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The 10 Best Sources of Free, Beautiful Images for your Business

The 10 Best Sources of Free, Beautiful Images for your Business | start-up | Scoop.it
We can find thousands of beautiful images on the web. However, we have very hard time finding images we can use. Here are the finest sources of such images.

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Cidio Halperin's insight:

util para postagens

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Andreas Hebbel-Seeger's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:59 AM

Always useful even for presentations

Marcus Brailsford's curator insight, September 29, 2015 9:50 AM
Images are a key ingredient to making a piece of print stand out! Make sure you go for quality images used correctly.
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21 Metrics For Monitoring SEO Health

21 Metrics For Monitoring SEO Health | start-up | Scoop.it

An SEO issue that goes unnoticed, even for a few days, can have a huge impact on business -- so what metrics can you use to detect problems early?


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Clicks That Count – An Infographic for Hospital Marketers

Clicks That Count – An Infographic for Hospital Marketers | start-up | Scoop.it

Investing money in your hospital’s website can drive traffic online and to your door. Primacy analyzed the traffic and paid search activity of five hospitals during 2012 to see if any patterns emerged. It turns out some did. Take a look at the infographic below to see which clicks matter the most.


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Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke infographic

Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke infographic | start-up | Scoop.it

Important progress has been made, but more is needed to continue to save lives, particulalry for people under 65 yeras.  Black men are at the highest risk of dying early fromheart disease and stroke.  Counties in Southern states have the greratest risk overall.


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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, November 1, 2013 10:01 AM

Nearly 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke.  Most of the major risk factors can be manged or prevented: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and obesity.

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Infographic: Heart attack to-do list | Articles | Public Relations

Infographic: Heart attack to-do list | Articles | Public Relations | start-up | Scoop.it
Of all those lists you make, we bet you never created one like this. More than all the rest, it may save your life.

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Cheerfulness Makes For Healthier Heart, Cardiologists Say

Cheerfulness Makes For Healthier Heart, Cardiologists Say | start-up | Scoop.it
Having a positive outlook and a general sense of well-being is linked to reduction in coronary events such as heart attack and sudden cardiac death.

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Reflecting on the development of E-Health and participatory medicine

Reflecting on the development of E-Health and participatory medicine | start-up | Scoop.it

There has been a quiet but steady movement in the healthcare industry for about 10 years or so now, which is only going to continue to grow and expand. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act, it is absolutely the wave of the future in Western healthcare and medicine, in my view. 

 

It’s called e-health, and it means what the term implies: healthcare practice supported by electronic processes and communication. Whether we like it or not, technology, the Internet, and social media are here to stay. It is, without question, the functional foundation of our entire society, and our healthcare system is certainly no different.


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rob halkes's curator insight, November 8, 2013 5:54 AM

Ehealth, participatory health and .. integrated care: a long way to go still. Here's a cry out for a specific case..

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3 Tough Lessons From A Startup's First Year

3 Tough Lessons From A Startup's First Year | start-up | Scoop.it

If you simply talked about startup achievements, then we would be overlooking the most important part of starting a business: learning from failure.

 

Here are our top three mistakes, resulting implications and corresponding lessons learned from this past year.


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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:00 AM

The first year for a startup is essential: success or failure. Adapt, learn, respond, every day brings its battles. Here is a good article to illustrate this, very worthwhile reading for every entrepreneur.

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Apple iPhone among most important digital cameras

Apple iPhone among most important digital cameras | start-up | Scoop.it
PopPhoto recently compiled a list detailing the 30 most important digital cameras of all time. Not surprisingly, and quite deservedly, Apple's original iPhone made the cut.

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16 Reasons Why People Leave Your Website

16 Reasons Why People Leave Your Website | start-up | Scoop.it

Are you getting traffic to your website, but very few of those visitors are converting into leads and customers? You might be making one of these mistakes on your website. Here are 16 reasons people leave your site without buying.


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Carline HUSLIN's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:46 PM

La puissance de la recommandation même sur les sites web

Mike Allen's curator insight, May 30, 2015 8:42 AM

The decision may seem logical but in reality many are emotional unless your content is irrelevent

Harmony Com's curator insight, June 4, 2015 4:01 AM

Des erreurs très fréquentes sur les sites des TPE.

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Top Trends in Social Medical Marketing

Top Trends in Social Medical Marketing | start-up | Scoop.it

Wrangling in new patients is difficult in areas with competitive healthcare. This is especially true for specialty clinics and small hospitals that are dwarfed by large hospitals, though there are strategies via social medical marketing that can help boost your local exposure.

As everyone knows, having a strong online presence is a necessity for every industry. Marketing teams over the last few years have researched and developed strategies for generating likes, shares, followers, and other Web disciples to no avail, largely because theInternet is always changing. Simply put, every online strategy needs to be unique based on a business’ personality. As a healthcare specialist, you need to find ways to ensure your online followers know that you are an authority in your field and a practice they can trust.

Building up a reputation as an expert with social medical marketing is easy with the right approach. Firstly, you need to develop a strong social media presence by securing accounts on LinkedIn, Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and any other platform you think will help. Not only do these allow you to share information and stay in touch with patients, you are also taking control of your practice’s (your brand’s) name. Even if you decide to leave one account alone because you’re not seeing results, you can always go back to it later.

Next, you need to fill your profiles full of information that makes it easy for patients to find out who you are, what you do, and where your practice is located. This links back to branding basics; you need to develop a marketing platform, brand imagery, and messaging that relays info back to your patients that is easy to understand. Stay consistent throughout your profiles, too, in order to reduce any confusion.

