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Safe Schools & Communities Resources
This collection includes research-based resources for preventing school violence and creating safe schools and communities. For other education collections, please visit http://bit.ly/edpsychtech, http://bit.ly/SEL_Resources, http://bit.ly/new_standards, and http://bit.ly/testing_testing. For events and resources specific to Santa Clara County, please visit: http://www.scoop.it/t/santa-clara-county-resources
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Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) is the nation’s leading organization advancing the development of academic, social and emotional competence for all students. Our mission is to help make evidence-based social and emotional learning an integral part of education from preschool through high school. Through research, practice and policy, CASEL collaborates to ensure all students become knowledgeable, responsible, caring and contributing members of society."


http://www.casel.org


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:36 AM

These are goals parents, communities and educators at all levels should strive to acheive. 

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Restorative Practices: The Basics and Beyond // Public Counsel // Webinar January 15th, 10am-Noon PST

Restorative Practices: The Basics and Beyond // Public Counsel // Webinar January 15th, 10am-Noon PST | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Restorative Practices, sometimes referred to as Restorative Justice, can develop stronger schools, strengthen teacher-student relationships, support student learning, and resolve conflicts in a way that builds a better school community. 

Restorative Practices: The Basics and Beyond will answer your questions about how restorative justice works in schools and classrooms when there are other competing priorities and about the best ways to implement restorative justice with fidelity. 

 

Join David Yusem, Restorative Justice Program Manager at Oakland Unified School District and Tyrone Botelho, Restorative Justice expert, on Thursday, January 15, from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

 

for Restorative Practices: The Basics and Beyond, part of the Let's Fix School Discipline webinar series."...

 

For registration link, click on title above or here: 
https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/3998113813021978625

 

For Public Counsel's Fix School Discipline Now website: http://fixschooldiscipline.org

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Yakety Yak: What’s Up With Yik Yak? // Justin Patchin, Cyberbullying Research Center

Yakety Yak: What’s Up With Yik Yak? // Justin Patchin, Cyberbullying Research Center | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

By Justin Patchin

"I first wrote about Yik Yak back in March, when the app took several suburban schools by storm. High school administrators around Chicago were deluged with incidents stemming from inappropriate student use of this app, ranging from bullying to bomb threats. To their credit, the administrators of the app responded quickly and restricted its use in and around most middle and high schools. Of course this didn’t stop persistent and inquisitive teens from using the app in other spaces, but it was a start. Since then, the app has slowly made its way to other parts of the country, including mine.

What is Yik Yak?

For those of you who have yet to encounter Yik Yak, it works like an anonymous, location-based Twitter feed. Posts are called “yaks,” and like Twitter, users are limited in the number of characters that can be posted at any one time (200 for Yik Yak). Anyone can download the app (though users are supposed to be 17+), and, without setting up an account or entering any personal or identifying information whatsoever, can immediately post yaks, and see what others in their general geographic vicinity are “yakking” about. Currently, users can view posts by anyone within 10 miles of their present location, though this distance has changed a couple of times since the app’s launch about a year ago. You can also “peek” in on what is being yakked about in other areas. Viewers are able to rate each yak by “upvoting” or “downvoting” them."...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: 

http://cyberbullying.us/yik-yak-revisited/

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Suicide Prevention Awareness // Know the Signs // SuicideIsPreventable.org

Suicide Prevention Awareness // Know the Signs // SuicideIsPreventable.org | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Know the Signs is a statewide suicide prevention social marketing campaign built on three key messages: Know the signs. Find the words. Reach out. This campaign is intended to educate Californians how to recognize the warning signs of suicide, how to find the words to have a direct conversation with someone in crisis and where to find professional help and resources. You can be a part of this campaign and other statewide suicide prevention efforts by joining theYour Voice Counts online forum at www.yourvoicecounts.org


This campaign is funded through counties by the voter approved Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) (Prop. 63) and administered by the California Mental Health Services Authority (CalMHSA), an organization of county governments working to improve mental health outcomes for individuals, families and communities."... 


For main page, click on title, image above, or here: http://www.suicideispreventable.org/


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The Youth Voice Project

The Youth Voice Project | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
The Youth Voice Project presents results of a large scale study that helps youth define what works in preventing peer mistreatment at school.

 

For main website, click title above or here: http://www.youthvoiceproject.com/

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When Traditional Disciplinary Actions Don’t Work, Restorative Justice Can Bring About the Healing Process

When Traditional Disciplinary Actions Don’t Work, Restorative Justice Can Bring About the Healing Process | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

Friday, November 7, Thomas MacMillan, Nation Swell

 

"Professor Carolyn Boyes-Watson remembers getting a call from distressed administrators at a Boston high school: “We have so many girls fighting,” they said, “we’re picking up clumps of hair in the hallways.”


