Robots in Higher Education
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Treebot Learns to Autonomously Climb Trees - IEEE Spectrum

Treebot Learns to Autonomously Climb Trees - IEEE Spectrum | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Not even trees can save you from this inchworm-inspired climbing robot (Treebot Learns to Autonomously Climb Trees http://t.co/pNmQwNog via @AutomatonBlog)...
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Robots in Higher Education
collection of robot stories
Curated by Scott Turner
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Ramblings about Social Robotics in Schools

Ramblings about Social Robotics in Schools | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Sometimes what I do as job can have some major personal pluses (I get to play with robots some of the time), one of these has been the opportunity to introduce people to social robots, and recently I have been lucky enough to managed to do this four times-  twice to my own computing students, but also to groups of primary school children in two events (see below). 

Apart from it's what I enjoyed doing; the social robots we are starting to see are great, but there is so much more that could be done. Who is going to develop this - possibly one of these children? Why not? It has taken nearly 40 years to get from R2D2 on the screen to some of the social robots we are seeing launched now, in another 40 years we might have something as bright as R2D2 (R2D2 was always brighter than C3PO). Why wouldn't one or more of these bright children or one of the students I teach, be the ones to contribute to this? They have the enthusiasm, with the changes in the National Curriculum in the UK they are developing some of the skills and asking the questions. Look at the work that work being done by Pi Foundation, the CamJam EduKit 3 robot kit (http://camjam.me/?page_id=1035) and especially products such as the OhBot (see bottom of the post for details of this robot) as just as a few examples of how this is being developed.
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Machine Learning Invades the Real World on Internet Balloons

Machine Learning Invades the Real World on Internet Balloons | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Project Loon's balloons learned to read the weather better than humans ever could on their own.
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Millimeter-Scale Computers: Now With Deep-Learning Neural Networks on Board

Millimeter-Scale Computers: Now With Deep-Learning Neural Networks on Board | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
University of Michigan micro-motes aim to make the Internet of Things smarter without consuming more power
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Robot Planet: Deals To Robotics Startups Proliferate Outside The US

Robot Planet: Deals To Robotics Startups Proliferate Outside The US | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The top 5 rounds to robotics startups outside the US since January 2015 went to China-based startups.
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Neuron Controlled Edge follower updated

Neuron Controlled Edge follower updated | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
an artificial neuron controlling the Bit:Bot to follow the edge of a line (it follows the left-hand side of the line)
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an artificial neuron controlling the Bit:Bot to follow the edge of a line (it follows the left-hand side of the line)

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Using simulation tools to optimize soft robotic systems

Using simulation tools to optimize soft robotic systems | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Simulation is a valuable tool to improve the energy efficiency of machines and it is now being used to analyze and optimize soft robotic systems to increase their utility, as described in an article published in Soft Robotics
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Honda’s Safe Swarm concept has cars mimicking fish for safer driving

Honda is looking to nature to improve the safety of driving, using bio-mimicry of the behavior of a school of fish to inform a new technical concept it's..
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A Super Light 20 Meter Robot Arm Built Using Helium-Filled Inflatable Segments

A Super Light 20 Meter Robot Arm Built Using Helium-Filled Inflatable Segments | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The Giacometti Arm with Balloon Body is a super light 1.2kg 20 meter robot arm built from helium-filled inflatable segments connected by artificial muscles. The arm has a camera mounted at its end,…
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Really cool 

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Motor learning affects car-to-driver handover in automated vehicles

Motor learning affects car-to-driver handover in automated vehicles | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Vehicles in the foreseeable future will be required to transition between autonomous driving (without human involvement) and full human control. During this transition period, the human, who has not been actively engaged in the driving process, must resume the motor control necessary to steer the car. The in-car study presented here demonstrates that when human drivers are presented with a steering behavior that is different from the last time they were in control, specifically the ratio of hand wheel angle to road wheel angle (emulating a change in vehicle speed), they undergo a significant period of adaptation before they return to their previous steering behavior. However, drivers do not require an adaptation period to return to previous driving behavior after changes in steering torque. These findings have implications for the design of vehicles that transition from automated to manual driving and for understanding of human motor control in real-world tasks.
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Science for robotics and robotics for science

Science for robotics and robotics for science | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Science Robotics has been launched to cover the most important advances in the development and application of robots, with interest in hardware and software as well as social interactions and implications.
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Sketch, an Artistic Robot from Stanford's Experimental Robotics Class - YouTube

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Hybrid EEG/EOG-based brain/neural hand exoskeleton restores fully independent daily living activities after quadriplegia

Hybrid EEG/EOG-based brain/neural hand exoskeleton restores fully independent daily living activities after quadriplegia | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Direct brain control of advanced robotic systems promises substantial improvements in health care, for example, to restore intuitive control of hand movements required for activities of daily living in quadriplegics, like holding a cup and drinking, eating with cutlery, or manipulating different objects. However, such integrated, brain- or neural-controlled robotic systems have yet to enter broader clinical use or daily life environments. We demonstrate full restoration of independent daily living activities, such as eating and drinking, in an everyday life scenario across six paraplegic individuals (five males, 30 ± 14 years) who used a noninvasive, hybrid brain/neural hand exoskeleton (B/NHE) to open and close their paralyzed hand. The results broadly suggest that brain/neural-assistive technology can restore autonomy and independence in quadriplegic individuals’ everyday life.
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my robot BETT2017

my robot BETT2017 | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it

I only had about 2 1/2 hours at BETT 2017 due to external time pressures so to say I didn't yet a chance for a good (or even a bad) look around is an understatement; so I am not reviewing the show just a few notes on what I did manage to see.

