Rosa Parks
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Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus

Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus | Rosa Parks | Scoop.it
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This is the official site of the musem where the bus Rosa sat on is kept.

 

There is a whole page all about Rosa Parks.

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ciara's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:09 AM

Rosa is considered to be a mother too many for standing up for what she believes in.Rosa was concerned about freedom,equality, justice and prosperity for all people.Her unselfish acts led to later

The U.S. Congress calling her “the first lady of civil rights“, and “the mother of the freedom movement“

melitotodman's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:25 AM

Leading to the Montgomery Bus boycott, Rosa Parks defend not only her rights of a women, but also the rights for African Americans. The movement encourage Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) to make his I have a dream speech. 

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Rosa Parks Biography

Rosa Parks Biography | Rosa Parks | Scoop.it
Follow the accomplishments of civil rights activist Rosa Parks, and learn how her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus helped end public segregation, at Biography.com. View photos and video, and read Parks's full biography.
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Rosa Parks Biography~

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Montgomery Bus Boycott: The story of Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement

A site about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott


Via Karin Gilbert
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Good resources for my project

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Montgomery Bus Boycott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in the U.S. civil rights movement, was a political and social protest campaign against the policy of racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama. The campaign lasted from December 1, 1955, when Rosa Parks, an African American woman, was arrested for refusing to surrender her seat to a white person, to December 20, 1956, when a federal ruling, Browder v. Gayle, took effect, and led to a United States Supreme Court decision that declared the Alabama and Montgomery laws requiring segregated buses to be unconstitutional.[1] Many important figures in the civil rights movement took part in the boycott, including Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and Ralph Abernathy.

In 1944, athletic star Jackie Robinson took a similar stand in a confrontation with a United States Army officer in Fort Hood, Texas, by refusing to move to the back of a bus. Robinson was brought before a court-martial, which acquitted him.[2] The NAACP had accepted and litigated other cases, including that of Irene Morgan 10 years earlier, which resulted in a victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Commerce Clause grounds. That victory, however, overturned state segregation laws only insofar as they applied to travel in interstate commerce, such as interstate bus travel, and Southern bus companies immediately circumvented the Morgan ruling by instituting their own Jim Crow regulations. In November 1955, just three weeks before Parks' defiance of Jim Crow laws in Montgomery, the Interstate Commerce Commission, in response to a complaint filed by WAC Sarah Keys, closed the legal loophole left by the Morgan ruling in a landmark case known as Sarah Keys v. Carolina Coach Company. The ICC prohibited individual carriers from imposing their own segregation rules on interstate travelers, declaring that to do so was a violation of the anti-discrimination provision of the Interstate Commerce Act. But neither the Supreme Court's Morgan ruling nor the ICC's Keys ruling addressed the matter of Jim Crow travel within the individual states.

Black activists had begun to build a case to challenge state bus segregation laws around the arrest of a 15-year-old girl, Claudette Colvin, a student at Booker T. Washington High School in Montgomery. On March 2, 1955, Colvin was handcuffed, arrested and forcibly removed from a public bus when she refused to give up her seat to a white man. At the time, Colvin was an active member in the NAACP Youth Council, a group to which Rosa Parks served as Advisor.

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Another Wikipedia post about the Montgomery Bus Boycott!

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herman dallis's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:53 PM

Many leaders and strong individuals played a huge roll in this but one that stood out the most was Rosa parks with her being so brave I believe gave the black community a sense of hope to come that they would no longer take any more harsh and unfair treatment from whites and society that if she could be that brave to sit on that bus knowing her punishment that they could began to stand up for what they believed in.

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Rosa Parks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called "the first lady of civil rights" and "the mother of the freedom movement".[1]

On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey bus driver James F. Blake's order that she give up her seat in the colored section to a white passenger, after the white section was filled. Parks was not the first person to resist bus segregation. Others had taken similar steps in the twentieth century, including Irene Morgan in 1946, Sarah Louise Keys in 1955, and the members of the Browder v. Gayle lawsuit (Claudette Colvin, Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, and Mary Louise Smith) arrested months before Parks. NAACP organizers believed that Parks was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for civil disobedience in violating Alabama segregation laws though eventually her case became bogged down in the state courts. [2]

Parks' act of defiance and the Montgomery Bus Boycott became important symbols of the modern Civil Rights Movement. She became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. She organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including Edgar Nixon, president of the local chapter of the NAACP; and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a new minister in town who gained national prominence in the civil rights movement.

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More resources for my project, though this, of course, is just Wikipedia.

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