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British sailor still missing

British sailor still missing | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

A British sailor has gone missing in Dubai while his ship, HMS Westminster was docked there for a visit, the Royal Navy says.

 

Leading Seaman Timothy Andrew MacColl, 27, from Gosport in Hampshire, was last seen getting into a taxi at 02:00 local time on Sunday 27th May 2012 after a night out.

Mike McNamara's insight:

Timothy MacColl has now been missing for over 1,800 days or over Five years!!!


Our thoughts continue to go out to his wife Rachael and Family who are still waiting for any news of his whereabouts.


Will he ever be found?


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New warship refuelled twice in Scottish port Invergordon

New warship refuelled twice in Scottish port Invergordon | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The Royal Navy has revealed how the new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth had to be refuelled twice during sea trials off Scotland.

Refuelling the warship in Invergordon in the Highlands presented a logistical challenge as 4,000,000 litres were required on both occasions.

Taking the fuel by road would have taken 120 lorry tankers and up to two weeks to complete, said the Royal Navy.

Two defence contractor fuel tank ships were used. The two ships transported the fuel from Gosport in Hampshire to Invergordon on the Cromarty Firth.

The vessels had to be weighted down at the stern so they could negotiate the only available berth at the Highlands port.

Fuel was then pumped to Rosyth-built HMS Queen Elizabeth using two 250m-long (820.2ft) hoses.

The preferred method of refuelling the aircraft carrier, by a fuel tanker at sea, is due to be done for the first time next year.

HMS Queen Elizabeth made two visits to Invergordon during the sea trials.

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F-35 flies into trouble over weak pound and £3bn extras

F-35 flies into trouble over weak pound and £3bn extras | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The cost of Britain’s next generation warplane is about to increase as the United States launches a £3 billion update for the aircraft to counter new threats.

A drop in the value of the pound against the dollar following the vote to leave the European Union means that the Ministry of Defence (MoD) spent £80 million more than anticipated in the year to March 2017 on its F-35 programme —a 10 per cent rise.


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HMS Queen Elizabeth comes to the Royal Navy's spiritual home in Portsmouth

HMS Queen Elizabeth comes to the Royal Navy's spiritual home in Portsmouth | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

As the Royal Navy’s largest and most powerful warship began her final approach to berth for the first time at her military base, Hawk jets and Wildcat and Merlin helicopters gave a thunderous ceremonial fly past.

For the Prime Minister, the arrival of the “mighty” £3 billion investment in “21st Century engineering” was proof Britain remained a “great global maritime nation”.

Admiral Sir Philip Jones, the First Sea Lord, said the 900ft long carrier was the “embodiment of Britain in steel and spirit”, perfect for an outward looking and ambitious nation ready to embrace life after the Europe Union.

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HMS Queen Elizabeth to reach Portsmouth this morning

HMS Queen Elizabeth to reach Portsmouth this morning | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The biggest and most powerful warship ever built by Britain is arriving at her home port today for the first time with photographs revealing what life will be like on and below her four-acre decks.

HMS Queen Elizabeth will send a message to the UK's allies and enemies that the country means business, according to her captain.

The £3billion behemoth is set to be the nation's future flagship, and her 700-strong company plus 200 contractors were given a river boat police escort into Portsmouth Naval Base this morning.

Pictures emerged of the ship on the water near Portsmouth as it prepared to dock, after leaving from Fife two months ago.

Thousands of people, including family members of those on board, lined the seafront to welcome the ship home.

Members of the crew mustered on the deck to wave to their loved ones as the aircraft carrier arrived.


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Isle of Wight: HMS Queen Elizabeth expected in Solent

Isle of Wight: HMS Queen Elizabeth expected in Solent | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The biggest warship ever built in the UK looks set to turn heads into The Solent this week.


The future flagship of the Royal Navy, Queen Elizabeth, is expected to arrive at her home port of Portsmouth next week with this Friday being the favourite — depending on weather conditions.


Queen Elizabeth is on sea trials and the Royal Navy says final confirmation of her arrival is only expected at relatively short notice — her itinerary dependent upon weather conditions.


If Friday is arrival day, she is expected to enter the harbour close to the 9.30am high tide when the depth of water is greatest.


Extensive dredging has been carried out to accommodate her 11-metre draft.


She is expected to be alongside the newly constructed Princess Royal Jetty for about eight months.

