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Vibration may help heal chronic wounds

Vibration may help heal chronic wounds | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Wounds may heal more quickly if exposed to low-intensity vibration, report researchers. The finding, in mice, may hold promise for the 18 million Americans who have type 2 diabetes, and especially the quarter of them who will eventually suffer from foot ulcers. Their wounds tend to heal slowly and can become chronic or worsen rapidly.
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Salus (Health)
P4 (predictive, preventive, personalized, partecipatory) medicine
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Salus

Salus | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Salus, by pasquale valente: P4 (predictive, preventive, personalized, partecipatory) medicine
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Bert Vogelstein’s Liquid Biopsy Blood Test for DNA Could Stop Cancer | MIT Technology Review

Bert Vogelstein’s Liquid Biopsy Blood Test for DNA Could Stop Cancer | MIT Technology Review | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
He watched his brother die from a cancer no drug could cure. Now one of the world’s most renowned cancer researchers says it’s time for Plan B.
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‘Normal’ bacteria vital for keeping intestinal lining intact, preventing disorders | KurzweilAI

‘Normal’ bacteria vital for keeping intestinal lining intact, preventing disorders | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
These images show intestines of wild-type and knockout mice injected with dextran (red) and imaged using two-photon microscopy. DAPI (blue) shows stained cells
Pasquale Valente's insight:

Bacteria that aid in digestion keep the intestinal lining intact, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and associates have found.

The findings, reported online in the journal Immunity, could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a wide range of other disorders.

The research involved the intestinal microbiome, which contains some 100 trillion bacteria. The role of these microorganisms in promoting or preventing disease is a major emerging field of study.

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Should We Be Thinking Differently About Cancer?

Should We Be Thinking Differently About Cancer? | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

After analyzing more than 3,500 tumors using different platforms, scientists propose cancers should be classified by molecular and genetic type instead of tissue of origin.


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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 8, 11:12 AM

Cancer is typically classified according to where the cancerous tissues originated. However new research from the University of California, San Francisco, is proposing cancer should instead be classified according to its genetic and molecular features.

Study author Chris Benz, a professor at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, CA, points out that this study will improve design of clinical trials by helping to identify patients more likely to respond to new treatments based on the genomic reclassification of their tumors.

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Biomotor discovered in many bacteria and viruses

Biomotor discovered in many bacteria and viruses | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Nano-biotechnologists have reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. These revolution biomotors are widespread among many bacteria and viruses.
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‘Rewired’ mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses | KurzweilAI

‘Rewired’ mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Mice lacking a specific protein (TRAP-1) live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses, such as tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation, when compared with normal mice, researchers at The Wistar Institute have discovered.In healthy cells, TRAP-1 is an important regulator of metabolism and has been shown to regulate energy production in mitochondria, which are organelles that generate chemically useful energy for the cell.


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'Biological pacemaker' tested in lab

'Biological pacemaker' tested in lab | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Grow-your-own pacemakers are a step closer to reality, after pioneering experiments in pigs.
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Young mice blood may hold key to age-related diseases in humans - video

New studies suggest blood from young mice has rejuvenating effects on older mice, and may lead to new therapeutic approaches to age-related diseases in humans

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A Continuous Semantic Space Describes the Representation of Thousands of Object and Action Categories across the Human Brain

A Continuous Semantic Space Describes the Representation of Thousands of Object and Action Categories across the Human Brain | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Humans can see and name thousands of distinct object and action categories, so it is unlikely that each category is represented in a distinct brain area. A more efficient scheme would be to represent categories as locations in a continuous semantic space mapped smoothly across the cortical surface. To search for such a space, we used fMRI to measure human brain activity evoked by natural movies. We then used voxelwise models to examine the cortical representation of 1,705 object and action categories. The first few dimensions of the underlying semantic space were recovered from the fit models by principal components analysis. Projection of the recovered semantic space onto cortical flat maps shows that semantic selectivity is organized into smooth gradients that cover much of visual and nonvisual cortex. Furthermore, both the recovered semantic space and the cortical organization of the space are shared across different individuals.

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Research sheds new light on impact of diabetes on the brain

Research sheds new light on impact of diabetes on the brain | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust have discovered diabetic nerve damage causes more harm in the brain than previously thought, shedding new light on the disease.
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Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancer May be Effective

Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancer May be Effective | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
A US team has developed an ultra-sensitive way of detecting tumor DNA in the bloodstream, bringing closer the prospect of a simple general blood test for diverse solid cancers.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 8, 9:19 AM

Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine have devised an ultra-sensitive method for finding DNA from cancer tumors in the bloodstream. The new method identified around half of patients with stage 1 lung cancer and all patients with stage 2 or higher disease.

