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Safe Schools & Communities Resources
This collection includes resources for preventing school violence and creating safe schools and communities. For other education collections, please visit http://bit.ly/edpsychtech, http://bit.ly/SEL_Resources, http://bit.ly/new_standards, and http://bit.ly/testing_testing. For events and resources specific to Santa Clara County, please visit: http://www.scoop.it/t/santa-clara-county-resources
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Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) is the nation’s leading organization advancing the development of academic, social and emotional competence for all students. Our mission is to help make evidence-based social and emotional learning an integral part of education from preschool through high school. Through research, practice and policy, CASEL collaborates to ensure all students become knowledgeable, responsible, caring and contributing members of society."


http://www.casel.org


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These are goals parents, communities and educators at all levels should strive to acheive. 

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A Radical Approach to Discipline That Starts With Listening to Students

A Radical Approach to Discipline That Starts With Listening to Students | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

BY Meredith Kolodner, Hechinger Report
"NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Having racked up multiple up absences and missed assignments, a high school sophomore showed up in his English class last year, hopeful for another chance. “Where have you been?” his teacher asked. “You can’t pass this class if you don’t show up.” Without warning, the young man exploded.

 

“Shut the f— up,” the 16-year-old shouted. “You think you’re better than me? Who the f— do you think you are?” He stormed out of the room.

As the screaming and the swearing escalated in the hall, the Metropolitan Business Academy principal, Judith Puglisi, was called. She approached the student. “What do you need?” she asked in an almost-whisper. He kept yelling and pacing, and Puglisi walked with him, she recalled.

After she quietly repeated her question close to a dozen times, he turned to her and said, “I need to come to your office.” There, Puglisi and the assistant principal listened to him shout until he began to cry, telling them that his stepfather had beaten him since he was 7. “I am sick of people calling me a loser,” he said.


The student was not suspended, which would be normal protocol at some schools for cursing at a teacher. Instead, he saw a drama therapist trained in trauma at Metropolitan the next day. The day after that, he met with the teacher, apologized and said he knew he had overreacted. He returned to the class immediately after that meeting.

 

“If you run a school that’s based on punishment and compliance, eventually you’re going to push kids out.” — Judith Puglisi, principal of Metropolitan Business Academy


“Some would say that punishment will extinguish bad behavior, but I would say the opposite,” said Puglisi, who recounted the incident under the condition that the student’s name be withheld for his protection.

 

Metropolitan is among a small but growing number of schools nationally that are turning the traditional approach to discipline on its head. Instead of trying to get students to leave their personal troubles at the door, these schools help kids cope with what often is a history of trauma. The idea is to catch problems before they become disciplinary issues resulting in suspensions or expulsions.


Metropolitan and a dozen other schools in Connecticut work with Animated Learning by Integrating and Validating Experience (ALIVE), a trauma response program that provides drama therapists to work with teachers to identify trauma, prevent problems from escalating and respond effectively when students do act out. The therapists — who hold master’s degrees with training in psychology and theater — offer one-on-one therapy and use drama and role playing in a mandatory class for freshmen."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/zero-tolerance-fails-schools-teaching-students-cope-trauma/

 

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Trauma-Sensitive Schools: A Whole-School Approach // Trauma Sensitive Schools

Trauma-Sensitive Schools: A Whole-School Approach // Trauma Sensitive Schools | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
Trauma-Sensitive Schools and Safe and Supportive Schools benefit all children. TLPI embraces a whole-school approach that enables all children to achieve.

 

http://traumasensitiveschools.org/

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Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators / Caja de Herramientas Para Educadores Para el Manejo de Trauma Infantil // National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators / Caja de Herramientas Para Educadores Para el Manejo de Trauma Infantil // National Child Traumatic Stress Network | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Research suggests that approximately 25% of American children will experience at least one traumatic event by the age of 16. A child's reactions to trauma can interfere considerably with learning and/or behavior at school. However, schools also serve as a critical system of support for children who have experienced trauma.

 

Administrators, teachers, and staff can help reduce the impact of trauma on children by recognizing trauma responses, accommodating and responding to traumatized students within the classroom setting, and referring children to outside professionals when necessary. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has developed tools and materials to help educators understand and respond to the specific needs of traumatized children."

 

http://www.nctsn.org/resources/audiences/school-personnel/trauma-toolkit

 

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Locking Up Traumatized Girls Is No Way to Help Them

Locking Up Traumatized Girls Is No Way to Help Them | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
Every day our juvenile justice system locks up girls who are victims of sexual violence, and physical and emotional abuse. In fact, we often incarcerate victimized girls in a misguided effort to provide them with services and to "protect" t...