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How To Dock Britain's Biggest Warship

How To Dock Britain's Biggest Warship | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
Next generation simulator technology is allowing future crews of HMS Queen Elizabeth to dock the vessel in Portsmouth before she's even arrived there.

The ship’s bridge crew, from Captain down, have spent a total of around 150 hours in the simulator, practising the most critical parts of the navigation into the harbour.

Weather conditions can be changed to really challenge the crew so every eventuality can be prepared for.

The Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon has said the Royal Navy's biggest warship could arrive at its new home in ten days’ time.
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Navy ‘will be able to defend Royal fleet's £6bn aircraft carriers’ following US war games

Navy ‘will be able to defend Royal fleet's £6bn aircraft carriers’ following US war games | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

Rear Admiral Alex Burton, who serves as commander of UK maritime forces, said he was confident the UK's skilled fleet of frigates, destroyers and offshore patrol vehicles (OPVs) would protect the new carrier strike group.

His assurance comes after the number of vessels in the fleet was cut back, while some have been replaced with more powerful ships.

The Royal Navy has replaced 12 old Type 42 destroyers with six larger and more heavily armed Type 45s in recent years.

And the number of planned new Type 26 frigates has been scaled back from 13 to eight, but the vessels are set to be joined by five smaller Type 31 warships.

Rear Admiral Burton said: "We have enough frigates and destroyers to protect that task group.

"We will use coalition frigates and destroyers, but we have enough to deliver a sovereign task group.

"We're building OPVs as well to deliver some of the capabilities that would otherwise be delivered by frigates and destroyers.

"So I'm confident that with the eight Type 26s, the six Type 45s, the OPVs and the Type 31s that are coming online, that will be sufficient to protect the task group and deliver the other responsibilities that the department asks of us."

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The reasons HMS Queen Elizabeth is not nuclear powered

The reasons HMS Queen Elizabeth is not nuclear powered | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The reasons HMS Queen Elizabeth is not nuclear powered

Many people have wondered why the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers do not have nuclear propulsion like the US Navy’s Nimitz class ships. Here we consider the many good reasons why a conventional, although innovative propulsion system was selected instead.


Range and Replenishment


The primary advantage of a marine nuclear power plant is the unlimited range and available power it provides the ship. This range and power would be desirable for the QEC, but the costs and other factors largely outweigh these benefit. USN carriers are a few knots faster than the QEC, the speed of the ship can generate more wind over the deck to help heavily laden aircraft take off. This wind is less critical for QEC’s ski-ramp launched VSTOL aircraft.

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Royal Navy's new £8billion warships will be built with 65% foreign steel

Royal Navy's new £8billion warships will be built with 65% foreign steel | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The Tories have betrayed British ­workers by sourcing 65% of the steel for eight new Navy ships from Sweden.

British steel could have been used in the Royal Navy’s eight new Type 26 frigates if UK plants had been properly briefed, union bosses insist.

But up to two thirds of the metal for the £8billion order – the biggest Royal Navy deal after the latest Trident nuclear subs – will be bought from Sweden.

The fresh blow for the UK’s battered steel sector was quietly revealed in a series of written Commons answers, by Defence Minister Harriet Baldwin.

She said: “Around 4,000 tonnes of steel will be required to build each Type 26 Frigate. Steel will be sourced principally from the UK and Sweden.”

But in a second answer, she admitted: “We expect around 35% of steel for each ship will be sourced from UK suppliers in Scotland and Scunthorpe; approximately 1,400 tonnes per ship.

“For some grades of plate steel needed for the Type 26 Frigates the combination of thickness, size and flatness specifications means that the steel cannot be sourced in its entirety in the UK.”

Russia mocks Britain's new £3.1bn HMS Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier saying it's a 'huge sitting duck'

But community steelworkers’ union boss Roy Rickhuss said: “British steel is some of the best in the world, and our Government should be using this project to help British steelworkers.

“It’s not good enough for the Government to say we can’t make the right sort of steel. If we had a proper industrial strategy our steelworks would be equipped to meet the challenges.

“Steelworkers have made big sacrifices over the past few years; it’s now time for the Government to bring forward a strategy for steel that supports our industry and our steel communities.”

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HMS Queen Elizabeth sails the seas alongside US ships

HMS Queen Elizabeth sails the seas alongside US ships | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

Members of Britain's new carrier strike group including the HMS Queen Elizabeth are engaged with the US Navy and other international allies in Exercise Saxon Warrior off the coast of Scotland.