Students were yanking each other’s hair out while brawling in the school’s corridors and cafeteria, and administrators couldn’t figure out how to make the violence stop.


So they called in Boyes-Watson, a sociology professor at Suffolk University in Boston, to train students and teachers in a conflict-resolution practice known as restorative justice. Drawing from Native American traditions, the concept uses ritualized dialogue to try to mend broken communities. Participants gather in circles to try to resolve problems through discussion, rather than retribution.
Across the country, more and more schools are turning to restorative justice as they realize that traditional disciplinary measures — suspensions and expulsions — often don’t deter misbehavior, but can instead set troubled students up for failure by further disengaging them from school.


While traditional justice systems are based on punishing perpetrators (usually by ostracizing or isolating them), restorative justice focuses on healing the harm that has been inflicted — personally and community-wide. Restorative justice programs in schools seek to establish cultures of openness, communication and respect.
Boyes-Watson helped the Boston school set up a practice in which groups of students and teachers met regularly to discuss problems while sitting in a circle. “The kids absolutely take to the circle immediately,” Boyes-Watson says. “They treat each other better. They’re kinder to one another. They feel a sense of belonging and connection. It’s really quite simple. … It’s a small intervention that makes such a powerful difference.”


The effect was transformative. By the following year, the school had solved the problem of girls fighting — no more brawls in the halls.

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.dignityinschools.org/news/when-traditional-disciplinary-actions-don%E2%80%99t-work-restorative-justice-can-bring-about-healing-pr

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California 3 Rs Project // Rights, Responsibility, Respect

California 3 Rs Project // Rights, Responsibility, Respect | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"The California Three Rs Project is partly based on ideas in Finding Common Ground by Charles C. Haynes and Oliver Thomas, a First Amendment guide to religion and public education published by the First Amendment Center. This document outlines the Rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, and the Responsibility that citizens have to protect and defend the rights of all Americans [even those with whom they disagree], and the Respect that is necessary to maintain civil discourse about issues when people disagree because of deeply held beliefs."

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://ca3rsproject.org/

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"Disproportionate Discipline: Addressing Implicit Racial Bias in Suspensions" - Webinar // Fix School Discipline Now

"Disproportionate Discipline: Addressing Implicit Racial Bias in Suspensions" focuses on how unconscious biases affect everyone and how they can factor into school decisions about student discipline. This webinar covers tools and strategies that are effective for combating disciplinary practices that disparately affect students of color. This is the 4th webinar in our Fix School Discipline series. You can see all the past webinars at our Youtube page or click here to read summaries at FixSchoolDiscipline.org: http://www.fixschooldiscipline.org/toolkit/webinar-archive/

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Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services // SAMHSA

Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services // SAMHSA | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
Assists behavioral health professionals in understanding the impact and consequences for those who experience trauma. Discusses patient assessment, treatment planning strategies that support recovery, and building a trauma-informed care workforce.


For main website, click on title above or here: http://store.samhsa.gov/product/TIP-57-Trauma-Informed-Care-in-Behavioral-Health-Services/Most-Popular/SMA14-4816?sortBy=4 

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Lincoln High School Tries New Approach to School Discipline -- Suspensions Drop 85%

Lincoln High School Tries New Approach to School Discipline -- Suspensions Drop 85% | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

The first time that principal Jim Sporleder tried the New Approach to Student Discipline at Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, he was blown away. Because it worked. In fact, it worked so well ...

 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://acestoohigh.com/2012/04/23/lincoln-high-school-in-walla-walla-wa-tries-new-approach-to-school-discipline-expulsions-drop-85/

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Safe School Ambassadors Program (SSA) // Community Matters

Safe School Ambassadors Program (SSA) // Community Matters | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"The key to having safer schools - as well as increasing attendance, achievement and graduation rates - is by adopting and implementing an Inside-out Approach, one that focuses on:
* Strengthening the relationships among the youth and adults
* Viewing students as resources and contributors
* Utilizing restorative justice practices and policies
* Changing the social norms that allow bullying to occur."...
 

http://community-matters.org/

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Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence // http://ei.yale.edu

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence // http://ei.yale.edu | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Emotions drive learning, decision-making, creativity, relationships, and health. The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence uses the power of emotions to create a more effective and compassionate society. The Center conducts research and teaches people of all ages how to develop their emotional intelligence."

 http://ei.yale.edu/

 

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Teachable Moments // Welcoming Schools

Teachable Moments // Welcoming Schools | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Teachable moments are opportunities to move one step closer to creating welcoming schools for all children and families.  Imagine scenarios like these: 

  • A student walks by your classroom and says, “That’s so gay!” to her friends.
  • You overhear one student say to another, “How can he be your"...


