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Is Complexity Ruining your Business? - Forbes

Is Complexity Ruining your Business? - Forbes | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
Most CEO's are well aware of the profit killers in their business: price wars, staff bloat, manufacturing cost blow outs and inefficient sales processes. But few address a more subtle but often more dangerous profit attacker.
Russ Bergeman's insight:

The idea of complexity "ruining" business is not new; economists call this idea transaction costs. The complex, global, and litigious society in which we exist has exponentially increased the costs of external and internal transactions.

 

I think it has just become habit for many businesses to fall into a mindset that anything worth doing, is worth doing complexly… rather than simply.

 

Thoughts…?

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Léonne Willems's curator insight, April 10, 2013 9:55 AM

Yes, it's a sad, sad situation. We use candles not for light or warmth, but for the idea of warmth, we need our social media not only for true value and knowledge sharing, but also for the idea of sharing as the most recent placebo for the effects of social isolation (research reveals isolation is far more devastating than feelings of loneliness!), we talk 'to' (s)talk, and YES, we control 'to' control for we cannot face insecurity: that's where complexity finds its 'raison d'être'. It's pure camouflage! Let's just observe without judging and let change be the result of this process - and not a project for the change result.

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Organization and Leadership Development
A virtual meeting place for those interested in joining a conversation about developing organizations and the leaders who power them.
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How Successful People Stay Calm

How Successful People Stay Calm | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

The ability to manage your emotions and remain calm under pressure has a direct link to your performance. TalentSmart has conducted research with more than a million people, and we’ve found that 90% of top performers are skilled at managing their emotions in times of stress in order to remain calm and in control.

 

The tricky thing about stress (and the anxiety that comes with it) is that it’s an absolutely necessary emotion. Our brains are wired such that it’s difficult to take action until we feel at least some level of this emotional state. In fact, performance peaks under the heightened activation that comes with moderate levels of stress. As long as the stress isn’t prolonged, it’s harmless.

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Lisa Armstrong's curator insight, February 15, 5:35 PM

This article will support your learning in Part B of this unit. It particularly presents the relationship between stress and performance. 

 

You may gain some ideas for improving your ability to achieve in the face of competing demands!

Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's curator insight, February 21, 8:48 AM

 

 

Maegan Pulman's curator insight, September 5, 10:41 AM

Stay calm and manage your emotions. 

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Leadership With Simon Sinek: Serving Those Who Serve Others

Jonathan Fields of Good Life Project spent close to an hour in deep conversation with Sinek discussing the impact of leadership, and how we should all be pushing ourselves by asking more questions and demanding that these questions be answered in a much simpler way.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Don Cloud's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:10 AM

Kenneth, thanks for sharing! 

 

An insight-packed chat with Simon Sinek!  Worth your time!

Richard Dillard, PMP, SSBB, ABD 7.1's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:23 PM

"The worst leaders are the ones that think they have to know as much or more than the poeple who work with them." - Simon Sinek

 

Simon may be on to something basic here, in spite of his misplaced reference to evolution, his misunderstanding of the human mind when it comes to self-preservation (the first law of nature), his miscomparison of human beings to animals and the obvious implications of overlooking the moral law giver when it comes to right and wrong (the first law of human nature).  In other words, while there is nothing in evolution that explains the imperative to tell the truth as apposed to telling a lie or accounts for developing an "attitude of giving" or a wllingness to sacrifice for others, we can and should take seriously this idea of accepting that we, as leaders, don't (and can't, by definition, if you accept that teams outperform individuals even when that individual is the team lead) know more than those who work with us and every time we act as if we do, it signals the beginning of a demise and our failure as leaders. 

 

We should also altogether support Simon's rejection of the leadership of Jack Welch (GE) and his veneration of the leadership of Jim Sinegal (COSTCO). 

 

In fact, many of the ideas presented by Simon in this interview are consistent with the things I wrote about in my latest book, but we'd likely differ on the cause (whether the first or most proximate) of a Leadership - Culture - Performance connection in producing the effects being endorsed.  The obvious question now is, does it really matter where we ascribe the cause of right and effective leadership?  I believe it does matter and provide the rationale on pages 96 and 97 of Real Leadership! Are You Ready?

