Russia
8.9K views | +3 today
 
Scooped by Erin Bouma
onto Russia
Scoop.it!

Svetlana Alexievich’s History of Human Feelings

Svetlana Alexievich’s History of Human Feelings | Russia | Scoop.it

The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Belarusian Svetlana Alexievich. 


Alexievich’s central message is that post-communist countries like Belarus will not become free and democratic if the citizens of these societies cannot free themselves from the destructive Soviet legacy that affects even young people who have never lived under communism. She was recently hosted at Washington, DC’s National Endowment for Democracy at a standing room only lunchtime event; policymakers, academicians, pundits, and media all came to hear the prize-winning author in conversation with Leon Wieseltier, the former longtime literary editor at The New Republic and now a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. 

    Alexievich began by explaining why she has developed a new way of documenting history. “Life is much faster than any event,” she told Wieseltier. “It involves a lot of people, a lot of witnesses and testimonies.” She said that from her earliest memories, she found her childhood home and village “much more interesting than fiction. Journalism is wonderful, but still limiting. It takes only the upper layer of life. I want to delve deeper, to see the truth of human beings.” 

    She slowly realized, “Why not compose a novel using live voices? Every person has a deeper truth. . . I never call what I do ‘interviews.’ We speak to each other as neighbors, in a new genre that is required by our time. It is a history of human feelings.”

    Wieseltier asked Alexievich to expand on what this “history of human feelings” is, and she responded by talking about details that would be “lost in the scheme of grand history, a tremble of the heart that reveals our true humanity.” She then told the story of a woman she spoke with who had been a combatant in World War II. When Alexievich asked her what she had packed to bring to the front, the woman said she brought “a suitcase full of chocolate bonbons.” “These are normal women who had their own humanity,” said Alexievich. “I do not collect catastrophes. I collect moments of the human journey.”

more...
No comment yet.
Russia
To explore the broad topic of Russian culture and history
Curated by Erin Bouma
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russia Says It Plans to Pivot From Nuclear Deterrence, Avoiding Trump's Arms Race

When it comes to strategic deterrence, Russia might replace its nuclear weapons with conventional forces, in order to help reduce international tensions and strengthen world peace, Russian Defense Ministry Sergei Shoigu says.


    According to Shoigu, Moscow plans to rely on warships and submarines armed with cruise missiles to carry the bulk of its precision-guided weapons. “By 2021, we plan to more than quadruple the combat capabilities of our strategic conventional forces, which will fully meet the demands of [Russia’s] conventional deterrence,” Shoigu said. 

    Russia’s defense minister also reported that Moscow has no intention of being dragged into an arms race, saying the Kremlin plans to maintain the country’s current level of national security, developing its “general-purpose” forces to operate in peacetime and in armed conflicts, including missions against international terrorists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

More Than One Million Russians Convicted in 2016

More than one million Russians were found guilty of a crime in 2016, according to data released on Thursday by Russia's Federal Penitentiary Service. 
    The country's prison population as a whole fell by 15,000 people in the past year, dropping to 630,155 inmates on Jan. 1 2017. 
    Some 519,500 men and 49,200 women are serving prison terms in penal colonies, with a further 107,300 inmates held in pre-trial detention, the prison service said in a press release on its website.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Time of Uncertainty: How the EU and Germany See Today’s Russia

Time of Uncertainty: How the EU and Germany See Today’s Russia | Russia | Scoop.it

The German vision of Russia should be assessed through the prism of the political elite’s vision, and the political elite is currently searching for an optimal balance between, on the one hand, keeping a distance from Russia until the Minsk agreements for resolving the conflict in Crimea are implemented, and establishing control over the weapons trade in Europe so as not to be drawn into a new arms race with Russia, and, on the other, “maintaining a dialogue with Russia for optimal threat prevention.” 

    In late August 2016, the German foreign minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier characterized the attitude of Germany toward Russia as follows: “Russia is a central actor in what is happening in Syria and Ukraine,” and although dialogue with Russia is currently difficult, “the key to resolving [crisis situations]” and returning to the G8 format is in Moscow.