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Search and rescue training helicopters to be based on Portland

Search and rescue training helicopters to be based on Portland | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
The Ministry of Defence has announced plans for two helicopters to be based on Portland to train German navy pilots for search and rescue operations.

The two Sea King Mk5 helicopters are set to be re-deployed to carry out search and rescue training operations solely for the Royal Navy. The helicopters were previously used by 771 Naval Air Squadron in rescue missions in Cornwall.

Both helicopters, painted in a distinctive red and grey paint scheme, were retired from service in April 2016.

In a statement, the Royal Navy said that the helicopters will ‘once again have a life-saving role'.

The aircraft will now be leased to HeliOperations – a company supplying trained helicopter personnel to companies worldwide – to train German Navy pilots for search and rescue operations.

The Sea Kings will be retained as military aircraft, but will be operated from Portland’s training base at Osprey Quay until September 2018.

Ownership of the base was transferred from Coastguard Heliport to HeliOperations on July 1 this year after a high profile campaign to keep the coastguard rescue service, backed by South Dorset MP Richard Drax.

It will remain a refuelling facility for coastguard helicopters flying from Lee on Solent in Hampshire, Llyd in Wales, and Newquay in Cornwall.
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Royal Navy flagship heads for home port after sea trials

Royal Navy flagship heads for home port after sea trials | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

THE Royal Navy’s future flagship is expected to arrive in her new home port within weeks, Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon has confirmed.

The £3 billion aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth will sail into Portsmouth following extensive preparations at the naval base to accommodate the largest ship in the fleet.

Weather conditions mean the exact date of the carrier’s arrival is yet to be confirmed.

The window for entry will open on August 17 and the vessel is expected to dock no later than August 22.

The 280-metre, 65,000- tonne aircraft carrier has been undergoing sea trials since setting sail from Rosyth dockyard in Fife in June.

The carrier currently has no planes but flying trials are due to begin next year, with 10 F-35 Lightning II jets and 120 aircrew preparing for the task in the United States.

Sir Michael said: “In just two weeks’ time, the most powerful warship ever built for Britain’s famous Royal Navy is set to sail into her proud new home in Portsmouth.

“HMS Queen Elizabeth will be the Royal Navy’s flagship for the next 50 years, deploying across the seven seas, using her strike power to deter our enemies.”
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Preparations for the warship’s arrival saw more than 20,000 items ranging from a human skull to sea mines dredged up from Portsmouth Harbour.

A total of 3.2 million cubic metres of sediment – the equivalent of 12,800 Olympic swimming pools – were removed during the operation to deepen the harbour mouth to enable the Queen Elizabeth to reach Portsmouth Naval Base.


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New jobs to be created after Dorset firm secures £48m MoD contract

New jobs to be created after Dorset firm secures £48m MoD contract | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
A DORSET-based science and technology company has secured a £48million contract that will boost the local economy and create jobs.

Atlas Elektronik UK (AEUK) has been awarded a six year contract by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) to build and supply workboats for the Royal Navy.

The fleet of about 38 SEA Class vessels, which will assist navy ships from UK bases and on operations around the world, will be built at AEUK’s Winfrith base.

The deal will create 15 jobs locally and a further 45 across the country throughout the supply chain.

Chris Brook, of AEUK, said: “We are delighted to receive this contract from the UK MoD. The boats will be assembled at our Winfrith site with the support of a number of local suppliers.

“We see this as a tremendous benefit to the local economy boosting and sustaining employment for at least six years.”

Once completed, the fleet workboats will carry out a range of tasks including officer and diver training, Arctic exploration, passenger transport and explosive ordnance disposal.

For the duration of the contract, which starts next year, AEUK will provide an in-service support programme for the workboats including maintenance, spares provisioning, safety management and training.
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Royal Navy Leads Force To Seize Drugs In the Gulf And Indian Ocean

Royal Navy Leads Force To Seize Drugs In the Gulf And Indian Ocean | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The Royal Navy has led international efforts to seize drugs worth 400 million pounds during a five-month deployment to combat smuggling in the Gulf and the Indian Ocean.

HMS Monmouth was part of a multi-national naval task force which has seized nearly two tonnes of narcotics.

It included 265kg of heroin and nearly 500kg of hashish worth £65m. Since April, British, French, US and Australian warships in Combined Task Force 150 (CTF150) took part in Operation Southern Surge to counter narcotics trafficking, which funds terrorism in the region, scoring eight drugs busts.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said:

"The success of this joint task force with our French allies is a demonstration of Britain’s firm commitment to global maritime security and our ability to work with European allies to tackle the threat from drug smuggling. The money made from these nefarious criminal activities fund the terrorists who threaten us at home and abroad. As we leave the EU we will continue to work alongside our allies to tackle smuggling in the region and maintain the free flow of shipping."