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Failure Happens: Innovation and Serendipity

Failure Happens:  Innovation and Serendipity | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Innovation is not linear, but harvesting the value created by innovation is.   And when we try to cause innovation by linear thinking, we run into as much trouble as we would if we tried to harvest innovation value via the non-linear. 

 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Russ Bergeman's insight:

I had to read this article twice to really gain an understanding of the author's premise - innovation must be sown and harvested through simultaneous linear and non-linear thought.

 

What? Yep... that's what I thought too.

 

The world in which most of us exist (work, home, social) is typically linearly structured. Innovative outcomes usually come from non-linear thinking and action. But the linear world is necessary to support the innovative person, his thinking, and the implementation of the idea/concept.

 

Take a look at the article... let me know what you think...

 

Are you an innovator or part of the structure that supports innovation?

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Eveil & Emergence's comment, August 21, 2013 9:04 PM
“If you want to be innovative, fail often.”
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If You're Always Giving Orders, You're Not a Great Leader

If You're Always Giving Orders, You're Not a Great Leader | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
The best leaders spend five times more time teaching with questions than telling people what to do. What's your ratio?

Via The e.MILE Community
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John Michel's curator insight, July 24, 2013 10:19 PM

The magic question/direaction ratio: 5-1

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NeuroLeadership Institute’s Chief, on Shared Goals

NeuroLeadership Institute’s Chief, on Shared Goals | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
David Rock, the director of the NeuroLeadership Institute, says that by creating shared goals, managers can make everyone sense that they’re part of the team.

Via Anna Conrad
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Interesting insight into how the mind reacts to social interaction, especially in the workplace. David Rock theorizes that people may become neurologically scarred by the way they are treated by bosses and co-workers. I have found that the best way to heal these scars is by establishing (or re-establishing) a foundation of trust, honest communication, and accountability.

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Anna Conrad's curator insight, July 10, 2013 4:37 PM

The SCARF model is extremely powerful, helping leaders (and those being led) understand and deal with their emotions - two critical elements of emotional intelligence.  

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Make Good Decisions Faster

Make Good Decisions Faster | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
A simple know-think-do framework can work wonders.
Russ Bergeman's insight:

What allows an organization to make quick, and relatively accurate, decisions is a foundation of trust. This foundation allows people and teams to more effectively communicate and encourage accountability. As a former Marine Corps helicopter pilot, I experienced the construction of this foundation of trust first-hand. I also was part of units that were able to perform at the highest levels, with maximum flexibility and decisiveness. I do believe that these same concepts can be brought about within non-military organizations with the right attitude and a properly focused training program.

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5 Ways Managers Can Avoid Killing Employee Creativity

5 Ways Managers Can Avoid Killing Employee Creativity | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Successful organizations share several attributes - shared vision, focused goals, flexibility, leadership at all levels, etc. Creativity must certainly be included in this list of common attributes. It is often easy to ignore the ideas of the most creative people in an organization in favor of ideas of those who have been successful in the past. However, what worked in the past is not always what will work in the future. Leaders should always been on the lookout for creativity, even if it does not resemble what has been done in the past. 

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Douglas Arnold's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:57 AM

The investment in time and attention to creative workers is essential to any long term relationship with the employee. Organizational process -- along with zealots preaching unrealistic productivity goals -- all too often quelch the imagination and extinguish innovation.

Rolf Hagenow-Jansen's curator insight, July 28, 2013 2:32 PM

In my point of view create diverse teams is the most important point to foster creativity. 

CineversityTV's comment, September 9, 2013 1:23 PM
changing the paradigm. Sir Ken Robinson
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The 4 Pillars Of Stable Leadership

The 4 Pillars Of Stable Leadership | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Stable leaders model a level of constancy and consistency that individuals, teams, and organizations so desperately need, but often find missing.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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David Hain's curator insight, July 1, 2013 6:14 AM

Nice piece from Mike Myatt.

John Michel's curator insight, July 1, 2013 10:33 PM

A lack of stability harms culture, stifles productivity, erodes trust, and makes it extremely difficult to retain top talent. Instability can also be a harbinger of bigger problems. The passing of time will usually reveal unstable leaders also tend to be lacking in several other areas.

Rim Riahi's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:40 AM

Stable #leaders model a level of constancy and consistency that individuals, #teams, and #organizations so desperately need, but often find missing.