Cancer cells divide and die, even without treatment. When a cancer cell dies, the DNA in its nucleus escapes into the bloodstream. This is present in small concentrations - something like 1 in 1,000 or 10,000 bits of DNA in the blood can be from a dead cancer cell in a person with cancer.

So a test that can quickly and non-invasively monitor the tiny concentrations of cancer cell DNA would be really useful to clinicians who need to estimate the size of the tumor, how it changes over time, and monitor a patient's response to treatment.



The team found a way to do this by boosting existing methods for extracting, processing and analyzing the DNA. They called their approach CAPP-Seq (which is short for Cancer Personalized Profiling by deep Sequencing).

The researchers say CAPP-Seq may also have potential as a prognostic tool. When they tested one patient thought to have been successfully treated for lung cancer, they found low levels of circulating tumor DNA. The cancer came back in that patient, and they died

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Top 10 Israeli Advances In Autism

Top 10 Israeli Advances In Autism | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
From research to social and educational programs, Israel excels in the struggle to understand autism and help families deal with this developmental disorder.
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World's first computational psychiatry centre opens in London

World's first computational psychiatry centre opens in London | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Centre will use latest technology to gain insights into human cognition and learn how it becomes disrupted in disorders

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The worlds' first computational psychiatry centre has opened in London with a mission to shine a new light on human cognition and understand how it becomes disrupted in disorders such as depression and dementia.

Backed by a five-year €5m (£4.1m) investment from the Max Planck Society and UCL, the centre, which is named after its funders and will be based in London and Berlin, will use powerful modern technology in an effort to create more detailed models than ever before of how the human brain works.

Professor Ray Dolan, academic co-leader of the centre, said: "The brain is at some level an information processing machine and we have to understand what it's doing and how that information processor is working. We are trying to understand normal cognition with respect to the type of processes that go awry in psychiatric disorders and in ageing, we then intend to apply these models to understand ageing, depression or any other psychiatric disorders where we think the models may be appropriate. "


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Stanford bioengineers close to brewing opioid painkillers | KurzweilAI

Stanford bioengineers close to brewing opioid painkillers | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Stanford Bioengineer Christina Smolke has been on a decade-long quest to genetically alter yeast so they can brew opioid medicines in stainless steel vats,

Stanford bioengineers have hacked the DNA of yeast, reprograming these simple cells to make opioid-based medicines* via a sophisticated extension of the basic brewing process that makes beer.

Led by Associate Professor of Bioengineering Christina Smolke, the Stanford team has already spent a decade genetically engineering yeast cells to reproduce the biochemistry of poppies, with the ultimate goal of producing opium-based medicines, from start to finish, in fermentation vats.

“We are now very close to replicating the entire opioid production process in a way that eliminates the need to grow poppies, allowing us to reliably manufacture essential medicines while mitigating the potential for diversion to illegal use,” said Smolke, who outlines her work in the August 24 edition of Nature Chemical Biology.

Smolke added five genes from two different organisms to yeast cells. Three of these genes came from the poppy itself, and the others from a bacterium that lives on poppy plant stalks.


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Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds? | ucsf.edu

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds? | ucsf.edu | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
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Researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

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Pasquale Valente's curator insight, August 22, 4:57 AM

Researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

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Implanted neuronal stem cells generate neurons and synapses, becoming a functioning part of mouse brain | KurzweilAI

Implanted neuronal stem cells generate neurons and synapses, becoming a functioning part of mouse brain | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

Part of a brain slice showing a functioning transplanted induced neural stem cell (green) fully integrated in the neuronal network of the brain (blue) (credit:


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Ebola virus disease (EVD), implications of introduction in the America

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Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects

Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days.

Although type 2 diabetes can sometimes be managed through a healthy diet and regular exercise in the initial stages, tablets that boost the body's production of insulin are generally prescribed as the disease progresses. Such tablets can have side effects, including nausea and diarrhea, and aren't suitable for everyone, such as pregnant women and those with severe liver, kidney or heart disease. They can also cause blood glucose levels to drop too low, potentially resulting in hypoglycemia.

Now Salk researchers have found that injecting obese mice with the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans with a single dose of protein FGF1 quickly restored their blood glucose levels to normal levels where they remained for more than two days. Importantly, even when given high doses, the mice suffered none of the side effects common to most current diabetes treatments, such as weight gain or heart and liver problems.


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Hieu Ngo's curator insight, August 6, 10:38 PM

There are so many diseases and health problems out there. Just as it seems when we might have gotten rid of a problem/disease, a new one pops up to take its place. Yet, this article shows that we can and will adapt as we have time and time again. Mankind will continue living on. Curing type 2 diabetes in mice is just a small step in curing type 2 diabetes in people. But sometimes, one small step can make all the difference.