    Over the past few decades, European countries have with different degrees of success pursued either a policy of containing Russia (the UK), or a policy of engaging Russia (Germany), or, with mixed success, a combination of the two, depending on geographic, political, and economic interests (Czech Republic, Slovakia). In a changing world where nuances in political decision making erode the European political landscape, only time can answer the question of what coalitions will form on the European continent susceptible to conflict. However, time, in the short and long view, is frozen in uncertainty.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

A Young Russian Governor’s Fascist Chic 

A Young Russian Governor’s Fascist Chic  | Russia | Scoop.it
The first outlet to draw attention to Governor Alikhanov’s controversial clothing was the Telegram channel “Metodichka,” which has published political news since August 2016, often with bitingly satirical commentary.

“We thank acting Governor Alikhanov for his quick response. It’s good that he went with this version, and not ‘The coat doesn’t belong to me, but to my spouse, who’s a successful businesswoman and an accomplished marksman,” the people behind Metodichka wrote on Tuesday, mocking Russian officials’ tendency to deflect damaging allegations by citing the achievements of their partners.

Anton Alikhanov became acting governor of Kaliningrad in October 2016, after Evgeny Zinichev’s brief two-month tenure in office. Zinichev, who now serves as the deputy director of Russia’s Federal Security Service, formerly worked as Vladimir Putin’s personal body guard. Zinichev left his position as Kaliningrad’s acting governor quite suddenly, apparently overwhelmed and poorly suited to political life, paving the way for Alikhanov, who turned 30 just a few weeks before inheriting the governorship.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Prisoner of Putin

Prisoner of Putin | Russia | Scoop.it

The case of Ildar Dadin and what it means for Russia.


Dadin is probably the best-known political prisoner in Russia today. He holds the unfortunate distinction of being the first person jailed under Article 212.1 of the Russian Criminal Code. Those numerals — 212.1 — are notorious among Russian democrats. “No to 212.1,” read their placards.

     Enacted in July 2014 and taking effect at the beginning of 2015, this article is somewhat tricky, but it amounts to this: Repeated public protests of the government without the permission of that same government are banned. As democrats point out, the article is at odds with the constitution, adopted in 1993. Article 31 of that constitution guarantees the right to peaceful assembly, rallies, pickets, and so on.

    “The Putin regime is sending a powerful message heard throughout Russia of a repressive new reality unseen in decades,” wrote Paula Chertok, a lawyer born in the Soviet Union, and long living in the United States. “If you dare to speak out against government policies or leadership, the authorities will ruthlessly treat you as a common criminal and send you away for years in penal colonies.” So it has proven. Ildar Dadin is the proof. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

We'll Know Soon Whether U.S. Spies Bluffed on Russia

We'll Know Soon Whether U.S. Spies Bluffed on Russia | Russia | Scoop.it

Nunes said his committee intends to interview the analysts who wrote the report and ask them how they reached its conclusions and the basis for determining with "high confidence" that Putin was behind both the hacks and the leaks of the Democrats' e-mails. The report says the National Security Agency, which focuses on electronic eavesdropping, has "moderate confidence" in the conclusions.
    Nunes of course has been checking the intelligence community's work since he became chairman of his committee in 2015. But under President Barack Obama, he often complained that he was slow rolled by the spy chiefs. In some cases he had to reach out to lower-level intelligence officials to get information.
    Nunes has said he is puzzled by the speed with which the government produced this intelligence product on the Russian operation against the 2016 elections, given that the Obama administration has not previously released unclassified reports on Russia's hacking and dirty tricks. Russia is alleged to have hacked the State Department's unclassified e-mail system in 2014. The GRU was linked to a bomb placed outside the U.S. Embassy in Tblisi, Georgia, in 2011. U.S. intelligence assessments of these claims have not been made public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

RT, Russia’s government-owned news operation, aggressively backed Donald Trump

RT, Russia’s government-owned news operation, aggressively backed Donald Trump | Russia | Scoop.it

The assertion by American spies that Russian hacking gave Donald Trump an edge in the election is dominating headlines, but almost no attention has gone to an entirely separate focus of the report circulated Friday by the U.S. intelligence community — the influential role played by Russia’s government-owned, and increasingly high-profile, satellite news organization.

