"Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel)
39 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - Heavy Turboprop Captain (Former RAF C130J Captain) - Quest 3 Project

Simon - Heavy Turboprop Captain (Former RAF C130J Captain) - Quest 3 Project | "Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel) | Scoop.it

Simon is a work colleague and friend of mine and is currently employed in Australia as a heavy (> 5,700kgs) turboprop captain in a charter operation. He was previously employed in the RAF as a C130J Hercules Captain and was also a Tactics Instructor, training military crew for flight in dangerous/hazardous environments.

 

Many OH&S hazards exist in both his flying roles, more-so in his previous role, for this analysis I will examine his current employment, touching on his previous background.

Matt Day's insight:

Many OH&S hazards and issues are faced by Simon whilst flying day-to-day. the issues identified by Simon being potentially hazardous are related to Fatigue, Adverse Weather, Support at Out-Ports & technical breakdowns. I will be covering these areas off in the following insight.

 

The company Simon is employed operate its aircraft nearly 24 hours a day in a Multi-Role Environment. During the day most of the aircraft are used for Passenger Transport mainly in support of FIFO operations but at night, the company has specially configured freighter aircraft to operate on behalf of a major Australian airline up the east coast of Queensland and on occasions to Adelaide and Sydney, this shift usually starts for the pilots at around 1am and will go through to 5-6am, even tough the shift is 5 hours long it occurs during the body's circadian low (natural rest period). It is extremely paramount when flying in night operations followed by passenger day operations that you are well rested prior to and also rested after duty with useful sleep periods (this is in line with the company's FRMS or Fatigue Risk Management System).

 

Many advanced aircraft are capable of flying through adverse weather, however certain conditions or scenarios in regards to weather conditions are best to be avoided altogether, but this is not always possible. Two conditions which will severely degrade the safety margins of flight are Severe Turbulence and Severe Icing, if not handled correctly Severe Turbulence can cause major structural damage and jeopardising the operation of the aircraft. No aircraft is certified for flight into known or forecast Severe Icing Conditions and flight in these conditions can degrade aircraft performance severely.

 

On occasions Simon will fly the aircraft to an airport which has no suitable facilities or support available to use (such as ground handlers and Marshallers), this is a hazard to the safe operation on the ground as Simon has to be extra careful to ensure wingtip clearance from obstacles and also perform ground handling duties such as refueling, baggage handling and check-in for passengers.

 

Technical breakdowns in flight or on the ground are an inevitable aspect of aircraft operations, most of them are small, insignificant and can easily be resolved. The small few present an issue depending on the circumstances. Air Crew train and are tested on a regular basis to ensure the risk of these occurrences are mitigated. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - CAAP SMS3-1 (Civil Aviation Advisory Publication) Non‐Technical Skills Training an Assessment for Regular Publi Transport Operations

Matt Day's insight:

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority has  recommended that all pilots employed in Regular Public Transport operations (Qantas, Virgin, etc) complete a Non-Technical Skills Course every year. Non-technical Skills is training which facilitates the principles behind crew resource management and flight deck interaction between crew members. Whilst this is only a recommendation, most airlines are already adopting this approach to risk management or are about to begin.

 

As Simon operates in a charted environment they are exempt from this recommendation, however his employer believes that the value of this risk management system far outweighs the cost and it allows them to run a safer operation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - CASR (Civil Aviation Safety Regulations) Part 92.A-01(0)

Matt Day's insight:

On occasions, Simon is tasked to operate a freighter on behalf of a Large Australian Airline. Whilst carrying freight safety is of utmost importance. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority makes it mandatory for all flight crew to be current and certified for the carriage of dangerous goods by air.

 

The  dangerous goods manual incorporates a risk management system which includes an initial and recurrent training program to allow crews to handle dangerous good carefully either handling on the ground or whilst in flight thus assisting Simon to prevent a dangerous good safety related incident from occurring.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Adam - Aircraft Technician (Engines & Air-frames) RAAF

Adam - Aircraft Technician (Engines & Air-frames) RAAF | "Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel) | Scoop.it

This is my brother Adam and he is a Aircraft Technician specialising in Engines and Air-frames for the RAAF, he has been in this role for over 10 years on multiple aircraft types and at times is supervising a team of up to 30 plus Defence personnel in Australia and on Deployment overseas. In the top photo is inspects the rear of an No. 36 Squadron C-17 Globemaster engine, at the Italian Military Air Base Pierozzi, in Brindisi. In the bottom photo (right hand seated) he is watching as the last of the UN supplies are being loaded for distribution in South Sudan. 

 

Adam's job is quite fast paced and unique taking him to many corners of the world at very short notice, this presents a range of hazards which I will discuss in depth as part of this Quest.

Matt Day's insight:

After talking with Adam he has identified many OH&S (WH&S) issues that occur in his day-to-day work environment. Some of these issues are; Working with various dangerous fluids, chemicals & gases, Exposure to extreme changes in pressure and noise, & also short notice for domestic and overseas deployments to on occasion hostile environments.