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MP-MRI-US Fusion Targeted Biopsy: A Promising New Diagnostic Tool for Prostate Cancer

MP-MRI-US Fusion Targeted Biopsy: A Promising New Diagnostic Tool for Prostate Cancer | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Specialized software now combines multiparametric MRI and transrectal ultrasound images to improve targeted biopsy of suspicious lesions. The technology has the potential to significantly improve localization and characterization of prostate cancer when added to a 12-core biopsy.
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WHO/Europe | Country profiles on noncommunicable diseases published

WHO/Europe | Country profiles on noncommunicable diseases published | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
WHO has published profiles on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) for all Member States, including the 53 countries in the WHO European Region. Where data are available, the profiles estimate for each country the current burden of and recent trends in NCD mortality, the prevalence of selected major risk factors and the national health system’s capacity to respond. They update the profiles produced in 2011.
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Skin layer grown from human stem cells could replace animals in drug and cosmetics testing | KurzweilAI

Skin layer grown from human stem cells could replace animals in drug and cosmetics testing | KurzweilAI | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it

An international team led by King’s College London and the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center (SFVAMC) has developed the first lab-grown epidermis (the outermost skin layer) with a functional permeability barrier akin to real skin.

The new epidermis, grown from human pluripotent stem cells, offers a cost-effective alternative lab model for testing drugs and cosmetics, and could also help to develop new therapies for rare and common skin disorders.

The epidermis, the outermost layer of human skin, forms a protective interface between the body and its external environment, preventing water from escaping and microbes and toxins from entering.

Tissue engineers have been unable to grow epidermis with the functional barrier needed for drug testing or produce an in vitro (lab) model for large-scale drug screening. That’s because the number of cells that can be grown from a single skin biopsy sample has been limited.

The new study, published in the journal Stem Cell Reports (open access), describes the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) (stem cells that can develop into different types of body cells) to produce an unlimited supply of pure keratinocytes (the predominant cell type in the outermost layer of skin). These new keratinocytes closely match keratinocytes generated from other stem-cell types: human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and primary keratinocytes from skin biopsies.


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Revealed: Scientists ‘edit’ DNA to correct adult genes and cure diseases

Revealed: Scientists ‘edit’ DNA to correct adult genes and cure diseases | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
A genetic disease has been cured in living, adult animals for the first time using a revolutionary genome-editing technique that can make the smallest changes to the vast database of the DNA molecule with pinpoint accuracy.

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Coxsackievirus B4 can infect human pancreas ductal cells and persist... [Cell Mol Life Sci. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract

The role of enteroviruses, especially Coxsackievirus B (CVB), in type 1 diabetes is suspected, but the mechanisms of the virus-induced or aggravated pathogenesis of the disease are unknown. The hypothesis of an enterovirus-induced disturbance of pancreatic β-cells regeneration has been investigated in the human system. The infection of human pancreas ductal cells and pancreatic duct cell line, PANC-1, with CVB4E2 has been studied. Primary ductal cells and PANC-1 cells were infectable with CVB4E2 and a RT-PCR assay without extraction displayed that a larger proportion of cells harbored viral RNA than predicted by the detection of the viral capsid protein VP1 by indirect immunofluorescence. The detection of intracellular positive- and negative-strands of enterovirus genomes in cellular extracts by RT-PCR and the presence of infectious particles in supernatant fluids during the 37 weeks of monitoring demonstrated that CVB4E2 could persist in the pancreatic duct cell line. A persistent infection of these cells resulted in an impaired expression of Pdx1, a transcription factor required for the formation of endocrine pancreas, and a disturbed formation of islet-like cell aggregates of which the viability was decreased. These data support the hypothesis of an impact of enteroviruses onto pancreatic ductal cells which are involved in the renewal of pancreatic β-cells.

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Vibration may help heal chronic wounds

Vibration may help heal chronic wounds | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Wounds may heal more quickly if exposed to low-intensity vibration, report researchers. The finding, in mice, may hold promise for the 18 million Americans who have type 2 diabetes, and especially the quarter of them who will eventually suffer from foot ulcers. Their wounds tend to heal slowly and can become chronic or worsen rapidly.
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Bach2 maintains T cells in a naive state by suppressing effector memory-related genes

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Evaluating Online Sources of Health Information - National Cancer Institute

Evaluating Online Sources of Health Information - National Cancer Institute | Salus (Health) | Scoop.it
Information to help people evaluate the source and credibility of health information that they find online.
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