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/francine-sherman/locking-up-traumatized-girls-is-no-way-to-help-them_b_6929764.html


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Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit // Common Sense Media

Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit // Common Sense Media | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Every day, you see how cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? What can you do today that will help your students avoid this pitfall of our digital world?
We created this free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against cyberbullying. So start here. Use it now. Rely on it to start your year off right." Common Sense Media


http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/cyberbullying-toolkit

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Bullying Prevention Hub // Facebook

Bullying Prevention Hub // Facebook | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
Tools, tips and programs that help people stand up for each other.

 

https://www.facebook.com/safety/bullying

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Restorative Practices Quickly Cut Suspensions in Middle School // EdSource

Restorative Practices Quickly Cut Suspensions in Middle School // EdSource | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"There are often expectations for a new superintendent to make an immediate impact in his or her district. That was the case when I became superintendent at Standard School District in Bakersfield in November 2013, just as the new Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) was unfolding.

 

Being new to the district and the area, the needs assessment required by the LCAP served me well as an educational leader. It didn’t take long to identify the areas of need or to come to agreement on how to address them.

 

One area of need in our K-8 district with nearly 3,000 students was to reduce the number of suspensions. In 2013, the number of student suspensions at our middle school was extremely high – over three times the state suspension rate. Budget cuts over several years had reduced the middle school administrative team and, with over 900 students in 6th to 8th grades, it was clear that the team was operating in survival mode. We needed to provide more support for students and staff and find a program that offered a long-term solution to address student misbehavior as well as guide future behavior.

 

In addition to suspending students and sending them home for violating school rules, the middle school was using an in-house suspension program called Opportunity Class, or “Op,” as it was called by the students and staff. Op was basically a holding tank where misbehaving students were sent for a day or several days as a consequence for disrupting the school environment. Op was punitive in nature, and the students were expected to remain quiet and do their schoolwork. For the Op teacher, the focus was on managing the class and there was little time available for any type of intervention. The Op program had no real impact on changing or improving student behavior, and as a result many students were repeat offenders or “frequent flyers.”
 

In January 2014, our director of student services Denita Maughan heard about a promising program. While attending the ACSA Pupil Services Academy, she met two administrators, Barbara Perez and Barry Tyler, from Oceanside Unified School District, north of San Diego. They shared their strategy to reduce suspensions,  which was based on the principles of restorative practices. Following that meeting, Dr. Maughan visited the continuation school in Oceanside where the program was being implemented. She was convinced that it could be adapted to work at the middle school level. Our contacts at Oceanside agreed to help us implement a similar program, and we drew up a consulting contract with them to help us do so.

 

Thanks to increased state funding as a result of the Local Control Funding Formula, we were able to improve our student support services by providing a full-time school psychologist to each of our schools. We formed a middle school “Alternative to Suspension” team consisting of the site administration (principal and two assistant principals), a campus supervisor, school counselor, school psychologist, social work intern and the ATS teacher (formally the Op teacher). Each staff member plays an important role.

In addition to providing counseling, our school counselor and school psychologist play a vital role by teaching students how to acknowledge and own their behavior and to make amends with those individuals they have harmed both directly and indirectly. In order to prepare the apology, they conduct role-playing scenarios so students have the confidence to make a sincere attempt to repair relationships that were impacted by their behavior.

 

Alternative to Suspension is based on restorative practices that originated in the criminal justice system as an alternative to punishment and incarceration. Adapted for use in schools, restorative practices are used as an alternative to suspension by using a set of principles and strategies to encourage students to accept responsibility for their behavior and repair any harm caused by their actions. The foundation of restorative practices is based on the core values of respect, inclusion, responsibility, empathy, honesty, openness and accountability."...

 

For full post, click on title able or here: 

http://edsource.org/2015/restorative-practices-cut-suspensions-in-middle-school/76143#.VQPiwGSS0mc

 

 

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Bully Prevention Resources from PBIS

Bully Prevention Resources from PBIS | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

This link includes curricula and resources for Bullying Prevention from the Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports Training and Technical Assistance Center
http://www.pbis.org/school/bully-prevention

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Connections Between Bullying and Other Types of Violence //

Connections Between Bullying and Other Types of Violence // | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Connections Between Bullying and Other Types of Violence"

 

Family Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Dating Violence
Thursday, March 26, 2015 12:00:00 PM PDT - 01:00:00 PM PDT

The Children’s Safety Network invites you to the first in a series of webinars on the issue of bullying awareness, response, and prevention based on the “Building Capacity to Reduce Bullying and Its Impact on Youth Across the Lifecourse” workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) in April 2014.