    No less than half of the 25-page report centered on the activities of RT, the global English-language operation formerly known as Russia Today that intelligence officials described outright as the “Kremlin’s principal international propaganda outlet” whose tentacles have spread at an alarming pace across the U.S. digital media landscape during recent years. 

    While intelligence officials did not specifically estimate the size of RT’s U.S. audience, they cited the outfit’s own claim to be reaching about 85 million Americans, and Friday’s report included a sobering chart that said RT content on YouTube receives about eight times as many total views worldwide as that produced by CNN.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

From Post-Soviet to Neo-Soviet

From Post-Soviet to Neo-Soviet | Russia | Scoop.it
In a series of polls conducted at various points over the past 25 years, the Levada Center has asked Russians about their nostalgia for the Soviet state and the reasons for its breakup. In the most recent sample (November 2016), 56 percent of respondents expressed regret about the Union’s collapse. This figure peaked in December 2000 at three quarters of those surveyed and has been above 50 percent all but once over the past quarter century (49 percent in the December 2012 sample).

Responses in the November 2016 version to the latter question were also consistent with prior surveys (asked since December 2006). Twenty-nine percent of respondents endorsed the “feckless and misguided ‘Belovezhskaya collusion (sgovor)’ between Yeltsin, Kravchuk, and Shushkevich” as the main reason for the Union’s breakup. Other popular choices are also vaguely conspiratorial, such as the complicity of foreign powers hostile to the USSR—the second most common response at 23 percent.

Other answers in the sample variously endorse the reasons for the Union’s breakup often cited in policy circles and academic interpretations: the disillusionment of the populace with Gorbachev and his leadership team, the weight of military expenditures on the country’s economy, the technological and economic backwardness of the Soviet state (including a reliance on oil and natural gas), and nationalism in the republics, among others.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

New Year's Holidays Through the Eyes of Old Russian Orthodox Christmas Cards

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

49% of Russians See No Challenger to Putin in 2018 Elections

Almost half of Russians believe there will no politician to challenge Russian leader Vladimir Putin during the country's 2018 presidential elections, a poll by the Levada center has revealed.

Some 49 percent of respondents said that Putin would face no real competition if he ran for his fourth term, the Interfax news agency reported. Twenty-six percent said that a rival would emerge before 2018, while 25 percent struggled to answer.

Expectations have changed significantly since 2012, when 49 percent of Russians believed that Putin would be challenged in the 2018 race.

This time, however, 63 percent of respondents said that they would want to see Putin continue as president, a dramatic rise from 34 percent in 2012.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Storm Warning Announced as Heavy Snow Hits Moscow

Today, Jan. 5, up to 9 millimeters of precipitation (equal to about 4 inches of snow) could hit Moscow. This is more than 20 percent of the average monthly precipitation — 42 millimeters — a representative of the federal Rosgidromet meteorological service told the Rosbalt news site.
    According the Rosgidromet,  the majority of the snow – up to 7 millimeters – has already fallen overnight, when meteorologists predicted heavy snowfall and even blizzard conditions in some areas. Nonetheless, the extreme weather will continue throughout the day, meteorologists say. 
    Heavy northern winds will continue to blow cold air masses into Moscow and the surrounding region, while cyclone air patterns will bring snow and winds of 5-10 meters per second. In some places, gusts of wind will reach speeds up to 17 meters per second.
    Temperatures will drop significantly this evening after the snowfall finishes, reaching minus 23-28 degrees Celsius by Friday night. On Saturday, as Orthodox believers mark Christmas, temperatures will fall to minus 23-29 degrees Celsius. The average daily temperature on Saturday will be 14 degrees below the climatic norm, meteorologists say.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russia’s church is poised between two pasts and an unknown future

Russia’s church is poised between two pasts and an unknown future | Russia | Scoop.it
For some really devout Slavic households, the Eve of Christmas (January 6th by the Gregorian calendar) is a time of long, intricate services and a family meal which begins when the first star appears in the sky. Hay is strewn about the house as a symbol of the Saviour's modest beginnings and a white linen table-cloth is a reminder of the baby's swaddling clothes. The meal is elaborate but, like all food over the previous 40 days, free of meat or dairy; only the following day, after the pre-Nativity fast has come to an end, can a nice dish of pork, or a coffee cake made with cream, be enjoyed. Historical accounts of Russian Christmas often add that the tsar's family observed Christmas with particular gusto, borrowing extra customs from their German cousins, just as the British royals did.  