For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://www.welcomingschools.org/pages/teachable-moments/ 
 

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Groundspark // Respect for All Project Institute Training // Oakland, CA Feb. 6th & 7th, 2015

Groundspark // Respect for All Project Institute Training // Oakland, CA Feb. 6th & 7th, 2015 | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"For the first time ever, GroundSpark is hosting a Bay Area two-day Respect for All Project Institute (tentative dates Feb 6 & 7, 2015) to provide professional development in creating inclusive, safe schools and communities for young people of all identities and cultures.

Join us for this rare opportunity for a low-cost, in-depth training program–providing tools, curriculum, personal growth and action planning opportunities for professionals working with students in grades K–12.


Register: Please fill out this online form.

Visit our website to learn more about attending a Respect for All Project Institute, and read more about what happened at a previous RFAP Institute."


For more information, click on title above or here: 
http://groundspark.org/rfap-institute-training-nov-8  

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Teenagers to See Counselor, Not Judge, for Minor Crimes // NY Times

Teenagers to See Counselor, Not Judge, for Minor Crimes // NY Times | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

By James C. McKinley, Jr.

"Teenagers arrested for minor crimes will soon be diverted to counseling before they ever come before a judge under a new pilot program in Brooklyn and Manhattan, prosecutors said on Tuesday.

 

The program will apply to 16- and 17-year-olds arrested for the first time for low-level offenses, like jumping a subway turnstile, shoplifting or trespassing, the Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., said.

Those defendants will be offered a deal: Enter a counseling program run by the Center for Court Innovation and the charges will be dropped before arraignment, Mr. Vance said, speaking at a Crain’s New York Business breakfast forum.

 

Mr. Vance said a young person who had done nothing more serious than fail to pay a subway fare should not receive “a trip downtown and a docket number, but a real intervention in his life, to put him on a positive path forward.”

 

For full post, click on title above or here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/14/nyregion/teenagers-to-see-counselor-not-judge-for-minor-crimes.html

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Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit // Common Sense Media

Standing Up, Not Standing By: Cyberbullying Toolkit // Common Sense Media | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Every day, you see how cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? What can you do today that will help your students avoid this pitfall of our digital world?
We created this free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against cyberbullying. So start here. Use it now. Rely on it to start your year off right." Common Sense Media


http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/cyberbullying-toolkit

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From 'At-Risk' to 'At-Promise': Supporting Teens to Overcome Adversity: Dr. Victor Rios at TEDxUCSB

"Dr. Victor Rios- UCSB Professor of Sociology

Professor Rios' 2011 book, Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys (NYU Press), analyzes how juvenile crime policies and criminalization affect the everyday lives of urban youth. He has published on juvenile justice, masculinity, and race and crime in scholarly journals such as The Annals of the Academy of Political and Social Sciences, Latino Studies, and Critical Criminology. In 2011 Professor Rios received the Harold J. Plous award at UCSB and In 2010 he received the Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Mentoring Undergraduate Research."...
 

For video of TEDTalk, view above or here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZ5D_Je8tvo&nbsp

 

For Dr. Rios' website: http://drvictorrios.com/

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SAMHSA's Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach

http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4884/SMA14-4884.pdf

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Where Zero Tolerance Makes Zero Sense

Where Zero Tolerance Makes Zero Sense | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

By Carmel Ferrer -
"The olive branch is universally recognized as a token of peace. In Mississippi's DeSoto County however, Olive Branch's high school embodies zero tolerance at its worst.
 

Dontadrian Bruce, a student at Olive Branch High School, didn't know what to expect when he was summoned to the assistant principal's office on a Monday morning last February. He was surprised when Assistant Principal Todd Nichols pointed to a photo of the 15-year-old posing with his classmates in front of their biology project — a model of the DNA molecule built with Lego blocks — and said, "This is a gang sign. You're a gang banger."
 

In the photo, Dontadrian, intending to represent his number on the school's football team, was holding up his thumb, forefinger and middle finger. That innocent body language, according to Nichols, was sure-fire evidence of affiliation with the Vice Lords, a Chicago-based gang that has a strong presence in Memphis, Tenn., 20 miles northwest of Olive Branch.