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What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy

What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Corporate culture is an incredibly powerful factor in a company’s long-term success. No matter how good your strategy is, when it comes down to it, people always make the difference. Strategy is rational and culture is emotional. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization. Thoughts...?

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Ajish Kumar's comment, June 27, 2013 10:23 AM
I do agree with you on strategy and culture. There are many companies that has good strategy, but horrible culture and drive people like crazy without understand the culture and diversity.
Ajish Kumar's curator insight, June 27, 2013 10:27 AM

Good one on strategy. I really like the simple definition of strategy.

Russ Bergeman's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:36 AM

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization.

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Why Transparency Is Essential to a Trusting Staff

Why Transparency Is Essential to a Trusting Staff | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
Transparent businesses not only have more loyal employees, but better brainstorming sessions and more productivity.

Via Susan Bainbridge
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Studies have shown that most employees quit their boss rather than quitting the job or company. This article shows the importance of employee engagement and trust as factors in the growth of companies. The bottom line is that an employee who is constantly looking over his shoulder will never reach full potential. The individual and the organization will suffer.

 

So… how do you build trust within an organization?

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The Most Valuable Business Commodity: Trust

The Most Valuable Business Commodity: Trust | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
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Garth Sanginiti's curator insight, June 21, 2013 8:36 PM

Great article that reinforces without a culture of trust in an organization, success is impossible. Particularly like the statement, "It is the relationships we forge—and the trust we create—that matters most to our success at the end of the day."

Yahya Qachach's curator insight, June 22, 2013 6:48 PM

amecsel.net

Christophe Mikolajczak's curator insight, June 24, 2013 4:21 PM

So fundamental: trust

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5 Reasons Leaders Become Followers

5 Reasons Leaders Become Followers | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
It?s hard to distinguish the leaders from the followers these days.  So many leaders are playing it safe, holding themselves, their teams and their organizations back because they choose to follow instead of lead.   Leadership is about taking...

Via The e.MILE Community
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Are you leading or following? The name plate on your door, label on your parking place, and title in the footer of your emails are meaningless unless you are being intentional and action focused in your organizational role.

 

This article has some good insight into some traps that people in positions of leadership fall into, which causes them to become followers.

 

One of the signs the author identifies as an indicator of a leader becoming a follower is when they begin to “deflect accountability”. This becomes evident in all aspects of how a leader communicates – from emails, to formal correspondence, and especially in verbal word choice and tone. When a leader, or anyone for that matter, begins to sound like a victim it is a slippery slope that leads to becoming a follower. When a leader takes on a victim mentality, in the form of passive aggressiveness or simply blaming things that are “out of their control”, can be extremely detrimental to an organization.

 

In my work with teams and individuals within organizations of all sizes I find that accountability is one of the key factors of success. When leaders model accountability, and team members are provided the tools to encourage individual and group accountability, teams succeed! But this is only possible when teams are built on a solid foundation that encourages cohesion through trust and communication.

http://www.theemployersedge.com

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John Michel's curator insight, June 12, 2013 6:14 AM

Leadership is about taking risks, seeing opportunities others don’t see, unleashing your passion, being entrepreneurial, working with a generous purpose and strengthening the promise of a better workplace culture. 

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 1, 2013 1:27 PM

It is okay for leaders to sometimes follow, but they must do this in service of  their goals and purposes. If they are following because they don't have a clear understanding of where to go, then they have abdicated their leadership role.

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Want To Find Brand Ambassadors? Start With Your Employees

Want To Find Brand Ambassadors? Start With Your Employees | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
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Thảo Lee's curator insight, October 19, 2013 10:04 PM

http://www.taiiwin565.com/tai-iwin-280/

Bad Spoon's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:20 AM

Comment convaincre des prospects de la valeur d’une marque si les employés qui travaillent pour celle-ci ne sont eux-mêmes pas convaincus ?

 

Au contraire, si ceux-ci sont passionnément attachés à leur marque, ils sauront la défendre et la valoriser, et seront des ambassadeurs de poids

Balamurugan T (2000+ Conn...)'s curator insight, November 8, 2013 1:18 AM

add your insight...

 

 
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10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You

10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Retaining good and talented employees requires maximizing their full performance potential. This is not only good for employee retention, it is also good for the overall performance of the organization. 