That's what the text-books say, anyway. But the reality is that in Soviet times, Christmas was all but forgotten (or observed by a handful of people in secret) and people were successfully induced to focus their winter cheer and gift-giving on the new year. A secular "Grandfather Frost" replaced Santa Claus (Saint Nicholas) as a provider of goodies to children. A quarter-century after the fall of communism, Russians still celebrate new year with exuberance while the observance of Christmas is a learning experience, not an unbroken folk memory.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russia's military is more advanced than people thought

Russia's military is more advanced than people thought | Russia | Scoop.it
Russia has used a new aircraft that has never before appeared in war, and is launching new cruise missiles from the Caspian Sea that can travel more than 900 miles further than their American equivalent.

"This is an amazingly capable new weapon," Michael Kofman, a fellow at the Kennan Institute in Washington, DC, told The New York Times.

Russian battle tactics and strategy have advanced, too.

"What continues to impress me is their ability to move a lot of stuff real far, real fast," Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, commander of the US Army forces in Europe, said, per The Times.

This shows that Russian President Vladimir Putin has successfully modernized a military many thought was behind its Western counterparts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Iconic Landmark to Be Transferred to Russian Orthodox Church

The governor of St. Petersburg Georgy Poltavchenko announced on Jan. 10 that St. Isaac's Cathedral, one of the city's most famous museums, will be transferred to the Russian Orthodox Church, the RBC news website reported. According to the city's Property Affairs Commission, the cathedral will be given to the church for a 49-year long lease free of charge, the TASS news agency reported Thursday. 
    The property transfer might take up to three years, Nikolay Burov, director of the St. Isaac Cathedral Museum, said. Until then, the museum will continue to bear all the maintenance costs, TASS reported. 
    The Church informed the public that entrance to the cathedral will be free of charge – currently the museum charges 150-250 rubles ($2.5-$4.5). “No-one charges people for entering a church,” the Orthodox Church spokesman Vladimir Legoida said at a press conference on Thursday. “Everyone who wants to visit the cathedral will be guaranteed free access. Of course, [paid] tours will continue as well.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russian Yogi Charged Under Extremism Law 

Russian Yogi Charged Under Extremism Law  | Russia | Scoop.it

Legislation has been used against Scientologists, Protestants, and other small religious groups.


A St. Petersburg man arrested in October after giving a lecture on yoga now faces trial on charges of illegal missionary activity. Dimitry Ugai, the latest Russian to be sanctioned under harsh laws enacted last year against vaguely-defined “extremist” acts, is now “the talk of Russia's liberal social media scene,” Deutsche Welle writes. 

    Police took Ugai away after he finished the 22 October talk on the importance of vegetarianism in yoga. He said police threatened to hold him on remand unless he signed a blank sheet of paper, which he refused. 

    He was later released, but late last month he received a summons to attend a St. Petersburg court. If convicted he faces a 50,000 ruble ($840) fine. The court hearing has been postponed until next week, the Guardian reports, citing the state legal news agency Rapsi.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

As Trash Piles Up in Russian Town, Mayor’s Spokesperson Says Locals Are a Bunch of ‘Pigs’ 

