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5 Lessons On Influencer Marketing And Brand Transparency

5 Lessons On Influencer Marketing And Brand Transparency | RT - Brand Management | Scoop.it
The other day, I ordered a new drink at Starbucks.
Rebecca Taylor's insight:

This is a very interesting article, especially the statements it makes about brand transparency being the new goal of marketing. I think this is true to some extent, since the consumer is so skeptical now with the massive amounts of adverts they are exposed to on a daily basis. It definitely has truth when it mentions how we trust our peers and their opinions so much more than that of a banner ad or a billboard and how that is what companies should be focusing on when they think about their marketing strategies. 

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Emily Gavigan's comment, September 26, 2013 5:43 PM
I think this is a really insightful article where consumers are particularly skeptical in today’s market due to the vast amount of advertisements thrown at them from all directions. When looking to this concept of who is influential, I think this idea of power coming from peers over billboard ads or TV commercials is very valid. I personally am much more inclined to purchase something having had recommendation from a friend rather than going off a 30 second TVC trying to sell me something. Incorporating this concept of ‘influencers’ in to a companies marketing strategy will give them broader perspective of what communication tools to use when targeting their consumer.
Farah Ahmad's comment, September 26, 2013 7:21 PM
I agree with the points made in this article because we are so much more susceptible to comments made by our friends and family in comparison to those made by an advertiser. As Emily said, I an the same. It is more likely I would make a purchase in response to what a friend has said in comparison to that of a billboard. I think companies need to gain a better understanding of these influence and keep track of what people are saying about their band or which products hold better credibility. This will give them a better understanding of their customers as well as what strategies need to be used.
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Social Media Lessons You Learned in Kindergarten [Infographic]

Social Media Lessons You Learned in Kindergarten [Infographic] | RT - Brand Management | Scoop.it
Social Media - Getting involved in a social network can be intimidating when you don't know the platform's etiquette. But many of the rules in social media are the same lessons taught in ...
Rebecca Taylor's insight:

What a refreshing way to repeat a well-conversed topic. This article really hit the nail on the head with the main ‘rules’ or ‘lessons’ that you learned in kindergarten and how relevant they actually are to social media. I think the most important one here is Ask For Help. A lot of companies may think that will portray them as weak, but like the article says, it shows they want to learn and grow. It is also a great idea for brands to follow insightful and knowledgeable people within their industry. However, this would need to be closely monitored as you wouldn’t want to be linked with them if they say negative or contradictory things than your brand values as the damage could be irreparable. If you follow them, it would be seen that you therefore ‘endorse’ that negative behaviour. I think the last lesson is very crucial, to have fun! Companies and brands that have a sense of humour are far more likely to be retweeted and followed. Especially if that is the kind of target audience you want to appeal to. 

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Emily Gavigan's comment, September 25, 2013 7:30 PM
I think the article reflects very relevant and real lessons or rules that once learned in Kindergarten can be applied in taking on social media. One of the most important lessons I found in the articles was to ‘Be yourself’, because Social Media has become such a massive part of marketing that there is almost this stigma attached to it that if you’re not on board the social media boat you will be left behind which in some instances is true, however as rightly noted in the article you have to be true to who you are. Embrace the things you love and know you are good at and convey that online but don’t pretend you know the ins and outs of all the different social media channels because you think that you should. Social media is a very effective marketing tool but it has to actually hold relevance to your brand and be of benefit to what you are trying to achieve in targeting your consumers, otherwise its not helping to leverage your brand in any way.
Farah Ahmad's comment, September 26, 2013 7:13 PM
I think this article makes some great points. Paying attention is extremely important as you need to be able to keep up with both the internal and external factors affecting your brand. This includes competition as well as changes I'm your target audience. Social media will only be effective for the brand if it integrates with the brand and useful to target your customers.
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All aboard the equality bandwagon :: StopPress

All aboard the equality bandwagon :: StopPress | RT - Brand Management | Scoop.it
Rebecca Taylor's insight:

This article really shows how important it is for brands to be current and up to date with what is happening RIGHT NOW. 

 

Marriage equality throughout the world has been present in the media and for little old New Zealand to pass the Equality Bill and legalise same-sex marriage, it was bound to be a joyous occasion for many. 

 

You could say these brands and companies simply "jumped on the bandwagon" but each individual idea was fueled by the core values of their brand and therefore was merely an extension of them.

 

Air NZ married a same-sex couple mid-flight, The Edge Radio Station put on and broadcast a joint same-sex wedding and ZM hosted and broadcast the "Fabulous Gay Wedding". Each concept had it's own unique twist and even Westpac's rainbow signage was relevant and subtle. 

 

Five years ago, this would have been considered a major risk for these companies but it shows how times have changed and humanity has evolved that the reception from these promotions was all around very positive. The twittersphere was alive on Monday 19th August, with #marriageequality and #gaywedding trending nationwide. 

 

Integrated promotions from all three participants, that resonated the core values of the brands. 

