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Safe Schools & Communities
Resources for preventing school violence and creating safe schools & communities
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CASEL | Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning

CASEL | Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

Excellent resources and research on the benefits of integrating social and emotional learning into learning environments.

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Discipline With Dignity: Oakland Classrooms Try Healing Instead of Punishment

Discipline With Dignity: Oakland Classrooms Try Healing Instead of Punishment | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it
As executive director of Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth, Fania Davis sees programs like hers as part of the way to end the school-to-prison pipeline.

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/education-uprising/where-dignity-is-part-of-the-school-day

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School Discipline Consensus Report: Strategies from the Field to Keep Students Engaged in School and Out of the Juvenile Justice System - CSG Justice Center

School Discipline Consensus Report: Strategies from the Field to Keep Students Engaged in School and Out of the Juvenile Justice System - CSG Justice Center | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

Released June 3rd, 2014

 

"The School Discipline Consensus Report presents a comprehensive set of consensus-based and field-driven recommendations to improve conditions for learning for all students and educators, better support students with behavioral needs, improve police-schools partnerships, and keep students out of the juvenile justice system for minor offenses.


More than 100 advisors representing policymakers, school administrators, teachers, behavioral health professionals, police, court leaders, probation officials, juvenile correctional leaders, parents, and youth from across the country helped develop more than two dozen policies and 60 recommendations to keep more students in productive classrooms and out of court rooms.


An additional 600 individuals from various disciplines and perspectives shared examples of promising practices that are also presented in the report. The School Discipline Consensus Report draws on real-world strategies and research to promote truly multidisciplinary approaches to reducing the millions of youth suspended, expelled, and arrested each year while creating safe and supportive schools for all educators and students."...

For main website, click on title above or here: http://csgjusticecenter.org/youth/projects/school-discipline-consensus-project/

 

To download report, click here: 

http://csgjusticecenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/The_School_Discipline_Consensus_Report.pdf

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Decreasing Suspensions by Increasing School Engagement - Strategies and Resources for Efforts to Improve School Climate

Decreasing Suspensions by Increasing School Engagement - Strategies and Resources for Efforts to Improve School Climate | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"This learning board includes resources provided at the 2014 Santa Clara County Children's Summit for the "Decreasing Suspensions by Increasing School Engagement: Strategies for Change" presentation." 

Click on title above or here: http://bit.ly/respectyouth  

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SAMSHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

SAMSHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than 200 interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment. We connect members of the public to intervention developers so they can learn how to implement these approaches in their communities. NREPP is not an exhaustive list of interventions, and inclusion in the registry does not constitute an endorsement."

 

http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/

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Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit | Common Sense Media

Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit | Common Sense Media | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"Every day, you see how cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? What can you do today that will help your students avoid this pitfall of our digital world?
We created this free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against cyberbullying. So start here. Use it now. Rely on it to start your year off right." Common Sense Media


http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/cyberbullying-toolkit

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Far From Being Harmless, the Effects of Bullying Last Long Into Adulthood - APS

Far From Being Harmless, the Effects of Bullying Last Long Into Adulthood - APS | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

 

"A new study shows that serious illness, struggling to hold down a regular job, and poor social relationships are just some of the adverse outcomes in adulthood faced by those exposed to bullying in childhood.

 

It has long been acknowledged that bullying at a young age presents a problem for schools, parents and public policy makers alike. Although children spend more time with their peers than their parents, there is relatively little published research on understanding the impact of these interactions on their lives beyond school. 

 

The results of the new study, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, highlight the extent to which the risk of problems related to health, poverty, and social relationships are heightened by exposure to bullying. The study is notable because it looks into many factors that go beyond health-related outcomes.

 

Psychological scientists Dieter Wolke of the University of Warwick and William E. Copeland of Duke University Medical Center led the research team, looking beyond the study of victims and investigating the impact on all those affected: the victims, the bullies themselves, and those who fall into both categories, so-called “bully-victims.”

 

“We cannot continue to dismiss bullying as a harmless, almost inevitable, part of growing up,” says Wolke. “We need to change this mindset and acknowledge this as a serious problem for both the individual and the country as a whole; the effects are long-lasting and significant.”