As Trash Piles Up in Russian Town, Mayor’s Spokesperson Says Locals Are a Bunch of ‘Pigs’  | Russia | Scoop.it
There’s a quiet little place in Russia called Yugorsk. Located inside the Khanty–Mansi Autonomous Okrug, Yugorsk is a flat, forested, relatively affluent town. In Yugorsk, the people are as dirty as pigs. That part about the pigs, at any rate, is what a spokesperson for the city told reporters this week, after a city councilman criticized the mayor’s office for paralyzing the municipal trash pickup services, which have reportedly failed to collect any garbage since late December. 
     This Monday, city councilman Anton Pantin complained on Facebook that the outfit responsible for trash pickup, municipal unitary enterprise “Yugorskenergogaz,” hasn’t collected any garbage for two weeks. “This is insane! The locals here aren’t to blame for their bad luck with the mayor’s ‘relatives,’” Pantin wrote, referring to Mayor Rais Salakhov’s decision in November to appoint his own former brother-in-law as director of the enterprise.
    Pantin says Yugorskenergogaz has long been a “black hole” in the city’s budget, despite the fact that it collects fees from individual customers, in addition to its support from the government.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

No Beacon on the Hill

No Beacon on the Hill | Russia | Scoop.it
The report has the Russian president Vladimir Putin order an influence campaign aimed at the U.S. and sees Moscow as attempting to undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process and denigrate Secretary Clinton.

All true. More than that, as a Russian, I would say that Russia’s state-run media rarely do anything but engage in attempts to denigrate Western leaders and undermine public trust in institutions (and not just American institutions, for that matter). This is what Moscow’s media do on a daily basis because the Kremlin considers the institutions of the West hostile and uses all available policy tools to retaliate. And yes, the Kremlin thinks the media are policy tools, and is convinced everybody else thinks so too.

The U.S. intelligence assessment mentions Russian news media highlighting “a lack of democracy” in America, excessive surveillance, police brutality, and other injustices. “Not only are these perfectly legitimate subjects for journalism, but these are also the mainstay themes of American reporting on Russia,” writes Kevin Rothrock, web editor at the Moscow Times, an independent English-language publication in Moscow.

The way the Kremlin has always reacted to reports about corruption or arbitrary police rule, or the state of Russia’s penal institutions, is by generating similar reports about the West. Whatever the other party says the answer is always the same: “Look who’s talking.” This age-old technique, dubbed “whataboutism,” is in essence an appeal to hypocrisy; its only purpose is to discredit the opponent, not to refute the original argument.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Accused Russian Hacker Denies Working for Russian Government

Accused Russian Hacker Denies Working for Russian Government | Russia | Scoop.it

A young Russian hacker was surprised to see her computer company on the United States sanctions list last week. The White House fact sheet claims Alisa Shevchenko’s company “provided the GRU with technical research and development.” No details or proof was given. The GRU is Russia’s GRU military intelligence agency.

    In her recent interview with The Guardian, Alisa Shevchenko described herself as “a typical introverted computer geek” who is self-taught. She declined to say how old she was, stating it was an “impolite question.” She said, “If you really need a number then go ahead and make it up based on my photographs.”

    Shevchenko is known for working with companies to help them discover any flaws in their computer systems. Her interview with The Guardian was done via encrypted email. She claims she is currently located a few hours away from Bangkok. 

    She also said she is furious at her company’s inclusion on the blacklist, and denied ever working for the Russian government. She says the level of hysteria around the entire ‘Russian hacking’ story is insane, and suggests the U.S. authorities were guilty either of “a technically incompetent misinterpretation of the facts,” or it has been fooled by a counterfeit in order to frame her company.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

How Russia’s Conservative Movement Broke Through Online 

How Russia’s Conservative Movement Broke Through Online  | Russia | Scoop.it

In the last few years, we witnessed a conservative renaissance on the RuNet, though it's unclear where the community goes from here.


You might not expect it, but Nikolai Starikov claims to be a member of Russia's opposition. The “Great Fatherland Party,” which he founded in 2013, was barred from participating in the 2016 parliamentary elections—a decision Starikov says was “political.” His brand of opposition politics has an especially narrow focus.

    “Of course, we support our president on matters of foreign policy, but we believe that the continuation of policies started by the Medvedev government—the privatizations, the freezing of pensions, the sale of state property—all this is very dangerous for Russia,” Starikov told me in an interview. 