Incentivizing Social Media
Having media accounts is useless without followers. Few patients have a reason to follow their doctor on Facebook — it’s up to you to convince them otherwise. Start by asking patients to like your pages and profiles (put your info on a business card, perhaps?) and even incentivize the process with deals. Or, if you’re really into making a splash in the online community, send patients information via social media about upcoming appointments and health information they may find informative. The same idea applies to emailed newsletters, text message appointment times, and other reminders.

Visualizations
Marketers have found that people react better to bright, attractive imagery rather than boring blocks of Web text. When you’re making posts or publishing blogs on social media, accompany them with multimedia like videos, infographics, and images. People are more likely to halt their newsfeed scrolling if they come across something that pops off the page. Think visual when you start out on your campaign and find pictures and graphs that accurately reflect your information.

Website Linking
Websites are like secondary storefronts for modern businesses. In terms of social medical marketing, link to and from your website with your social profiles and keep it stocked full of new, original, and accurate information about your practice and the healthcare industry. As mentioned, the best marketing campaigns set you up as a professional authority in a field. Writing pamphlets, articles, and blogs can help support this idea — all you have to do is link them through to your website.

Enlisting the Masses
It would be impossible for you, a busy doctor or healthcare professional, to do all of this on your own. Instead, enlist help from your staff and other experts. Did you get a new x-ray machine? Call up a radiologist and have them write up a few hundred words that you then publish on your website. Don’t be afraid to try new things, either; sometimes the most successful strategies are the ones no one has ever tried before.

Going Forward
The most important thing to do is to keep at it. Don’t give up if you don’t have every Facebook follower in town; focus instead on the long-term goal of creating an online brand and presence. Healthcare is a difficult, competitive field on the Internet. It is your job, and you should employ social medical marketing in order to support your practice as an authority and to provide patients with information.


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Sedra T.'s curator insight, November 25, 2013 6:10 AM

SMEs should have a strong online presence to stay competitive in online market and, particularly, produce unique and valuable content.

Janet Vasil's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:13 PM

A good read and while I don't agree with every point, they make sense. I work with aesthetic medical professionals who want to create social media buzz with video. 

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Social Media: Does It Really Change Patient Behavior?

Social Media: Does It Really Change Patient Behavior? | start-up | Scoop.it

Thanks to the technologic allure of iPhones replacing stethoscopes,apps substituting for doctors and electronic information substituting for having to actually talk to patients, the thoroughly modern Disease Management Care Blog is all about medical-social media. 

 

Think Facebook for the flu.  Twitter for tinnitus. Egads, listen to the typical consultant, pundit or futurist and it's easy to believe that we're on the verge of a silicon-based health care revolution

But then reality intrudes and some skeptic somewhere always asks about the bang for the buck, the juice for the squeeze, the return for the investment. It's a good question.

 

For something of an answer, consider the results appearing in a recently published randomized clinical trial.  The actual condition in question is going unmentioned for now, so that the DMCB can better focus on the issue of patient engagement

 

Over a 4 month period, “at risk persons” were recruited for a clinical research trial with on-line ads (Facebook banners, Craigslist, for example) as well as announcements in community settings and venues.  Once persons met the usual inclusion criteria and had a unique Facebook account, they were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms.

One treatment arm used a closed Facebook group to coach persons about their at risk condition.  The other treatment arm similarly used Facebook to coach persons about general health improvement.  Lay “Peer Leaders,” who were given a three hour training session on “epidemiology of the condition or general health subjects and ways of using Facebook to discuss health and stigmatizing topics,” were assigned to lead the groups.

 

Peer Leaders attempted to reach out to their assigned group persons with messaging, chats and wall posts.  Once the link was established, the relationship in the intervention group included communication about prevention and treatment of the condition. At the end of 1, 2 and three months of the study, participants completed a variety of surveys.

 

Results?

 

57 individuals were in the control general health group and 55 were in the condition coaching group.  According to the surveys, intervention patients were ultimately statistically significantly more likely to agree to condition testing (44%) than the control patients (20%).  Because there were few participants, the modest decrease in actual tests or risk behaviors were not statistically meaningful.

 

The DMCB's take:

While this was a small study, this is the first time that the DMCB has seen reasonable proof that social media by itself can move the behavior needle.  On the other hand, this did not result in a patient engagement stampede toward better care or hard clinical outcomes.  A majority of participants (56%) did not appear to benefit.  Nonetheless, the results do support the inclusion of Facebook-style closed group social media in the suite of population health management services.

 

That being said, the condition at risk was HIV and study population was men who have sex with men (“MSMs”).  It doesn't necessarily follow that what would work in this community of persons would necessarily be transferrable to other conditions, such as diabetes.  The DMCB doesn't think that's really true and finds it credible that 112 persons with diabetes or hypertension would probably achieve the same kind of results (A1c testing or home blood pressure monitoring) in a similarly tailored Facebook closed group.

 

Here's the study.

 

Let the research continue!

 


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Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients | Medical Economics

Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients | Medical Economics | start-up | Scoop.it
Five heart disease management apps to recommend to patients

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E-patients and their hunt for health information on social media

How patients and caregivers seek health information in the digital age

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James LaCorte's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:39 AM

Great presentation sohwing how patients are using social media as a #HealthCare resource. #SocBiz

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The Final 4 Disrupt Europe Startups: Asap54, Import.io, Lock8 ...

The Final 4 Disrupt Europe Startups: Asap54, Import.io, Lock8 ... | start-up | Scoop.it
It might have been a long time coming, but the first ever TechCrunch Disrupt Europe, held in Berlin, has been a fantastic window into the burgeoning European..
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