 

The ‘bully-victims’ were at greatest risk for health problems in adulthood, over six times more likely to be diagnosed with a serious illness, smoke regularly, or develop a psychiatric disorder compared to those not involved in bullying."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/far-from-being-harmless-the-effects-of-bullying-last-long-into-adulthood.html

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From 'At-Risk' to 'At-Promise': Supporting Teens to Overcome Adversity: Dr. Victor Rios at TEDxUCSB

"Professor Rios' 2011 book, Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys (NYU Press), analyzes how juvenile crime policies and criminalization affect the everyday lives of urban youth."

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Safe School Ambassadors® (SSA) | Community Matters

Safe School Ambassadors® (SSA) | Community Matters | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"The key to having safer schools - as well as increasing attendance, achievement and graduation rates - is by adopting and implementing an Inside-out Approach, one that focuses on:
Strengthening the relationships among the youth and adults
Viewing students as resources and contributors
Utilizing restorative justice practices and policies
Changing the social norms that allow bullying to occur."

http://community-matters.org/

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Not On Our Campus | Not in Our Town

Not On Our Campus | Not in Our Town | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"Not In Our Town’s mission is to guide, support and inspire people and communities to work together to stop hate and build safe, inclusive environments for all.
On NIOT.org, you will find over 100+ short films to view and discuss with your community, more than 50 school films with accompanying lesson plans and activity guides, andsample materials from towns who have stood up—and worked to prevent hate and intolerance from taking a hold in their communities. Special collections include what to do when a hate group comes to town, how to address hate on your campus, and how to start an anti-bullying campaign.

Combining media, resources and engagement programs, Not In Our Town works to create a world where:
* communities are standing together against hate
* students and school leaders are working together to prevent bullying and intolerance
* law enforcement is working with communities to prevent hate violence
 Connect with us at info@niot.org or 510-268-9675 and learn more about how to start a Not In Or Town campaign, start a NIOT group in your town, launch a Not In Our School project, host a screening, or share your story with us."
 http://www.niot.org/project/notonourcampus

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The Youth Voice Project

The Youth Voice Project | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it
The Youth Voice Project presents results of a large scale study that helps youth define what works in preventing peer mistreatment at school.

 

For main website, click title above or here: http://www.youthvoiceproject.com/

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Forum with Michael Krasny on Bullying - Morning Edition KQED/NPR

Forum with Michael Krasny on Bullying - Morning Edition KQED/NPR | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"When it comes to bullying, popular students go after their social peers more than social misfits. That's according to a new study co-authored by a UC Davis sociologist, which also finds that high status kids get harassed more frequently as they climb the social hierarchy. Is bullying reaching a crisis point in U.S. schools? We'll talk with experts about the latest research on bullying in schools, and ask you about your experiences.

 

Host: Michael Krasny 

Guests:

Rick Phillips, Executive Director of Community Matters, a non-profit based in Santa Rosa

Robert Faris, Associate Professor of Sociology at UC Davis, and co-author of the study (with Diane Felmlee of Penn State)

Susan Eva Porter, Dean of Branson High School and author of "Bully Nation: Why America's Approach to Childhood Aggression is Bad for Everyone"
 

http://www.kqed.org/a/forum/R201404020900

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To Improve School Climate, Examine Recess

To Improve School Climate, Examine Recess | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

As we look at ways to create environments that allow teaching and learning to thrive, it's time to take a long, hard look at the critical role of recess in our schools. Recess has the potential to transform schools, and groups are finally speaking out about the powerful role it has in the school day, including the American Academy of Pediatrics which, earlier this year, released a policy statement to this effect. "


Via John Evans, Developmental Studies Center, Roxana Marachi, PhD
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School Climate Measurement | Safe Supporting Learning

School Climate Measurement | Safe Supporting Learning | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"School climate measurement involves a comprehensive assessment of student engagement, school safety, and the learning environment.

The measurement of school climate provides educators with the necessary data to identify school needs, set goals, and track progress toward improvement."

 

For main webpage with resources, click on title above or here: 

http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov/topic-research/school-climate-measurement

 

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NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, June 21, 8:03 PM

Here are some more measurement tools you might use to assess your school's climate.  