 

This article makes some great points about why people leave organizations.

 

It all starts with establishing and communicating an organizational culture, then hiring people who fit into and will perpetuate the culture. This is only possible when leaders have a solid understanding of what motivates and what demotivates their people. Without this understanding, it is nearly impossible to get the most out of people.

 

Russ

russ@theemployersedge.com

www.theemployersedge.com

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:24 PM

Have you ever noticed leaders spend a lot of time talking about talent, only to make the same mistakes over and over again? Few things in business are as costly and disruptive as unexpected talent departures.

With all the emphasis on leadership development, I always find it interesting so many companies seem to struggle with being able to retain their top talent. In today’s column, I’ll share some research, observations, and insights on how to stop the talent door from revolving.

Ask any CEO if they have a process for retaining and developing talent and they’ll quickly answer in the affirmative. They immediately launch into a series of soundbites about the quality of their talent initiatives, the number of high-potentials in the nine box, blah, blah, blah. As with most things in the corporate world, there is too much process built upon theory and not nearly enough practice built on experience.

Barbara Preyssas's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:20 AM

Ok, so it's not quite Sensory Emotions - but it's really interesting anyway :)

Brian Martin's curator insight, October 11, 2013 12:05 PM

A great reminder for Leaders and HR Departments everywhere.

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Four Ways to Lead Through Conflict

Four Ways to Lead Through Conflict | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
Difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict. – William E. Channing   French novelist and playwright ...

Via Jesse Jacoby & Emergent
Russ Bergeman's insight:

The only thing as certain as conflict in the workplace is its cause. The author lists the top five causes of workplace conflict - "...warring egos and personality clashes, poor leadership, lack of honesty, stress, and clashing values." All of five of these causal factors are centered on communication and interpretation. In order to effectively communicate, one must be able to accurately and honestly interpret the actions of others. 

 

One of the best ways to mitigate and/or learn to deal with conflict is by increasing levels of trust, communication, and accountability within an organization.

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The Mindset of a Problem-Finder

The Mindset of a Problem-Finder | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Michael A. Roberto discusses why problems go undetected for so long, how to spot patterns across an organization and how to avoid the “isolation trap” that prevents senior executives from seeing problems that are festering beyond their control.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 19, 2013 7:59 AM

Michael A. Roberto is the author of: What You Don’t Know: How Great Leaders Prevent Problems Before They Happen

Kathryn Laster's curator insight, July 23, 2013 7:11 AM

Even more about the importance of being a problem-solver

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Why So Many Leadership Programs Ultimately Fail

Why So Many Leadership Programs Ultimately Fail | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
You can't just learn about communication. You have to do it.

Via Anna Conrad
Russ Bergeman's insight:

I think Peter hits the nail on the head in this article... He says, "What makes leadership hard isn't the theoretical, it's the practical. It's not about knowing what to say or do. It's about whether you're willing to experience the discomfort, risk, and uncertainty of saying or doing it."

 

Whether you are talking about leadership development program, team building, or strategy development, participants must focus more on the practical than theoretical. This takes a special style of training and development, one that is experiential with practical exercises that demonstrate the power of actually leading (rather than just knowing about leading).

 

Learning to be an effective leader is a process that requires more than just attending a course or reading a book. Leadership development is a lifelong process that requires a foundation of knowledge, a trust in the leader's gut feelings, and consistent feedback and "rudder steers".

 

I am proud to say that my company, The Employers Edge, offers programs with all of the above mentioned attributes. Customized leadership modules, integrated coaching and follow-up, and dynamic exercises are the foundation of the content offered by expert facilitators and instructors. We do exactly what Peter argues is a necessary goal of any leadership program, "The goal of any leadership development program is to change behavior. After a successful program, participants should show up differently, saying and doing things in new ways that produce better results."

 

Russ

www.theemployersedge.com

 

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Anna Conrad's curator insight, July 11, 2013 8:49 AM

Leadership programs should not be based on theories - they should be results-focused and immediately applicable.  

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:52 PM

Excellent points made regarding reasons for failure.  Good article.

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Five Ways Leaders Help Others Belong, Not Just Fit In

Five Ways Leaders Help Others Belong, Not Just Fit In | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between fitting in and belonging. In fact, fitting in can be one of the biggest barriers to belonging, says researcher and author Brené Brown. Fitting in is about assessing...