This first webinar in our series is entitled “The Connections between Bullying and Family Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Dating Violence” and explores youth aggression and bullying, sexual harassment, and dating violence which are widespread public health concerns. During the webinar, Dr. Dorothy Espelage will describe the longitudinal study she and her colleagues conducted, which examined the impact of family abuse and conflict, anger, self-reported delinquency, alcohol use, and peer delinquency on the development of bullying perpetration, sexual harassment perpetration, and teen dating violence perpetration among a large sample of early adolescents.

 

Dr. Espelage will discuss the findings from this study, drawing out important overlaps between bullying, family violence, sexual harassment, and dating violence, and the implications these overlaps have for designing and implementing interventions.

 

Learning Objectives:

• Explore the ways in which bullying and family violence, sexual harassment, and dating violence interrelate

• Understand other predictors and risk factors for bullying and how it varies by age group, gender, and race/ethnicity

• Clarify the factors that must be taken into consideration in designing and implementing effective bullying prevention interventions

 

This webinar series is being conducted in conjunction with a series of blogs that will appear on the StopBullying.gov website. To read the blogs, visit: http://www.stopbullying.gov/blog.

 

For full link, click on title above or here: 

https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1002235226/en/events/event/private/1318643947/1614510903/event_landing.html?sco-id=1739385395&_charset_=utf-8

 

To register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1002235226/en/events/event/private/1318643947/1614510903/event_registration.html?sco-id=1739385395&nbsp

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Safe School Ambassadors Program (SSA) // Community Matters

Safe School Ambassadors Program (SSA) // Community Matters | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"The key to having safer schools - as well as increasing attendance, achievement and graduation rates - is by adopting and implementing an Inside-out Approach, one that focuses on:
* Strengthening the relationships among the youth and adults
* Viewing students as resources and contributors
* Utilizing restorative justice practices and policies
* Changing the social norms that allow bullying to occur."...
 

http://community-matters.org/

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The School to Prison Pipeline by Advancement Project // The Advancement Project

Harsh school policies and practices and an increased role of law enforcement in schools have combined to create a "schoolhouse-to-prison pipeline," in which ...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnGctoUq-fA

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When Traditional Disciplinary Actions Don’t Work, Restorative Justice Can Bring About the Healing Process

When Traditional Disciplinary Actions Don’t Work, Restorative Justice Can Bring About the Healing Process | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

Friday, November 7, Thomas MacMillan, Nation Swell

 

"Professor Carolyn Boyes-Watson remembers getting a call from distressed administrators at a Boston high school: “We have so many girls fighting,” they said, “we’re picking up clumps of hair in the hallways.”


Students were yanking each other’s hair out while brawling in the school’s corridors and cafeteria, and administrators couldn’t figure out how to make the violence stop.


So they called in Boyes-Watson, a sociology professor at Suffolk University in Boston, to train students and teachers in a conflict-resolution practice known as restorative justice. Drawing from Native American traditions, the concept uses ritualized dialogue to try to mend broken communities. Participants gather in circles to try to resolve problems through discussion, rather than retribution.
Across the country, more and more schools are turning to restorative justice as they realize that traditional disciplinary measures — suspensions and expulsions — often don’t deter misbehavior, but can instead set troubled students up for failure by further disengaging them from school.


While traditional justice systems are based on punishing perpetrators (usually by ostracizing or isolating them), restorative justice focuses on healing the harm that has been inflicted — personally and community-wide. Restorative justice programs in schools seek to establish cultures of openness, communication and respect.
Boyes-Watson helped the Boston school set up a practice in which groups of students and teachers met regularly to discuss problems while sitting in a circle. “The kids absolutely take to the circle immediately,” Boyes-Watson says. “They treat each other better. They’re kinder to one another. They feel a sense of belonging and connection. It’s really quite simple. … It’s a small intervention that makes such a powerful difference.”


The effect was transformative. By the following year, the school had solved the problem of girls fighting — no more brawls in the halls.