 

"I said, 'I'm not in a gang,' but he said, 'Yes, you are. You're a gang banger,'" Dontadrian recalls. Over his vigorous protestations, Dontadrian was suspended for gang activity.

 

His mother, Janet Hightower, was shocked when she got a call telling her to pick up her son. "He'd never been in trouble at school," she says. "He's a good, respectful young man."

 https://www.aclu.org/blog/racial-justice/where-zero-tolerance-makes-zero-sense

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Paper Tigers: A Documentary Film

Paper Tigers: A Documentary Film | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"Paper Tigers captures the pain, the danger, the beauty, and the hopes of struggling teens—and the teachers armed with new science and fresh approaches that are changing their lives for the better." 

 

For documentary trailer, click title above or here: http://papertigersmovie.com 

 

For more on the school featured in this documentary, click here: http://sco.lt/9Egmq9

 

For additional information on trauma-informed approaches, the following links may be of interest: 

 
Basics about "ACEs" (Adverse Childhood Experiences): http://acestoohigh.com/aces-101/

UCSF Hearts Program: http://sco.lt/71NU7l

Trauma Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services: http://sco.lt/7CEn6f

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Bullying of Students with Disabilities Addressed in Guidance to America’s Schools // U.S. Department of Education

Bullying of Students with Disabilities Addressed in Guidance to America’s Schools // U.S. Department of Education | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

October 21st, 2014  

"As part of National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) today issued guidance to schools reminding them that bullying is wrong and must not be tolerated—including against America's 6.5 million students with disabilities.
 

The Department issued guidance in the form of a letter to educators detailing public schools' responsibilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act regarding the bullying of students with disabilities. If a student with a disability is being bullied, federal law requires schools to take immediate and appropriate action to investigate the issue and, as necessary, take steps to stop the bullying and prevent it from recurring.

"While there is broad consensus that bullying cannot be tolerated, the sad reality is that bullying persists in our schools today, especially for students with disabilities," said Catherine E. Lhamon, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. "Basic decency and respect demand that our schools ensure that all their students learn in a safe environment. I look forward to continuing our work with schools to address and reduce incidents of bullying so that no student is limited in his or her ability to participate in and benefit from all that our educational programs have to offer."
 

Since 2009, OCR has received more than 2,000 complaints regarding the bullying of students with disabilities in the nation's public elementary and secondary schools.


Today's guidance builds upon anti-bullying guidance the Department has issued in recent years concerning schools' legal obligations to fix the problem, including:

  • 2013 dear colleague letter and enclosure by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) clarifying that when bullying of a student with a disability results in the student not receiving meaningful educational benefit under IDEA, the school must remedy the problem, regardless of whether the bullying was based on the student's disability.
  • 2010 dear colleague letter by the OCR, which elaborated on potential violations when bullying and harassment is based on race, color, national origin, sex, or disability.
  • 2000 dear colleague letter by the OCR and OSERS, which explained that bullying based on disability may violate civil rights laws enforced by OCR as well as interfere with a student's receipt of special education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).


The latest letter makes clear that the protections for students with disabilities who are bullied on any basis extend to the roughly three quarters of a million students who are not eligible for IDEA services but are entitled to services under the broader Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. That law bars discrimination on the basis of disability in all programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance.
 

Help is available for those who are either targets of disability bullying or know of someone who might be, such as:

  • fact sheet for parents on schools' obligations under federal law to address bullying. The fact sheet is also available in Spanish.
  • Visiting the federal Web site, www.stopbullying.gov, which provides useful information on bullying prevention and remedies.
  • Asking to meet with the student's team that designs his or her individualized education program—the IEP or Section 504 teams.
  • Asking to meet with the principal or school district's special education coordinators to have the school address bullying concerns.
  • Seeking help from OCR. The office investigates complaints of disability discrimination at schools. To learn more about federal civil rights laws or how to file a complaint, contact OCR at 800-421-3481 (TDD: 800-877-8339), or ocr@ed.gov. OCR's Web site is www.ed.gov/ocr. To fill out a complaint form online, go to http://www.ed.gov/ocr/complaintintro.html.

To view OCR's guidance detailing public schools' responsibilities regarding the bullying of students with disabilities in Spanish, click here.


