcers. Their wounds tend to heal slowly and can become chronic or worsen rapidly.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Bach2 maintains T cells in a naive state by suppressing effector memory-related genes

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Evaluating Online Sources of Health Information - National Cancer Institute

Evaluating Online Sources of Health Information - National Cancer Institute | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Information to help people evaluate the source and credibility of health information that they find online.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from immunology
Scoop.it!

Taking immune cells for a test drive | Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Taking immune cells for a test drive | Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Via Krishan Maggon , Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM
Pasquale Valente's insight:

 121 genetic variants linked to the induction of immune gene expression.

more...
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, April 2, 3:38 AM

This work is the first installment from the ImmVar group, explained Christophe Benoist. This analysis was coordinated with parallel studies within the ImmVar project on regulatory genetics in resting blood cells, and in activated T lymphocytes, such that the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system are represented. “It’s been a fun program for all the collaborators,” said Benoist, Broad associate member, professor at HMS, and leader of the ImmVar consortium. “The team has done a fantastic job in putting together this beautiful paper, but stay tuned for other important stories to come.”

Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | KurzweilAI

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Samples profiled in FANTOM5 (credit: Alistair R. R. Forrest et al./Nature) A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Constructing a large network of multiple infections to determine how multiple parasites interact within humans

Constructing a large network of multiple infections to determine how multiple parasites interact within humans | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Imagine going to the doctor with an infection and being sent home with a course of drugs. Unknown to your doctor you actually have two infections. If you take the drugs will the other infection go away by itself? What if you take the drugs and the other infection gets worse? This quandary faces those treating patients with multiple infections.

 

A new study led by former University of Sheffield PhD student Dr Emily Griffiths, in collaboration with the universities of Edinburgh, Liverpool and Zürich, has taken a novel approach to understanding this problem, shedding light on how multiple parasites interact within humans.

 

The study compiled a list of many of the parasites that infect humans, another list of the parts of the body consumed by each parasite, and also information about how the immune system responds to each parasite. This information was used to construct a large network of multiple infections in humans - a bit like a food web of infections inside the human body.

 

Building this network revealed some previously unknown patterns, something that could pave the way for new treatment strategies which help tackle multiple infections. For example, groups of parasites often share similar parts of their host, and these groups are prime candidates for coordinated treatment.

 

Dr Griffiths, who carried out the research during her PhD in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences at the University of Sheffield, said: "After studying the fascinating range of hundreds of different infections that can occur in the same person at the same time, we've shown that we could better treat patients if we know what parasites are eating inside our bodies.

 

"Our web has revealed the ways hundreds of parasites could live together, which means that we can develop new coordinated treatments that help fight more than one infection.

 

 more at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/273905.php ;


Via nrip
more...
Beverly Morgan's curator insight, March 18, 9:41 AM

More than one infection in your body can be the reason your not getting any relief from your meds....more research to come but this is a great start on how diagnosing the multiple infections can help identify coordinated treatments! 

Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

ATHENA "desktop human" for drug and toxic agent screening gets a liver

ATHENA "desktop human" for drug and toxic agent screening gets a liver | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

A five-year, US$19 million multi-institutional effort is working on developing a "desktop human" that could reduce the need for animal testing in the development of new drugs. The "homo minitus" is a drug and toxicity analysis system that would comprise four human organ constructs interconnected to mimic the response of human organs. The project has now reported success in the development of its first organ construct, a human liver construct that responds to exposure to a toxic chemical much like a real liver.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Pasquale Valente's insight:

the ultimate goal of the project is to, "build a lung that breathes, a heart that pumps, a liver that metabolizes and a kidney that excretes."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Innovation in healthcare, medicine and life sciences
Scoop.it!

Perform blood tests with your smartphone screen (Wired UK)

Perform blood tests with your smartphone screen (Wired UK) | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

A diagnostic tool that uses a smartphone screen to perform blood tests has been developed by a microengineering laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)


Via ehealthgr
more...
ehealthgr's curator insight, March 26, 6:12 AM
Check the company's website: http://qloudlab.com/
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Testing Complete DNA Sequences Yields Only Partial Info but Could Still Save Your Life

Testing Complete DNA Sequences Yields Only Partial Info but Could Still Save Your Life | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Evaluating your whole genome sequence to determine your health risks is not yet up to snuff. But as imperfect as it is, you still might see something that could save your life.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

FDA approves device to treat migraine headaches

FDA approves device to treat migraine headaches | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the marketing of an electronic medical device intended to treat migraine headaches .
Pasquale Valente's insight:

http://www.gizmag.com/celafy-electronic-headband-migraine/31299/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

A Small Part of the Brain, and Its Profound Effects - New York Times

A Small Part of the Brain, and Its Profound Effects - New York Times | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
The insula is a long-neglected brain region that has emerged as crucial to understanding what it feels like to be human.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from immunology
Scoop.it!

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in ...

Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in ... | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Lymph nodes, to be worthy of note, as one of the peripheral lymphoid organs of the immune system, are garrisons of B, T, and other immune cells but provide “home” for metastatic cancer cells. However, it is still a pending ...

Via Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM
more...
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Health & Life Extension
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Israeli Advances In Autism

Top 10 Israeli Advances In Autism | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
From research to social and educational programs, Israel excels in the struggle to understand autism and help families deal with this developmental disorder.
Via Tonya Scholz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from The future of medicine and health
Scoop.it!