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.dignityinschools.org/news/when-traditional-disciplinary-actions-don%E2%80%99t-work-restorative-justice-can-bring-about-healing-pr

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Respect Zone // RespectZone.org

Respect Zone // RespectZone.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

Social Media Movement to promote Respect in Schools http://respectzone.org/en/

 

RespectZone Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/respectzonehpi?fref=ts&nbsp

 

And for more International Research and Perspectives on School Violence Prevention Research: http://www.ijvs.org/index.php

 

 

 

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Resources for Social & Emotional Learning

Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

http://www.scoop.it/t/resources-for-teaching-about-social-emotional-learning

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Oakland to Halt School Suspensions for Willful Defiance // SFGate

Oakland to Halt School Suspensions for Willful Defiance // SFGate | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

By Jill Tucker
"Mouthing off in class or failing to follow a teacher’s instructions will no longer lead to suspension in Oakland schools, a ban that will be phased in and be fully in effect just over a year from now, the school board unanimously decided Wednesday night. Oakland Unified will become one of a handful of California school districts that restrict suspensions to more serious offenses and eliminate the punishment for willful defiance — a broad category of misbehavior that includes minor offenses such as refusing to take a hat off or ignoring teacher requests to stop texting and more severe incidents like swearing at a teacher or storming out of class

 

Oakland has been criticized for the disproportionate suspensions, leading to an investigation by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and a 2012 voluntary agreement that required the district to employ a range of practices that reduced suspensions. Among them are the district’s Manhood Development classes for African American males as well as restorative justice, which requires victims and offenders to talk about the behavior and ways to address it. Willful defiance suspensions for African American students in Oakland declined from 1,050 incidents in 2011 to 630 in 2014, according to district officials. Community activists from the Black Organizing Project, Public Counsel and Californians for Justice, among others, applauded the school board vote, but said more was needed to address the needs of disadvantaged students in the district. Members of those organizations urged the district to pour at least $2.3 million into alternative discipline programs, including Manhood Development and restorative justice, which Superintendent Antwan Wilson vowed to include in his budget for the 2015-16 school year."...

 

 

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Oakland-to-halt-school-suspensions-for-willful-6262461.php

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Restorative Schools Vision Project

Restorative Schools Vision Project | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"The Restorative Schools Vision Project (RSVP) was founded as a response to the crisis in public school education brought about by the disproportionate impact of suspensions and expulsions on students of color, students with disabilities, LGBTQ youth, and other marginalized groups. We view the solution to the crisis as requiring a paradigm shift in school discipline away from punishment and zero tolerance and towards restorative justice, social emotional learning, and positive responses based on secular ethics. We believe that students can learn from their mistakes and that their mistakes should not be treated like quasi-criminal behavior. We teach a restorative process that combines the best of Restorative Justice (RJ), Social Emotional Learning (SEL), and Narrative Practices (separating the person from the problem).
 

We emphasize healing outcomes over and above formulaic procedures, favor collaborative solutions over authoritarian outcomes, and believe that relationships rather than rules are the key to lasting, positive changes in school climate. In sum, our training philosophy is solutions oriented."... 

 

For more on the Restorative Schools Vision Project, please visit http://restorativeschoolsproject.org/  and
http://restorativeschoolsproject.org/about-us/
 

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Clint Smith: The Danger of Silence

"We spend so much time listening to the things people are saying that we rarely pay attention to the things they don't," says slam poet and teacher Clint Smith."

 

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Restoring Justice // Chicago's School to Prison Pipeline

"Chicago’s school discipline policies have unintended consequences. Is there a better way? Young filmmakers from Free Spirit Media explore causes and solutions to Chicago's school-to-prison-pipeline. 

Are CPS policies on discipline effective? Share your comments below or at www.schoolprojectfilm.com. Please subscribe for more & follow the discussion at: https://facebook.com/theschoolproject
https://twitter.com/theschoolpr (#TheSchoolProject)"...


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Investing in School Culture and Climate // Jovan Miles

Investing in School Culture and Climate // Jovan Miles | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

 By Jovan Miles

"My school just wrapped up its first successful Field Day (May Day to you old folks) for the first time in three years. Staff members have shared many different stories about prior Field Day events, but the long and short of it is that for one reason or another they weren’t successful. Now, as I’ve written in the past, I work at an inner city school and unfortunately that usually means that a culture of low expectations for students’ academic performance as well as their behavior tends to infiltrate the hearts and minds of some of the people charged with creating an environment that is not only conducive for learning, but one that feels inclusive, safe, and enjoyable. I believe that past Field Days may have been failures because members of the staff had low expectations of our students and their parents and these low expectations prevented them from putting in the work needed to ensure that an undertaking the size of Field Day was a success. I’m speculating, of course, but lots of signs pointed me in the direction of my previously mentioned conclusion.

 

I worked on the planning committee for this event with the intention of working with the team to create an event fit for my own children. This meant that Field Day needed to be safe, orderly, highly structured, and that the planning team had to consider, and plan for, a number of different contingencies. I’m happy to say that all went as planned yesterday and that the kids had a great time. 9 people successfully managed fun and games for approximately 600 people…on a shoestring budget. At the end of the day I felt like we were the 2004 Detroit Pistons, a rag tag collection of role players who put numbers on the boards for our team; the learning community at Margaret Fain Elementary School.

