Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes
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Making Cultural Connections: Connecting Experiences Across Cultures- OBJECTIVE:

OBJECTIVE:

Students will research background information for Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes in order to explain and support predictions about the novella's historical, cultural and social contexts.

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BrainPOP | Social Studies | Learn about World War II Causes

BrainPOP | Social Studies | Learn about World War II Causes | Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes | Scoop.it
In this educational animated movie about Social Studies learn about Hitler, fascists, Chamberlain, Appeasement, Mussolini, Axis, Japan, Italy, reparations, Nazis, War, and FDR.
Patricia Engel-Bunch's insight:

Please go through the network while in school...www.bcps.org <students < resources< BrainPop!

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Little Boy and Fat Man

From Baltimore County Public Schools' 6th grade reading curriculum.

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                      "Little Boy" is the nickname given to the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. It was Monday morning. Little Boy was dropped from the Enola Gay, one of the B-29 bombers that flew over Hiroshima on that day.
             After being released, it took about a minute for Little Boy to reach the point of explosion. Little Boy exploded at approximately 8:15 a.m. (Japan Standard Time) when it reached an altitude of 2,000 ft above the building that is today called the "A-Bomb Dome."

The July 24, 1995 issue of Newsweek writes:
"A bright light filled the plane," wrote Lt. Col. Paul Tibbets, the pilot of the Enola Gay, the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb. "We turned back to look at Hiroshima. The city was hidden by that awful cloud...boiling up, mushrooming." For a moment, no one spoke. Then everyone was talking. "Look at that! Look at that! Look at that!" exclaimed the co-pilot, Robert Lewis, pounding on Tibbets's shoulder. Lewis said he could taste atomic fission; it tasted like lead. Then he turned away to write in his journal. "My God," he asked himself, "what have we done?" (special report, "Hiroshima: August 6, 1945")
note: Paul Tibbets was Colonel, not "Lt. Colonel," when he was the pilot of the Enola Gay.

The Little Boy generated an enormous amount of energy in terms of air pressure and heat. In addition, it generated a significant amount of radiation (Gamma ray and neutrons) that subsequently caused devastating human injuries.
            The people who saw the Little Boy often say "We saw another sun in the sky when it exploded." The heat and the light generated by the Little Boy were far stronger than bombs which they had seen before. When the heat wave reached ground level it burnt all before it including people.
            The strong wind generated by the bomb destroyed most of the houses and buildings within a 1.5-mile radius. When the wind reached the mountains, it was reflected and again hit the people in the city center. The wind generated by Little Boy caused the most serious damage to the city and people. 
            The radiation generated by the bomb caused long-term problems to those affected. Many people died within the first few months and many more in subsequent years because of radiation exposure. Some people had genetic problems which sometimes resulted in having malformed babies or being unable to have children.
            It is believed that more than 140,000 people died by the end of the year. They were citizens including students, soldiers, and Koreans who worked in factories within the city. The total number of people who have died due to the bomb is estimated to be 200,000.

Just three days after the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, the second atomic bomb called "Fat Man" was dropped on Nagasaki. Though the amount of energy generated by the bomb dropped on Nagasaki was significantly larger than that of the Little Boy, the damage done to the city was slighter than that done to Hiroshima due to the geographic structure of the city. It is estimated that approximately 70,000 people died by the end of the year because of the bombing.

 

**BCPS Curriculum

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BrainPOP | Social Studies | Learn about World War II

BrainPOP | Social Studies | Learn about World War II | Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes | Scoop.it
A BrainPOP movie about World War II. Learn about Hitler, Nazis, what a Blitzkrieg is, and when America entered the war. Oh, and remember: Don't invade Russia in the winter!
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Kids Web Japan

Kids Web Japan | Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes | Scoop.it
Kids Web Japan provides fun content that helps children learn about Japan. The site is widely used in elementary and middle school classrooms around the world. Parts of the site are available in French, German, Spanish, Korean, Chinese, and Arabic.
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Safari Montage: Hiroshima, Japan- 12 minutes

Patricia Engel-Bunch's insight:

Use your bcps profile to log into SAFARI MONTAGE. Go through the network if you are in school. 

The city of Hiroshima, a global symbol of the horrors of war and the hope for peace, was founded in the 16th century by a feudal lord and became a military center in 1868. On August 6, 1945 most of the city was destroyed by an atomic bomb dropped by the United States. Approximately 70,000 people were killed at the moment and immediate aftermath of the catastrophic blast, and radiation sickness killed many more in the post-war era. Hiroshima began reconstruction in 1950 and is now a large industrial city. Peace Memorial Park is located at the epicenter of the atomic blast and contains memorials dedicated to those killed by the explosion. Millions of paper cranes, symbolizing longevity and peace, surround the Children's Peace Memorial throughout the year. Located near the park is the Atomic Bomb Dome, one of the few buildings not completely destroyed at the end of World War II.

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The Effects of the Atomic Bomb

From Baltimore County Public Schools' 6th grade reading curriculum.

Patricia Engel-Bunch's insight:

 

The atomic bomb used in Hiroshima was a powerful and dangerous weapon. The atomic bomb that exploded 580 meters above Hiroshima was powered by the splitting of 855 grams of uranium. The energy released was equivalent to 15,000 tons of TNT (dynamite).
The bomb created a high-temperature, high-pressure, fireball which grew to a diameter of approximately 1312 feet one second after explosion. The fireball emitted intense thermal rays for up to three seconds and continued to glow for approximately ten seconds. The shock wave at the leading edge of the blast traveled 6.8 miles in 30 seconds. The initial shock wave was followed by winds blowing at up to 1408 feet per second.

The super-hot fireball (several million degrees Celsius in the center) emitted ultraviolet rays and visible light radiation. The temperature on the ground near the center reached three to four thousand degrees Celsius.
         Initial radiation was heaviest within 1.2 miles of the hypocenter. Initial radiation may have been the primary cause of death for at least half of those exposed outdoors within a half a mile of the hypocenter.
Black fallout ashes ("ashes of death") from fission fragments were produced when the uranium atoms were split. Large amounts of radioactive material fell with the black ash.

The damage done to human bodies by radiation has been referred to generally as A-bomb disease.  Some people exposed to the radiation suffered acute damage right away. Acute damage refers to symptoms that appeared within four months of the bombing (by the end of December, 1945). In addition to burns and external injuries, common symptoms of radiation exposure included hair loss, bleeding, and lowered levels of white blood cells.
        Some people, however, did not experience the effects of radiation until much later. Later radiation produced high rates of cataracts, leukemia, and various cancers (thyroid, breast, lung, etc.). It also produced high rates of birth defects. Some victims who entered the city after the bombing became sick or died from what is believed to be exposure to residual radiation.

 

http://cla.calpoly.edu/~lcall/bombdata.html

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World Book

The World Book web site offers an encyclopedia, dictionary, atlas, homework help, study aids, and curriculum guides. World Book is publisher of the World Book Encyclopedia.
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Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes - Student Resources

Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes - Student Resources | Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes | Scoop.it
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Extra resources.

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