     Starikov criticizes the Medvedev government, especially the economic policies he considers to be “liberal,” but his most important belief is the need for stability against “external enemies.” In this context, Vladimir Putin's legitimacy as the head of state is not a matter up for discussion.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Hundreds of cyclists brave Moscow cold 

Hundreds of cyclists brave Moscow cold  | Russia | Scoop.it

Plunging temperatures in Moscow failed to dent the enthusiasm of hundreds of cyclists who took to the streets in a mass event.
   The organisers ignored warnings to cancel and say some 500 took part in the ride, aimed at promoting cycling.
   The participants, some dressed as Santa Claus or the Russian equivalent, braved temperatures of minus 27C.
   "Not one of the participants... ended up going to the doctors after it finished," organisers said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russian Hacking Hearing Pure Politics

Russian Hacking Hearing Pure Politics | Russia | Scoop.it
Main Street Columnist Bill McGurn on the Democratic Party’s sudden confidence in intelligence agencies and concern about cybersecurity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

One Answer Too Many: The Fall of Russia’s Only Independent Pollster Levada

There’s a knock on the door. “‘Hello! I’m a foreign agent. Can I ask you a question?” the person on the other end says.

Six months ago, Lev Gudkov could still smile during an interview with The Moscow Times at the thought of the average Russian’s reaction to such an introduction from a pollster at his door.

Since then the mood at the independent Levada Center has soured. On Sept. 5, the Justice Ministry included Levada on its “foreign agents” registry after finding the NGO was engaged in “political activity” and receiving funding from abroad. It came on the doorstep of a parliamentary vote and right after Levada published an 8-percent drop in ruling party’s United Russia’s rating.

The decision was a long time coming. The pollster first received a warning from prosecutors in 2013. Still, its current predicament is “a trial” and has an air of finality, says Natalya Zorkaya, head of sociopolitical research at the Levada Center, the strain visible on her face during a meeting at its headquarters in central Moscow.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Exiled Oligarch Khodorkovsky Opens School for Moscow Opposition Officials

Exiled oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky has opened a school for potential opposition candidates to run in Moscow’s 2017 municipal elections.

The school will train 400 election hopefuls to take on the role of a Moscow deputy, the RBC news outlet reported Tuesday. One hundred candidates are expected to make the final cut and take part in next September’s vote, according to Khodorkovsky’s advocacy group, Open Russia.

Students will take classes in campaign techniques, the foundations of Moscow city legislation, and public speaking. Both serving municipal deputies and political consultants are set to lead courses for potential candidates, who must share Open Russia’s “values,” and advocate for an independent judiciary, a competitive economy and free elections, RBC reported.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Siberians Mock Muscovites for Panic Over Record Freezing Temperatures

Even as Muscovites have taken to social media to vent their wintertime woes, Russians from across the country's colder climes began mocking their softer countrymen in the capital. 

"It's a rare day when the tweets of frozen Muscovites warm all of Russia," artist Artyom Loskutov from Novosibirsk wrote on Twitter.

Many Siberians were keen to show their friends in the capital a real Russian winter. Ilya Yablokov in the Siberian city of Tomsk shared this post on Facebook, showing the temperature hovering at a cool minus 46 degrees.  "I'm heading all this whining from Muscovites about the weather," he wrote. "I just want to show them this."

Moscow politician Vladimir Milov, originally from Kemerovo, was less amused, writing, "Today my news feed is filled with the traditional Siberian and Ural bullying about the Moscow "frost" (-25). Nice to know they love Muscovites."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Erin Bouma
Scoop.it!

Russian Literature Reading Challenge 2017

Russian Literature Reading Challenge 2017 | Russia | Scoop.it
I have many, many Russian Lit novels, short stories and plays I want to read in 2017. I want to continue with my Turgenev Project by reading a few of his novels and most of his short stories. I also want to read War and Peace (I've had an eleven month break from Tolstoy and I think that's long enough), the Brothers Karamazov and maybe another Dostoevsky, Demons by Gogol, Chekov's short story collection, some medieval Russian texts and Pushkin's Fairy Tales. I'm sure I'll think of more as it gets closer to 2017. As I said I'm really into Russian Literature at the moment (always).

I'll just be reading Classic Russian Literature (mostly the 19th Century) but I welcome anyone that participates to read 20th century or contemporary Russian Literature and Non Fiction.
more...
No comment yet.