The Franco-British team has been directing operations since April after taking over from the Canadian Navy and has just passed on command to the Pakistan Navy.

Navies from the Combined Maritime Forces, a coalition of 31 nations, take it in turns to lead the task force either from a command ship or the headquarters in Bahrain.

The Combined Task Force joint command is the latest in a series of shared commitments undertaken by the UK and France, demonstrating the enduring closeness of the two nations’ defence relationship.

Earlier this year, around 60 Royal Navy and Royal Marine personnel joined a French naval deployment to the Indian Ocean and the Far East, while British and French forces routinely operate together as allies in the Global Coalition and NATO.

This year, France is also contributing to the ongoing UK-led NATO enhanced Forward Presence deployment to Estonia.

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Photos: New Royal Navy Carrier Makes Her Home Port Debut

Photos: New Royal Navy Carrier Makes Her Home Port Debut | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

On Wednesday, thousands of people lined the waterfront to greet the new carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth as she sailed into her home port of Portsmouth for the first time.

Sailors lined the flight deck of the largest warship ever built for the Royal Navy as she passed Portsmouth's Round Tower. HMS Queen Elizabeth was also greeted with a flypast from the Fleet Air Arm, including Wildcat and Merlin helicopters and Hawk jets.

"Today we welcome our mighty new warship, HMS Queen Elizabeth to her home for the very first time. She is Britain's statement to the world: a demonstration of British military power and our commitment to a bigger global role," said Secretary of State for Defence Sir Michael Fallon. "The thousands of people across the UK who have played a part in building her and her sister ship, HMS Prince of Wales, should be immensely proud as our future flagship enters Portsmouth."

The carrier program has brought together industrial suppliers across the UK, with construction taking place across six cities and involving more than 10,000 people. This includes 700 businesses and suppliers, 800 apprentices and nearly 8,000 jobs at shipyards around the UK.


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Made in Fife: The story of the £3.1 billion aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth

Made in Fife: The story of the £3.1 billion aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

When Britain’s biggest ever warship set sail for the first time on June 26 after nearly a decade of construction, she had one significant hurdle to overcome before she could start policing the seas – she had to squeeze under the Forth bridges with just six feet to spare!

All eyes were on Chief Petty Officer Andrew Vercoe as he steered the £3.1 billion aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth out of the dock at Rosyth and into the North Sea in a nerve-racking 10-hour operation.


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HMS Queen Elizabeth: Portsmouth arrival date confirmed

HMS Queen Elizabeth: Portsmouth arrival date confirmed | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
The UK's new £3bn aircraft carrier will arrive in its home port on Wednesday, the Royal Navy has confirmed.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is due to sail into Portsmouth at about 07:10 BST following extensive preparations at the naval base.

Weather conditions meant the exact date could not be confirmed until Monday.

The 65,000-tonne ship has been undergoing sea trials since setting sail from Rosyth dockyard in Fife, where it was built, in June.

The 900ft (280m) long carrier cannot currently deploy planes but flying trials are due to begin next year, with 10 F-35 Lightning II jets and 120 aircrew preparing for the task in the US.

It is expected to be the Navy's flagship for the next 50 years.

Preparations for the arrival of the future flagship of the fleet, and its 700 staff, saw more than 20,000 items ranging from a human skull to sea mines dredged up from Portsmouth Harbour.

The Ministry of Defence said specialist dredging vessels had removed 3.2m cubic metres of sediment - the equivalent to 1,280 Olympic swimming pools - during the dredging operation carried out to deepen the harbour mouth to enable the Queen Elizabeth to reach Portsmouth naval base.

In a statement earlier this month, Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon heralded the ship's impending arrival, and declared it would be deployed "across the seven seas, using her strike power to deter our enemies".
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Ministry of Defence Facing Tough Financial Choices

Ministry of Defence Facing Tough Financial Choices | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
The ‘black hole’ in the Ministry of Defence’s (MoD) finances might, according to some estimates, be as large as £20 billion (or around 5% of projected spending commitments) over the next ten years.

Meeting this challenge will require either a large uplift in cash from the Treasury or a significant reshaping of government aspirations.