World's first computational psychiatry centre opens in London

World's first computational psychiatry centre opens in London | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Centre will use latest technology to gain insights into human cognition and learn how it becomes disrupted in disorders

-

The worlds' first computational psychiatry centre has opened in London with a mission to shine a new light on human cognition and understand how it becomes disrupted in disorders such as depression and dementia.

Backed by a five-year €5m (£4.1m) investment from the Max Planck Society and UCL, the centre, which is named after its funders and will be based in London and Berlin, will use powerful modern technology in an effort to create more detailed models than ever before of how the human brain works.

Professor Ray Dolan, academic co-leader of the centre, said: "The brain is at some level an information processing machine and we have to understand what it's doing and how that information processor is working. We are trying to understand normal cognition with respect to the type of processes that go awry in psychiatric disorders and in ageing, we then intend to apply these models to understand ageing, depression or any other psychiatric disorders where we think the models may be appropriate. "


Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 ... [Eur J Cancer Prev. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 ... [Eur J Cancer Prev. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting

Pasquale Valente's insight:

"After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03)"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

MIT’s fast synthesis system could boost peptide-drug development | KurzweilAI

MIT’s fast synthesis system could boost peptide-drug development | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Small protein fragments, also called peptides, are promising as drugs because they can be designed for very specific functions inside living cells, but manufacturing the peptides takes several weeks, making it difficult to obtain large quantities, and to rapidly test their effectiveness.

 

A team of MIT chemists and chemical engineers has designed a way to manufacture peptides in mere hours. The new system, described in a recent issue of the journal ChemBioChem, could have a major impact on peptide drug development, says Bradley Pentelute, an assistant professor of chemistry and leader of the research team.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Hepatoprotective effect of silymarin

Hepatoprotective effect of silymarin | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

The use of medicinal plants in treating illnesses has been reported since ancestral times. In the case of hepatic diseases, several species such asSilybum marianum, Phyllanthus niruri, and Panus giganteus (Berk.) have been shown to ameliorate hepatic lesions. Silymarin is a natural compound derived from the species Silybum marianum, which is commonly known as Milk thistle. This plant contains at least seven flavoligands and the flavonoid taxifolin. The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of silymarin is caused by its ability to inhibit the free radicals that are produced from the metabolism of toxic substances such as ethanol, acetaminophen, and carbon tetrachloride. The generation of free radicals is known to damage cellular membranes and cause lipoperoxidation. Silymarin enhances hepatic glutathione and may contribute to the antioxidant defense of the liver. It has also been shown that silymarin increases protein synthesis in hepatocytes by stimulating RNA polymerase I activity. A previous study on humans reported that silymarin treatment caused a slight increase in the survival of patients with cirrhotic alcoholism compared with untreated controls.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Websalute, e-santé, e-health, #hcsmeuit
Scoop.it!

Tackling Cancer Through Big Data and the Cloud | Linux.com

Tackling Cancer Through Big Data and the Cloud | Linux.com | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Researchers at the National Cancer Institutes are building an open source public cloud to broaden access to cancer genomics data.


Via Giovanna Marsico
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Health - YouTube

When it comes to our bodies, data abounds. Unfortunately, the availability of data and the ability to use it to make effective decisions are not the same thi...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pasquale Valente from Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments
Scoop.it!

A Gene Family That Suppresses Prostate Cancer

A Gene Family That Suppresses Prostate Cancer | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Cornell University researchers report they have discovered direct genetic evidence that a family of genes, called MicroRNA-34 (miR-34), are bona fide tumor suppressors.

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
more...
Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 14, 9:00 AM

It is well accepted that mutations of the p53 gene have been implicated in half of all cancers. Research in mice has revealed how interplay between genes p53 and miR-34 (MicroRNA-34) jointly inhibits another cancer-causing gene called MET. In absence of p53 and miR-34, MET overexpresses a receptor protein and promotes unregulated cell growth and metastasis.

In mice that had both miR-34 and p53 silenced concurrently, cancerous lesions formed in a proximal part of the prostrate ducts, in a compartment known to contain prostate stem cells. The early lesions that developed when p53 was silenced alone occurred in a distal part of the ducts, away from the compartment where the stem cell pool is located. This suggested there was another mechanism involved when p53 and miR-34 were jointly silenced.

These findings suggest that drug therapies that target and suppress MET could be especially successful in cancers where both p53 and miR-34 are deficient. This is the first time this mechanism has been proven in a mouse model, said Alexander Nikitin, a professor of pathology in Cornell's Department of Biomedical Sciences. "These results indicated that together miR-34 and p53 regulate the prostate stem cell compartments," said Nikitin.

Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions ... [Cancers (Basel). 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin) and tumorigenic (Yang) properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pasquale Valente
Scoop.it!

Cancer Beaten by Nanoparticle-Based Drugs? [Video]

Cancer Beaten by Nanoparticle-Based Drugs? [Video] | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
There are many approaches to cancer treatment; some are controversial, while others give more of a homeopathic perspective. Current studies on cancer involve nanoparticle-based technologies that co...
Pasquale Valente's insight:
TRAIL-coated leukocytes that kill cancer cells in the circulation

http://www.pnas.org/content/111/3/930.full

more...
No comment yet.