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Farah Ahmad's comment, August 22, 2013 12:47 AM
I agree with your insight and think its really important for brands to keep up with the forever changing environment. This article is a good example of how brands have shown their support for same sex marriages and how the society is reacting positively. By providing these opportunities for same sex couples, Air NZ, The Edge, and ZM have gained many grateful consumers just by showing their support.
Alana Meikle's comment, August 22, 2013 6:27 AM
I also agree, when brands show that they are up to date and 'in with the know' it shows to consumers that they are making an effort to communicate with them and to make them feel as if they can relate to consumers.
Danielle Mcnae's comment, August 22, 2013 6:28 AM
I really like this article and your insight. I think its great that big brands are jumping on board and showing their core values. Its good as a consumer to see that the brand cares, and to see what they believe in by showcasing their beliefs on marriage equality. It also shows how companies are keeping up the adapting environment. By doing so company's such as the Edge, ZM, and Air NZ are most likely going to have an increase in loyal consumers, as they have showed their support on what some people still believe is bad thing.
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Love it? Or Hate it?

Love it? Or Hate it? | RT - Brand Management | Scoop.it
Rebecca Taylor's insight:

Marmite is a very unique brand. They are so blatantly aware that 50% of people love Marmite, while 50% hate it. Some companies may see this as a problem and immediately start discussing tactics for how to convert people. However, the way they choose to tackle it, was to embrace it. In their usual ‘tongue-in-cheek’ style, they first created a campaign that was all about loving it, or hating it. The next step was to launch this ‘neglect’ ad spoof. By playing on animal neglect advertisements they got across their message that it doesn’t matter if you love it or hate it, just don’t neglect it. This reinforces their message that Marmite is the sort of spread that you have as a cupboard staple and that most families may have it for months without actually using it. This may effectively ‘remind’ consumers of its presence in their pantries and perhaps follow with a spike in purchases. It is also important to note that this ad was released in the UK and so is relevant and effective to their audience. If this campaign was to be launched in New Zealand, it would be a totally different story. For your brand to be well positioned and relevant to your audience, you need to first know your audience and then continue to create campaigns that send out a consistent message. Marmite, you nailed it. 

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Emily Gavigan's comment, September 25, 2013 7:29 PM
I totally agree with your insight Rebecca, Marmite is a conscious consumer brand that has taken the time to really get to know its audience in order to produce such a successful product. The company isn’t concerned with any criticisms of the product because just like with anything there will always be supporters and critics however to actually embrace these non-marmite lovers is an extremely effective way in conveying a consistent message to all by maintaining this light-hearted tone of voice that takes place in all its communication to the public. A well thought out strategy.
Danielle Mcnae's comment, September 26, 2013 9:23 PM
I agree with your insight, Marmite is a product were consumers either just love it or hate it. I think Marmite is positioned well in the NZ market as it is actually the number one spread in New Zealand. The company shouldnt be concerned with any criticisms as they have many people who do truely love and trust the brand, which is reinforced by the demand that they had when they went into marmite shortage.
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Ensure That Strategy, not Tactics, Drives Your Social Media

Ensure That Strategy, not Tactics, Drives Your Social Media | RT - Brand Management | Scoop.it
Social Media - Before you can use a new channel, you must create a strategy around it. But many marketers struggle to create strategies. So, how can you begin to chart a successful ...
Rebecca Taylor's insight:

I believe this article is very relevant and is on point with how some companies view social media platforms. It is true that there are so many and there are new apps and websites being created everyday. These can be just a “phenomenon” for a short amount of time, or they can stand the test of the time, such as Facebook and Twitter. However, companies can’t just say, “we should be on Twitter” … it needs to stem from their existing strategy and make logical and financial sense to their specific brand. Most importantly, they need to know their audience. What is Twitter, or Pinterest, (or Scoop-it for that matter) going to do for your brand and it’s positioning? Who is going to ‘like’ posts, follow you and what do you want them to gain from this experience? There is the ability for companies to over-think this also and perhaps join too many platforms or have the same message going to the consumer through multiple channels. What companies need to do, like mentioned in the article is to sit down and think about who the consumer is and if it makes sense to them and your overall strategy to have a presence on a specific media platform. 

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Emily Gavigan's comment, September 26, 2013 3:15 AM
I completely agree with the article and your insight Rebecca, social media can create huge opportunities and be of great benefit for a business but not having a strategy in place for using these social media platforms will only cause confusion for the consumer. Successful brands come from those that remain continually consistent in conveying their message to consumers and this means researching the consumer and knowing what benefit this particular media platform will have. To perfectly sum it up as acknowledged in the article “without a comprehensive, clear strategy, your tactics will never achieve your goals.”
Farah Ahmad's comment, September 26, 2013 7:02 PM
I agree with your insight Rebecca the social media they choose needs to integrate with their strategy otherwise it will cause confusion to their customers. An example is Apple. Although Facebook is extremely common for businesses to use Apple does not have a page and I don't think it would even igo with their brand image. There marketing strategies are still so effective that they don't need all forms of social media tone successful.