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Professors build AI to help autonomous vehicles locate themselves on maps

Professors build AI to help autonomous vehicles locate themselves on maps | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Self-driving cars could account for 21 million new vehicles sold every year by 2035. Over the next decade alone such vehicles—and vehicles with assisted-driving technology —could deliver $1 trillion in societal and consume
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China sees fast development in robot industry

China sees fast development in robot industry | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
China sees fast development in robot industry. The labour force of the future will be compromised of Robots. Any Job that can be automated will be automated
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Self-driving boats will soon be setting sail

WIRED presents three self-driving boats, including the Saildrone, Roboat and Darpa's anti-submarine-warfare continous trail unmanned vessel
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Soft robotics: Technologies and systems pushing the boundaries of robot abilities

Soft robotics: Technologies and systems pushing the boundaries of robot abilities | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The proliferation of soft robotics research worldwide has brought substantial achievements in terms of principles, models, technologies, techniques, and prototypes of soft robots. Such achievements are reviewed here in terms of the abilities that they provide robots that were not possible before. An analysis of the evolution of this field shows how, after a few pioneering works in the years 2009 to 2012, breakthrough results were obtained by taking seminal technological and scientific challenges related to soft robotics from actuation and sensing to modeling and control. Further progress in soft robotics research has produced achievements that are important in terms of robot abilities—that is, from the viewpoint of what robots can do today thanks to the soft robotics approach. Abilities such as squeezing, stretching, climbing, growing, and morphing would not be possible with an approach based only on rigid links. The challenge ahead for soft robotics is to further develop the abilities for robots to grow, evolve, self-heal, develop, and biodegrade, which are the ways that robots can adapt their morphology to the environment.
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Robot 'learns' how to function in human environments

Robot 'learns' how to function in human environments | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Think your office is too cluttered for a robot to deal with? New research from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm shows how robots can autonomously 'learn' their way around a dynamic human environment.
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World’s largest hedge fund to replace managers with artificial intelligence

World’s largest hedge fund to replace managers with artificial intelligence | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Bridgewater Associates has a team of engineers working on a project to automate decision-making to save time and eliminate human emotional volatility
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Festo's Fantastical Flying Robots

Festo's chief pilot gives Spectrum a private demo of a few of its incredible robotic animals: eMotionButterfly, AirJelly, and AirPenguin Read more
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Hybrid EEG/EOG-based brain/neural hand exoskeleton restores fully independent daily living activities after quadriplegia

Hybrid EEG/EOG-based brain/neural hand exoskeleton restores fully independent daily living activities after quadriplegia | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Direct brain control of advanced robotic systems promises substantial improvements in health care, for example, to restore intuitive control of hand movements required for activities of daily living in quadriplegics, like holding a cup and drinking, eating with cutlery, or manipulating different objects. However, such integrated, brain- or neural-controlled robotic systems have yet to enter broader clinical use or daily life environments. We demonstrate full restoration of independent daily living activities, such as eating and drinking, in an everyday life scenario across six paraplegic individuals (five males, 30 ± 14 years) who used a noninvasive, hybrid brain/neural hand exoskeleton (B/NHE) to open and close their paralyzed hand. The results broadly suggest that brain/neural-assistive technology can restore autonomy and independence in quadriplegic individuals’ everyday life.
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Mimicking biological movements with soft robots

Mimicking biological movements with soft robots | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Designing a soft robot to move organically—to bend like a finger or twist like a wrist—has always been a process of trial and error. Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applie
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Robotic vertical jumping agility via series-elastic power modulation

Robotic vertical jumping agility via series-elastic power modulation | Robots in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Several arboreal mammals have the ability to rapidly and repeatedly jump vertical distances of 2 m, starting from rest. We characterize this performance by a metric we call vertical jumping agility. Through basic kinetic relations, we show that this agility metric is fundamentally constrained by available actuator power. Although rapid high jumping is an important performance characteristic, the ability to control forces during stance also appears critical for sophisticated behaviors. The animal with the highest vertical jumping agility, the galago ( Galago senegalensis ), is known to use a power-modulating strategy to obtain higher peak power than that of muscle alone. Few previous robots have used series-elastic power modulation (achieved by combining series-elastic actuation with variable mechanical advantage), and because of motor power limits, the best current robot has a vertical jumping agility of only 55% of a galago. Through use of a specialized leg mechanism designed to enhance power modulation, we constructed a jumping robot that achieved 78% of the vertical jumping agility of a galago. Agile robots can explore venues of locomotion that were not previously attainable. We demonstrate this with a wall jump, where the robot leaps from the floor to a wall and then springs off the wall to reach a net height that is greater than that accessible by a single jump. Our results show that series-elastic power modulation is an actuation strategy that enables a clade of vertically agile robots.
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