 

A rather welcome, but unforeseen, consequence of the day was that our parents, who up until yesterday seemed to me to be rather disengaged from the school, came out in droves to help work with the staff to make sure that the day was a success. I spoke with a number of these parents who expressed their pleasure in being able to come to the school to support their children. Some shared with me that they felt welcome at the school for the first time in years. Others expressed a desire to participate in more events at the school."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here:  

http://jovanmiles.com/investing-in-school-culture-and-climate/

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Small Samples Don’t Speak “Truth” // Cyberbullying Research Center

Small Samples Don’t Speak “Truth” // Cyberbullying Research Center | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

By Justin Patchin, Ph.D.

"Our primary mission at the Cyberbullying Research Center is to translate the research we and others do into something that is meaningful and interpretable to teens, parents, educators, and others dedicated to preventing and responding more effectively to cyberbullying. When we first launched this website (10 years ago!), there wasn’t much research being done, and so it was easy to keep up. These days, however, many scholars are putting cyberbullying under the microscope, which is a very good thing. It is important to recognize, though, that not all studies are created equal. In this post I’d like to discuss one particular problem: small sample sizes. And, to be more specific, I am most concerned with the way some media reports portray results from these studies to be definitive.

For illustration purposes, I’d like to highlight two recently-published papers that gained some measure of attention by the media in the last few weeks. I think they attracted this interest, in part, because their findings speak to the conventional wisdom regarding cyberbullying (that is, that traditional bullying is worse than cyberbullying, and that no one really wants to intervene when they see it happen). I’m all for using data to help validate or refute commonly-held beliefs about cyberbullying. Many of the media reports about these papers, however, make broad, seemingly conclusive generalized statements based on the perspectives or experiences of a very small group of students."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://cyberbullying.us/small-samples-dont-speak-truth/

 

 

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Preventing Cyberbullying: Top Ten Tips for Educators // Cyberbullying Research Center

http://www.cyberbullying.us/Top_Ten_Tips_Educators_Cyberbullying_Prevention.pdf

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A Teenager’s View on Social Media // Andrew Watts, BackChannel

A Teenager's View on Social Media - Backchannel - Medium

https://medium.com/backchannel/a-teenagers-view-on-social-media-1df945c09ac6

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ChildTrauma.org

ChildTrauma.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"CTA is a not-for-profit organization based in Houston, Texas working to improve the lives of high-risk children through direct service, research and education. We recognize the crucial importance of childhood experience in shaping the health of the individual, and ultimately, society. By creating biologically-informed child and family respectful practice, programs and policy, CTA seeks to help maltreated and traumatized children." 

 

http://childtrauma.org  

 

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Far From Being Harmless, the Effects of Bullying Last Long Into Adulthood // APS

Far From Being Harmless, the Effects of Bullying Last Long Into Adulthood // APS | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

 

"A new study shows that serious illness, struggling to hold down a regular job, and poor social relationships are just some of the adverse outcomes in adulthood faced by those exposed to bullying in childhood.

 

It has long been acknowledged that bullying at a young age presents a problem for schools, parents and public policy makers alike. Although children spend more time with their peers than their parents, there is relatively little published research on understanding the impact of these interactions on their lives beyond school. 

 

The results of the new study, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, highlight the extent to which the risk of problems related to health, poverty, and social relationships are heightened by exposure to bullying. The study is notable because it looks into many factors that go beyond health-related outcomes.

 

Psychological scientists Dieter Wolke of the University of Warwick and William E. Copeland of Duke University Medical Center led the research team, looking beyond the study of victims and investigating the impact on all those affected: the victims, the bullies themselves, and those who fall into both categories, so-called “bully-victims.”

 

“We cannot continue to dismiss bullying as a harmless, almost inevitable, part of growing up,” says Wolke. “We need to change this mindset and acknowledge this as a serious problem for both the individual and the country as a whole; the effects are long-lasting and significant.”

 

The ‘bully-victims’ were at greatest risk for health problems in adulthood, over six times more likely to be diagnosed with a serious illness, smoke regularly, or develop a psychiatric disorder compared to those not involved in bullying."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/far-from-being-harmless-the-effects-of-bullying-last-long-into-adulthood.html

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ConnectSafely.org

ConnectSafely.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Welcome to ConnectSafely.org ConnectSafely is a nonprofit organization for parents, teens, educators, advocates – everyone engaged in and interested in the impact of social media and mobile technology. Here you’ll find tips, safety advice, articles, news, analysis, video and other resources to promote safe, effective use of connected technology."...

 

For main website, click here:

http://www.connectsafely.org 

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