For announcement, click on title above or here: 
http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/bullying-students-disabilities-addressed-guidance-america%E2%80%99s-schools  

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Restorative Justice Project // NCCD

Restorative Justice Project // NCCD | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it
What Is Restorative Justice?
Restorative justice offers alternatives to our traditional juvenile and criminal justice systems and harsh school discipline processes. Rather than focusing on punishment, restorative justice seeks to repair the harm done. At its best, through face-to-face dialogue, restorative justice results in consensus-based plans that meet victim-identified needs in the wake of a crime. This can take many forms, most notably conferencing models, victim-offender dialogue, and circle processes. In applications with youth, it can prevent both contact with the juvenile justice system and school expulsions and suspensions. Restorative justice also holds the potential for victims and their families to have a direct voice in determining just outcomes, and reestablishes the role of the community in supporting all parties affected by crime. Several restorative models have been shown to reduce recidivism and, when embraced as a larger-scale solution to wrongdoing, can minimize the social and fiscal costs of crime."

... "Today, NCCD is leading efforts to institutionalize this and other restorative justice alternatives to juvenile and adult incarceration and zero-tolerance school discipline policies across California and the nation. For more information about restorative justice at NCCD, please contact Nuri Nusrat, Program Associate, Restorative Justice Project.


To learn more about restorative justice projects at NCCD, click here.

Watch sujatha baliga talk about restorative justice by clicking here and listen to her NPR interview here.
 

For full post, click on title or here:
http://nccdglobal.org/what-we-do/major-projects/restorative-justice-project  

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Giving Boys A Bigger Emotional Toolbox // All Things Considered NPR

Giving Boys A Bigger Emotional Toolbox // All Things Considered NPR | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

Eric Westervelt, NPR
"This story is part of the 
"Men In America" series on All Things Considered.

Is America's dominant "man up" ethos a hypermasculine cultural construct, a tenet rooted in biological gender difference or something in between?


Educator Ashanti Branch doesn't much care or, more accurately, doesn't have time to care.


He's too busy trying to make a difference in boys' lives.

Boys in American public schools are suspended from and drop out of school at higher rates than girls. Black and Latino boys are suspended the most. Boys make up half of the student population in American public schools. But among those who are suspended multiple times and expelled, 75 percent are boys.


Branch, now an assistant principal at Montera Middle School in Oakland, Calif., is working to change that. When he first became a teacher about a decade ago at a high school in the San Francisco Bay Area, Branch soon realized he had a problem with the boys: Nearly half of all black and Latino boys were failing his math class, and almost half were failing all their classes.


"That was not OK for me," he says. "I was not willing to sit back and watch that happen."


So in 2004, at San Lorenzo High School on the east side of San Francisco Bay, he founded the Ever Forward Club for boys.

"When I started it I told these young men, 'I'm gonna bribe you. I'm gonna buy you lunch once a week and you're basically gonna teach me how to be a better teacher.' "


He came to school early and stayed late. And he always tried to have something in his room for kids to snack on. He created a safe place where boys can talk with him and each other, play, hang out and do their homework without fear of being seen as weak or uncool. This year Branch started a new boys Ever Forward Club at Montera Middle School in Oakland.


A Bigger Tool Box

Branch tries to foster emotional maturity through conversation, play and community. The big goal is to help give boys a bigger emotional tool box to better handle the challenges of school and life now and into the future.


"The pain that they're holding on to that they don't really have a space to [let] go, the anger, the sadness — all those things. How can I help them tap into that in ways that they can let it go and not walk around angry all the time? I told one young man the other day: 'You walk around with a tool box full of hammers. You hammer everything. All you needed was a little screwdriver.' "...


For full post, click on title above or here: http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/06/25/325464770/giving-boys-a-bigger-emotional-tool-box 


Click here to view EverForward IndieGoGo Video

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UCSF HEARTS Program: Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools // UCSF

UCSF HEARTS Program: Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools // UCSF | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"The UCSF Healthy Environments and Response to Trauma in Schools (HEARTS) project is a comprehensive, multilevel school-based prevention and intervention program for children who have experienced trauma. The goal of UCSF HEARTS is to create school environments that are more trauma-sensitive and supportive of the needs of traumatized children. A main objective of this project is to work collaboratively with SFUSD to promote school success by decreasing trauma-related difficulties and increasing healthy functioning in students within the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) who have experienced complex trauma. Trauma-sensitive school environments will likely benefit not only traumatized children, but also those who are affected by these children, including child peers and school personnel."

For main website, click on title above or here: http://coe.ucsf.edu/coe/spotlight/ucsf_hearts.html

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SAMSHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

SAMSHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices | Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Scoop.it

"NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than 200 interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment. We connect members of the public to intervention developers so they can learn how to implement these approaches in their communities. NREPP is not an exhaustive list of interventions, and inclusion in the registry does not constitute an endorsement."

 

http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/

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