Via The e.MILE Community
Russ Bergeman's insight:

This is a great piece that describes the challenge that many organizations deal with on a daily basis – the difference between employees fitting in and truly belonging. The most productive employees, those who are engaged, feel a sense of belonging, not just fitting in.

 

Although leaders can play a role in developing a culture of engagement, it really starts with the hiring process. I am a major proponent of implementing a scientifically and validated assessment tool (e.g., ProfileXT) to help on-board the “right” people who will have a more natural fit within the organization.

 

It may seem relatively easy for people to “adapt” in order to execute in a job or career. But, eventually, this will catch up with employees and show up in their overall work performance. When an organization hires people who will culturally belong leaders have more time to concentrate on other high payoff activities.

 

To learn more about the ProfileXT and it use for on-boarding, promoting, team-building, etc., visit - http://theemployersedge.com/assessment or contact me – russ@theemployersedge.com.

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John Michel's curator insight, July 9, 2013 6:08 AM

Creating a sense of belonging for people requires that leaders be engaged. It means investing time and energy to understand what’s going on with their people, their hopes and dreams, their fears and insecurities. Fostering belonging is about humanizing the workplace and creating a safe space where people can be vulnerable, real and authentic.

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How to Run a Better Meeting (Infographic)

How to Run a Better Meeting (Infographic) | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
A look at the state of business meetings and insight into how to make your meetings more efficient and effective.
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How Right Action Can Raise Morale and Productivity

Just 30% of employees are engaged and inspired at work, according to Gallup's 2013 State of the American Workplace Report, which surveyed more than 150,000 full- and part-time workers during 2012. That's up from 28% in 2010.

Via Jesse Jacoby & Emergent
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Leaders have a choice whether to accept disengaged employees within their organization. They can choose to ignore the disengagement and accept inefficiency, or they can make the right changes. 

 

One of the solutions missing from this article is terminating the most disengaged employees who are often times a cancerous influence on others. Right action not only includes leading by example and efforts to raise morale, it may also include reshaping the organization's workforce.

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Michael Porter's Big Ideas

Michael Porter's Big Ideas | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it
The world's most famous businessschool professor is fed up with CEOs who claim that the world changes too fast for their companies to have a longterm...

Via Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Organizational strategy must be intentionally focused on the leaders' values.  These values, when effectively cascaded throughout the organization, will help to create the boundaries of culture.

 

When helping organizations address issues surrounding strategic management and culture, I always begin with trust and accountability.

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:11 AM

The point is that while change happens faster, strategy should be designed to cope with change; strategy that doesn't understand and anticipate change is tactical, not strategic. Strategy must lay out how the company will adapt to changes in competition, technology, the economy, customers etc. It requires consideration of less likely (and even less plausible) opportunities and threats. This means that more effective organizations will be more adaptable and agile, not less in need of a strategy for aligning organizational activity. 

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What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy

What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Corporate culture is an incredibly powerful factor in a company’s long-term success. No matter how good your strategy is, when it comes down to it, people always make the difference. Strategy is rational and culture is emotional. 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Russ Bergeman's insight:

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization.

more...
Ajish Kumar's comment, June 27, 2013 10:23 AM
I do agree with you on strategy and culture. There are many companies that has good strategy, but horrible culture and drive people like crazy without understand the culture and diversity.
Ajish Kumar's curator insight, June 27, 2013 10:27 AM

Good one on strategy. I really like the simple definition of strategy.

Russ Bergeman's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:38 AM

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization. Thoughts...?

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60 Ways to Fix a Broken Culture

60 Ways to Fix a Broken Culture | Organization and Leadership Development | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
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Keith Meyer's curator insight, June 26, 2013 9:03 PM

I recently worked on an assignment where there was a definate "Culture Problem"......but that is often not the problem........not recognising that there is a culture problem, is the problem.

Nils Vesk's curator insight, June 28, 2013 3:20 AM

A nice write-up.

John Ludike's curator insight, August 26, 2013 6:13 AM

So just fourty more to find.

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How to Build Instant Rapport

Effective communication skills are highly valuable. They enrich our personal and social lives. In business it’s a matter of life and death.

Via Jesse Jacoby & Emergent
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