 

On a daily basis, Adam will come in contact with various dangerous jet oils and lubricants such as hydraulic fluid (both of which contain known carcinogens), Jet Fuel, Diesel Fuel and also Liquid Oxygen. if treated poorly these chemicals can have catastrophic effects on the human body. Personal Protective Equipment required for the job task is listed and it's use enforced for all operations involving hazardous chemicals and and work in hazardous environments.

 

One aspect of Adam's job post maintenance is to run the aircraft's 4 engines to ensure their correct operation, this procedure depending on the task can expose Adam to intense peaks in external Noise and Vibration. On occasion Adam is also responsible for ensuring correct operation of the aircraft's pressurisation system, this procedure can expose Adam to extreme pressure changes on his body akin to the aircraft encountering rapid de-compression.

 

Adam often travels away from home on short notice and works in unusual environments which all present their own OH&S issues some are in extreme high heat and humidity environments such as Papua new Guinea to extreme cold icy conditions of Switzerland. Adam is also deployed at times to hostile environments which present safety issues. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Chris - Joint Battlefield Airspace Controller (Military & Civil Air Traffic Controller) - RAAF

Chris - Joint Battlefield Airspace Controller (Military & Civil Air Traffic Controller) - RAAF | "Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel) | Scoop.it

A friend of mine Chris (pictured top with the binoculars) is a Joint Battlefield Airspace Controller, this can best be described as similar to a civilian air traffic controller but with much higher workload. This is due to not only controlling and separating civilian aircraft through military airspace but also separating those aircraft from  other military aircraft, such as supersonic fighter type aircraft which at times can be operating at low level and in formation. He is qualified to conduct his duties on Tower, Radar (Approach & Departures) and also Surface Movement. he says he spends 99% of his time now instructing new controllers in a Radar Environment (Dark Isolated room with Computer Consoles).

 

Many hazards and OH&S issues are present in Chris's employment and I will providing my insight on a few of them here.

Matt Day's insight:

Chris has identified many strong OH&S issues that are applicable to his role and also methods that are required or that he uses to try and reduce the problems these issues may cause. Such items include; Poor workstation ergonomics, Mental Fatigue, Lighting and Noise.

 

Where Chris spends the majority of his time is the Radar Room, this room has desks whereby the monitor and console controls are not well ergonomically designed (1980's). These consoles require a low seating position with a raised screen, this can cause neck and eye strain for some controllers. Chris has available to him a variety of chairs, and he selects the one that is most comfortable to him. the current system is also due to be replaced in the coming years.

 

At anyone time Chris can be responsible for multiple aircraft in his airspace with total passenger numbers closing in on 1000. This ever changing airspace requires quick thinking, fast mental maths and fantastic situational awareness. This constant state of alertness can cause stress and mental fatigue. rules are in place to allow an Air-traffic controller sufficient rest on the job such as, 4 hours maximum at one period controlling, no more than 10 hours per day, no more than 120 hours per 28 days and also they must have 36 hours continuous break in a 7 day period. No shifts are also allowed to begin between the hours of Midnight and 5:00am (Period of Circadian low)

 

The Radar Room is lit, however it can be considered to be a low light environment with no external light. With the screen brightness set the lighting environment can cause headaches in some people which present an OH&S issue to an already potentially stressful environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - Flight Safety Foundation - CFIT (Controlled Flight Into Terrain) Checklist

Matt Day's insight:

The environments in which Simon flies into require a certain skill set which is acquired through regular training and courses. The clients also require a high level of experience from the crew to ensure the safety of the operation. The flight safety foundation sets the standard on crew experience through their BARS program, which regularly audits the operators to ensure they are operating to the highest safe standard.

 

As part of the BARS accreditation, the Flight Safety Foundation requires all pilots to complete a course regularly on Controlled Flight Into Terrain, this course is designed to reduce the risk to a level which is As Low as reasonably possible through constant education and understanding. The approach by the foundation is certainly a risk management system designed to help operators ensure their crews operate safely.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation) PANS-OPS (Procedures for Air Navigation Services)

Simon - ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation) PANS-OPS (Procedures for Air Navigation Services) | "Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel) | Scoop.it

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is a UN specialized agency, created in 1944 upon the signing of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago Convention).  ICAO works with the Convention’s 191 Signatory States and global industry and aviation organizations to develop international Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) which are then used by States when they develop their legally-binding national civil aviation regulations.  There are currently over 10,000 SARPs reflected in the 19 Annexes to the Chicago Convention which ICAO oversees, and it is through these SARPs and ICAO’s complementary policy, auditing and capacity-building efforts that today’s global air transport network is able to operate over 100,000 daily flights, safely, efficiently and securely in every region of the world.  

Matt Day's insight:

When the weather is good approaching an airport for landing a Pilot can conduct what is known as a visual approach, (Remain Clear or cloud, in sight of ground or water, good visibility, etc) however when the weather is poor and these conditions cannot be met an Instrument approach must be conducted. This allows the aircraft to fly to the runway (or a height above the aerodrome) in order to either conduct an instrument approach or in some cases land the aircraft with very little visual external clues at all.