If the latter route is chosen, then the MoD would need to look at deleting capabilities from the military, much like in 2010 when the maritime patrol aircraft programme was cut, along with measures to reduce the size of the British Army, as well as other economy savings.

For example, previously and so-called ‘ring-fenced’ projects, such as the National Offensive Cyber Programme, a partnership between the MoD and GCHQ, might now need to be raided for cash, and capabilities deleted or delayed. In this, and other capabilities, the temptation will be to take from areas that are classified and beyond the public gaze.

Yet such measures, even if radical in extent, will not be enough to deliver a long-term balanced budget; that will require more far-reaching decisions – something a full defence review might still deliver if one is announced. Several areas are worthy of greater consideration.
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Ongoing manpower issues revealed by status of Royal Navy surface escorts

Ongoing manpower issues revealed by status of Royal Navy surface escorts | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

Although recent news for the Navy has been mostly positive, with HMS Queen Elizabeth at sea and orders placed for the Type 26 frigates, a quick look at the status of the escort fleet reveals the stresses that lack of manpower continues to exert.

HMS Dauntless has been laid up in Portsmouth since early 2016 as a harbour training ship, primarily because there was insufficient manpower to keep her operational. HMS Lancaster was also laid up but is now undergoing a major refit in Devonport. It has recently come to light that HMS Daring, which completed a very successful 9-month deployment in May 2017, has joined Dauntless in number 3 Basin in Portsmouth and will take over the harbour training ship role for up to 2 years. Dauntless is due to begin a major refit starting Autumn 2017 but effectively only three of the six Type 45s are available, with some activity also reduced during the summer leave period. HMS Defender will thankfully emerge from major refit later this year. In another unannounced move, HMS Portland, last at sea in March 2017 has also quietly been laid up in Devonport to save on manpower.


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A lot of work still to be done to bring the Royal Navy a real level of sustained strength.
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Penzance and Chiddingfold homeward bound from the Gulf

Penzance and Chiddingfold homeward bound from the Gulf | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
Four British warships met up in Oman - two about to begin a three-year stint in the Gulf, the other pair ready to start their marathon tours of duty in the region.

Heading for the UK are HMS Penzance (bound for Faslane) and HMS Chiddingfold (Portsmouth).

Assuming their places in Bahrain - the hub of Royal Navy operations east of Suez - are HMS Blyth and Ledbury, who've made the epic odyssey to the Middle East hopping from one port to another every fortnight or so…

…which is exactly what Penzance and 'Cheery Chid' must to do on their 6,000-mile passage home.

"The Royal Navy has a fantastic reputation as one of the best at mine detection and mine clearance," said Lieutenant Commander Jim Lovell, Penzance's Commanding Officer.

"After 1,105 days with providing that capability to the region with Chiddingfold, we've handed the baton on to our sister ships Ledbury and Blyth, who will continue to underpin the UK's wellbeing with their very capable mine hunters."
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Electronic Warfare Specialist receives inaugural best student award | Royal Navy

Electronic Warfare Specialist receives inaugural best student award | Royal Navy | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
This was particularly evident with the support he provided to students on the Leading Seamen EW course who benefitted from his clear and concise coaching and mentoring style.
Chief Petty Officer Craig McDonald

This new award is presented to the top POEW student as assessed by all EW training staff, who has achieved outstanding results in both theory and practical assessments, whilst displaying the qualities and leadership expected of any EW Senior Rate.

Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Craig Mcdonald explained why POEW David Bell, who is currently serving as Electronic Warfare Manager aboard HMS Montrose, was selected for the award.

“From the early stages of the course he displayed maturity and leadership in abundance.

“This was particularly evident with the support he provided to students on the Leading Seamen EW course who benefitted from his clear and concise coaching and mentoring style.”

David was presented with the award by Mrs Christina Nelson, ABEW Heyes’ widow, in the presence of the Commanding Officer of HMS Collingwood Capt Andy Jordan ADC, staff from Cobham Aviation and members of the HMS Ardent Association.

Mrs Nelson also donated two photographs of ABEW Heyes to be part of a display within Lewin Building.

Speaking after the presentation, David said, “I’d only been on board HMS Montrose a week when the Captain asked me to see him in his cabin.

“There he showed me the email, shook my hand and said “Congratulations”. It was a really pleasant surprise.

“It’s a shame that it was only myself from the course that got the award because we had such a good class and if I had my way, I’d give it to the whole class!”
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£48m contract will create jobs and a bring a 'tremendous' boost to the local economy

£48m contract will create jobs and a bring a 'tremendous' boost to the local economy | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
A Dorset-based science and technology company has secured a £48million contract that will boost the local economy and create jobs.