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Suspensions, Expulsions, Arrests Don't Work: On School Discipline, We Can Do Better // RealClearEducation

Suspensions, Expulsions, Arrests Don't Work: On School Discipline, We Can Do Better // RealClearEducation | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

By Daniel Willingham - 

Stick a few hundred kids together in a building for six hours and you can bet that a few are going to misbehave. How teachers and administrators should react to rule infractions -- especially more serious ones -- is perennial problem.  newly published report from the School Discipline Consensus Project, with over 700 experts contributing, offers the most comprehensive answer I’ve seen.
 

The reports starts with two grim facts. First, present practices are ineffective. Policies tend to focus on student removal--suspensions, expulsions and arrests—as a way to keep schools orderly and safe. But while they are removed, the offenders fall behind in their schoolwork, and removal puts them at greater risk for dropping out or getting in trouble with the law."...


For full post, click on title above.

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L.A. Judge Objects to School Police Getting Millions Reserved for Struggling Students - JJIE

L.A. Judge Objects to School Police Getting Millions Reserved for Struggling Students - JJIE | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"Los Angeles’ top juvenile court judge is objecting to a planned diversion of $13 million to school police there from state funds earmarked to provide special learning assistance to disadvantaged kids.

An unprecedented new California funding plan is poised to distribute billions across the Golden State, which has long been beleaguered by inequities in educational support in low-income communities and waves of budget cuts in more recent years. Earmarked funds are supposed to be slated specifically for low-income and foster-care kids, as well as students classified as still learning English as a second language.

 

In a June 6 letter to the Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles County Presiding Juvenile Court Judge Michael Nash said this particular pot of money should not be diverted to support the L.A. district’s own school police force, which has an annual budget of around $57 million.

 

Nash expressed “great respect” for recent efforts to reduce school suspensions and referrals to police, but said he did “not see a reasonable nexus between law enforcement and specifically improving the educational experience and outcomes for our most vulnerable student populations.”

 

“On the contrary,” the judge said, “there has been a wealth of research that indicates that aggressive security measures produce alienation and mistrust among students which, in turn, can disrupt the learning environment.

 

“This explains why, as part of a nationwide discipline reform process that has gained significant traction of late, there is a specific focus on reducing police involvement in routine school discipline matters,” Nash wrote."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://jjie.org/l-a-judge-objects-to-school-police-getting-millions-reserved-for-struggling-students/107078/

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McAfee Report: Tweens and Teens Adept at Hiding Internet Activities From Parents

McAfee Report: Tweens and Teens Adept at Hiding Internet Activities From Parents | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

Do parents really know what their children are doing online? (Have parents ever really known what their children are doing?)  The McAfee report reveals the importance of maintaining the conversation between parents and children. Most youngsters believe their parents are oblivious to their web activities, while some admit to making fake social media profiles and fudging browser histories to deceive tech-savvy ones, a new report shows.



Via Deborah Welsh, Dean J. Fusto
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Deborah Welsh's curator insight, July 27, 3:19 PM

Do parents really know what their children are doing online? (Have parents ever really known what their children are doing?)  The McAfee report reveals the importance of maintaining the conversation between parents and children. 

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Best Practices Registry | Suicide Prevention Resource Center

Best Practices Registry | Suicide Prevention Resource Center | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

 "The purpose of the Best Practices Registry (BPR) is to identify, review, and disseminate information about best practices that address specific objectives of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. The BPR is a collaborative project of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP). It is funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)." 

http://www.sprc.org/bpr

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New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail - NPR

New Approaches To Discipline Strive To Keep Kids Out Of Jail - NPR | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

Selected excerpt from NPR News story:
"...recently our public media colleagues at WNYC obtained records showing that New York City's criminal justice system processed 50 percent more juveniles in May 2013, when school was in session, than in August that same year. Two-thirds of all students arrested over the past three years were black. So were more than half of students suspended since 2001 — even though black students represent only 30 percent of the total student population in New York.

 

Some relate the seasonal difference in arrests to the increased stationing over the past two decades of police officers within schools, also known as school resource officers. As of 2010, about half of all public schools had an assigned officer. WNYC quoted former Department of Probation Commissioner Vincent Schiraldi as saying students "aren't better behaved during the summer than the winter; they're just less surveilled."