 

Every Airport and every runway is different however these approaches are all designed using the same method and the same procedures to fly them in an effort to manage the risk and reduce the risk of collision with terrain whilst approaching the airport.

 

ICAO or the International Civil Aviation Organisation was founded post WW2, they are not only responsible for the majority of the Air Law which is in force within Australia and the world today but also their systems are used in Instrument Approach Design.

 

I did not link the Risk Management document into this scoop as the file is too large but it is worth a bit of a read and can be found below.

http://code7700.com/pdfs/icao_doc_8168_vol2.pdf

 

Simon uses approach charts based on this system on a daily basis and an example of one for Brisbane Airport ILS Runway 01 can be found in the below link.

http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/aip/current/dap/BBNII01-139.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Simon - Fatigue Risk Management System (FAID FRMS System)

Matt Day's insight:

Any Air Operator which hires pilots has to choose one of two models in which to abide by when rostering and operating pilots for duty and flight. One is legislation based under the Civil Aviation Orders part 48 (CAO 48) and the other has to be an approved fatigue risk management system (FRMS).

 

Simon's employer has elected to operate under a CASA approved FRMS, this is due to the nature and time of day of the flying which is being conducted. One popular FRMS used in Australia is called the FAID system and is owned by Fatigue Analysis InterDynamics. InterDynamics is an Australian Company who has conducted extensive sleep research over a long period of time, this research was partially conducted at the Appleton Institute in Adelaide which is now a CQU Campus. The FAID system is organic as it calculates not only your past sleep work cycles, it also compares it to your future requirements to produce a fatigue score. the higher the score, the higher likeliness of showing signs of fatigue. Once this number has reached a certain level, the pilot is no longer permitted to fly.

 

This Risk Management System allows Simon to work the required hours whilst ensuring he is well rested between duties and does not become fatigued thus reducing the likeness of a fatigue related incident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

"Safety Starts Before Take-Off" - My Methodology. - Quest 2

For Quest 2 in OCHS11026 I have decided to Pick 5 family members, friends and colleagues to base my "Scoop's" on. Even though all these personnel are working in the Aviation Industry and are pivitol to the safe operation of aircraft in Australian Skies the OH&S issues that they face or have faced are all very different.

 

For this Quest I have elected to write about the following roles:

Turboprop Captain, Aircraft Engineer, Joint Battlefield Airspace Controller (ATC), Senior Flight Attendant & Air Ambulance Pilot.

  

Note: All Civilian Photos are approved by the owner of the photograph and all Defence Force Photos (which are of the actual people) are in the public domain and published by the DOD Media Unit or 1st Public Affairs Unit.

 

The Scoop.it profile photo is of my beautiful wife and I preparing to go for a casual Sunday flight from Townsville Airport around the islands in a Cessna 172SP.  

Matt Day's insight:

I talked to all my people about what OH&S based issues that they faced in a day to day environment and also what countermeasures are available to them or they have personally put in place to try and mitigate the risk that these issues may impose personally.

 

I have included insight for each in regards to our discussions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Matt Day
Scoop.it!

Jess - Senior Flight Attendant

Jess - Senior Flight Attendant | "Safety Starts Before Take-Off" (An Analysis of Key Aviation Personnel) | Scoop.it

Jess is another work colleague of mine and is a senior flight attendant, she is responsible for preparing the main cabin for flight whilst also keeping it safe and comfortable assisting wherever she can.

 

Before each flight she ensures all the required supplies are on board, the multitude of complex emergency and safety supplies are operational and stowed in their correct locations. she assists with boarding and conducts all the regulatory safety briefings. during flight she assists passengers and crew wherever possible, after each flight she will clean the cabin and present it for another flight or organise for the cabin to be terminated if the aircraft is no longer operating that day.

 

Jess and the other flight crew are also required to train regularly for any emergency scenario which may occur either on the ground or in flight.  

Matt Day's insight:

Some parts of the Aircraft Jess find's home can be quite small and cramped at times, on occasion especially in light turbulence she will bump or hit herself on part of the aircraft internal structure, depending on the severity this can cause personal injury, if it does Jess will process an SMS report through the appropriate means.

 

Being in an aircraft cabin which is situated close to propeller's, Jess is exposed to high noise levels for prolonged periods of time. The company has a reimbursement scheme which allows flight attendants to purchase special personalised noise reduction earplugs thus reducing the effects the prolonged exposure can cause.

 

The environment Jess work's in is very dry with low relative humidity, this at times causes issues with dry skin and hair thus requiring regular moisturiser which enables her skin to re-hydrate.

 

When working on the ground with no aircraft power, the aircraft cabin temperature can rise dramatically especially in summer. To ensure she does not get de-hydrated Jess consumes water regularly. Also in the warmer states such as QLD the flight attendant uniform standards change and allow Jess to not wear coats or scarfs when they are not suitable for warmer conditions.

more...
No comment yet.