Atlas Elektronik UK (AEUK) has been awarded a six year contract by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) to build and supply workboats for the Royal Navy.

The fleet of about 38 SEA Class vessels, which will assist navy ships from UK bases and on operations around the world, will be built at AEUK’s Winfrith base.

The deal will create 15 jobs locally and a further 45 across the country throughout the supply chain.

Chris Brook, of AEUK, said: “We are delighted to receive this contract from the UK MoD. The boats will be assembled at our Winfrith site with the support of a number of local suppliers. We see this as a tremendous benefit to the local economy boosting and sustaining employment for at least six years.”

Once completed, the fleet workboats will carry out a range of tasks including officer and diver training, Arctic exploration, passenger transport and explosive ordnance disposal.

For the duration of the contract, which starts next year, AEUK will provide an in-service support programme for the workboats including maintenance, spares provisioning, safety management and training.

James Young, of AEUK, said: “We are very proud to be bringing our innovation to the supply and support of these highly capable workboats for the Royal Navy.”
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HMS Queen Elizabeth teams up with USS George HW Bush during exercises off Scotland

HMS Queen Elizabeth teams up with USS George HW Bush during exercises off Scotland | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

The maritime might of Britain and the US was on show yesterday as HMS Queen Elizabeth took part in exercises with American warships off the coast of Scotland.

Among the US carrier strike group was the USS George HW Bush, which is hosting more than 60 Royal Navy sailors and Royal Marines as they prepare for life on board HMS Queen Elizabeth.

As part of the drills over the past 10 days, Commodore Andrew Betton, Commander of the UK Carrier Strike Group, and his team have been directing jets, firepower and personnel across the task group as they practise fighting off a series of simulated threats from enemy forces.

Britain’s largest ever warship, which slipped out of Rosyth dockyard in June, joined the exercises on Tuesday as it continues its sea trials ahead of its arrival in Portsmouth in about two weeks time.

Captain Jerry Ky, HMS Queen Elizabeth's Commanding Officer, praised the USS George HW Bush battle group as "an awesome embodiment of maritime power projection".

“And given that the United Kingdom's Carrier Strike Group Commander and his staff are embedded on board the US carrier for Saxon Warrior shows the closeness of our relationship with the US Navy and the importance that both nations place on the delivery of the UK's Carrier Strike programme.

"HMS Queen Elizabeth is at the start of her journey to generate to full warfighting capability, but we are working hard to ready ourselves to take our place in operations and the line of battle alongside our closest allies."

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Rare First World WAR wireless station preserved to mark 70 years of protecting significant buildings

Rare First World WAR wireless station preserved to mark 70 years of protecting significant buildings | Royal Navy | Scoop.it
A rare First World War wireless station is among five historically significant places listed to mark 70 years since the listed building system was introduced.

The listing system was established under the Town and Country Planning Act of 1947 to protect historic buildings after heavy bombing in the Second World War.

The wireless station in Stockton was built in 1912 and is is thought to have been the Royal Navy's only station capable of gathering intelligence at the start of the First World War.

Now a private home, in its heyday Y Station Stockton was an integral part of a network of sites feeding information to the military and was perfectly positioned to monitor communications across the North Sea.
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Royal Navy tribute 100 years on from historic landing

Royal Navy tribute 100 years on from historic landing | Royal Navy | Scoop.it

100 years to the day since the first ever aircraft landed on a moving Royal Navy ship, a poignant and historic moment took place in Scapa Flow this morning, Wednesday, when a Royal Navy helicopter landed on the deck of the brand new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth.

The recently completed aircraft carrier was making its maiden visit to Scapa Flow, while still on sea trials.

Shortly after the ship dropped anchor, a Royal Navy helicopter landed on its flight deck, marking 100 years since Squadron Commander Edwin Dunning became first pilot to land an aircraft on a moving ship, also in Scapa Flow.

Tributes are to be paid to Commander Dunning in a special ceremony in the HMS Royal Oak garden of remembrance close to Scapa beach.

This morning’s commemoration event at Scapa will now start at 11.30am – half an hour later than originally planned.

The event will mark the 100 years since an aircraft landed on the deck of a moving ship for the first time – and a flypast by a Royal Navy jet will now take place at 11.40am.

The later start time is because of a slight delay affecting Royal Navy personnel travelling to Orkney for the event.

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