 

Others have linked the school-to-prison pipeline with "zero-tolerance policies" that mandate long suspensions for minor infractions. In December, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder condemned "unnecessarily harsh discipline policies and practices" in schools. "During critical years that are proven to impact a student's later chances for success," he said, "alarming numbers of young people are suspended, expelled, or even arrested for relatively minor transgressions like school uniform violations, schoolyard fights, or showing 'disrespect' by laughing in class."

Some schools around the country are trying new approaches to discipline designed to keep students within a school community rather than push them out."...

 

For full story, click on title above or here: 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/06/24/324865857/new-approaches-to-discipline-strive-to-keep-kids-out-of-jail

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Yik Yak, Other Anonymous Social Media Apps Pose Problems For Schools - NewsObserver.com

"Cyberbullies across the country are using Yik Yak and other anonymous apps, which has triggered concerns for schools about how students use social media.


Yik Yak, an app which allows users to write 200-character posts that can be read by people within 1.5 miles, is part of the social media cyberbullying phenomena, which has changed how teenagers experience bullying. A generation ago, most bullied students could escape at home or with peers.


However, unlike words scribbled on a bathroom stall or notes slipped in someone's locker, social media posts can go viral, follow students home and reach a larger audience. And as schools struggle to keep pace with teens who simply download the newest app, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools is getting creative with how to curb cyberbullying."...


For full post, click on title above or here:



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Analysis: 'Willful Defiance' School Suspensions Have Health Impacts

Analysis: 'Willful Defiance' School Suspensions Have Health Impacts | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"In the 2012-13 school year, almost 260,000 student suspensions in California public schools — more than 40 percent of the total — were for "willful defiance" of authority. Willful defiance was the single most common reason for suspension and more students were suspended for willful defiance than for drugs, weapons and violence combined.

 

Mirroring a nationwide shift from "zero tolerance" policies that grew out of the War on Drugs, some large school districts in the state, including Los Angeles and San Francisco, have banned willful defiance suspensions. Legislation that would end the practice statewide, AB 420 by California state Assemblymember Roger Dickinson of Sacramento, stalled during last session due to fears of another veto by the governor but will be considered again this year.

 

The Health Officers Association of California, representing the physician health officers in 61 counties and cities, commissioned Human Impact Partners to analyze the results of banning willful defiance suspensions. The analysis shows that such suspensions are not just an educational issue, but have far-reaching impacts on public health and well-being that affect all Californians"...

 

For full post, click on title above or link here: http://www.reportingonhealth.org/2014/04/29/health-impacts-willful-defiance-school-suspensions

 

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Eliminating Excessive and Unfair Exclusionary Discipline in Schools: Policy Recommendations for Reducing Disparities. Losen, D., Hewitt, D., & Toldson, I. (2014)

To download the document, please click on the title above. 

 

For more information about the Discipline Disparities Research-To-Practice Collaborative, please visit: http://rtpcollaborative.indiana.edu/

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TEDxHampshireCollege - Jay Smooth - How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Discussing Race - YouTube

"Jay Smooth is host of New York's longest running hip-hop radio show, the Underground Railroad on WBAI 99.5 FM in NY, and is an acclaimed commentator on politics and culture." 

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How One Teen Used Twitter To Make A Big Difference At Her School

How One Teen Used Twitter To Make A Big Difference At Her School | Safe Schools & Communities | Scoop.it

"An anonymous Twitter account titled “BCHSAnonymous” has been spreading positivity around Boyle County High School since January. No one knew who was behind it -- until now.

 

During a graduation speech at the Kentucky school this week, senior Taylor Stewart was identified as the serial compliment-giver, according to The Advocate Messenger.

 

“This year, there has been a senior student walking the halls of BCHS who has really made a difference and most definitely left a trail. This young lady is a great leader, a great student and an even better person, who has veiled herself as the infamous BCHS Anonymous, tweeting uplifting thoughts about various students throughout the school year,” senior JT Henderson said of Stewart, according to the outlet.

Stewart has reportedly passed on the BCHSAnonymous torch to another student who will be anonymously tweeting positive thoughts from the account next year.

 

"I think if we use our words in the right way there's no telling what we can accomplish," Stewart told KGO-TV."...

 

For full post, click on title above.

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How Can We Improve School Discipline? Osher, Baer, Sprague, & Doyle

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