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Les Misérables

Les Misérables | Robinson France | Scoop.it
Introducing one of the most famous characters in literature, Jean Valjean - the noble peasant imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread - L...
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Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables is an epic novel telling the stories of the French lower class during an arguably semi-fictional French Revolution taking place in the 19th century. The novel is divided up into five sections. I will be focusing on the first section, entitled Fantine. This section begins by introducing Monsieur Myriel, the bishop of a town the book calls D—, but which in reality represents Digne, a town in the far south of France. The bishop is wholly selfless and gives all of his possessions away to the poor, including his own home. One day, a barefoot traveler arrives at the bishop’s door, and we later find out he is named Jean Valjean, a man just released from a nineteen year prison sentence. The bishop permits him to stay until morning, but he leaves with M. Myriel’s silverware in the silence of night. He is caught and brought back by police, and instead of becoming angry, M. Myriel defends him, giving him his silver candlesticks and making Jean Valjean promise to become an honest man. The book skips to two years in the future and follows the story of Fantine, a seamstress who has an illegitimate child that could compromise her employment, so she is forced to send her to another town to live with an innkeeper and his family, and the innkeeper, Monsieur Thénardeir, charges Fantine a very high price to take care of her. Fantine then witnesses a drastic change in her hometown as a newcomer to the town begins to change the way things work.

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A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities | Robinson France | Scoop.it
'Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; -- the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!'
After eighteen years as a politica...
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Charles Dickens is critically acclaimed and widely respected as one of the greatest authors Britain has ever produced and has written timeless stories beloved by many. A Tale of Two Cities is a beautiful story of love that teaches lessons. Dickens' style of prose is very similar to that of Victor Hugo, with beautiful descriptions of characters and detailed scenes and histories of his subject. Dickens crafts a beautiful story with A Tale of Two Cities, and it has always been one of my favorite novels I have read in high school.

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Monseigneur Madeleine

Monseigneur Madeleine | Robinson France | Scoop.it
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Valjean's identity has been blurred since it was taken from him in prison and he became 24601. Valjean assumes a new identity after being made quite wealthy by the bishop's generous gift. Valjean becomes Monseigneur Madeleine, a respected man who becomes a factory owner and is appointed mayor of his new town, Montreuil-sur-Mer.

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24601

24601 | Robinson France | Scoop.it
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Jean Valjean is a prisoner recently released from his nineteen-year sentence that finds his way to M. Myriel's home. When he was in prison, he had no identity. He was not called Jean Valjean, but rather assigned the number 24601. This is a picture from the movie opera adaptation of Les Misérables of 24601 as he works in the galleys.

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The French Revolution

DocuTV - The French Revolution On July 14, 1789, a mob of angry Parisians stormed the Bastille and seized the King's military stores. A decade of idealism, w...
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This documentary is a historical retelling of the story of the French Revolution, starting with the roots of Louis XVI and Maximilien Robespierre. Louis was married young to Marie Antoinette, an Austrian Princess, a marriage which served to unite the two kingdoms of France and Austria. Louis was a young boy who was not fit to be King of any country, and he refused to consummate his marriage. Louis's actions caused quite a bit of talk among the people of France, who finally became displeased enough with their position in the Third Estate that they decided to revolt. Robespierre was a schoolboy when King Louis visited his town, and young Maximilien was chosen to give an address to Robespierre, to which he paid no attention. Robespierre then began to feel a hatred for the King and all of the first two estates, who were so separated from the Third that one bourgeoisie family could likely have afforded to feed half of France if they chose not to live such a lavish life.

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World History in Context - Document

World History in Context - Document | Robinson France | Scoop.it
World History in Context
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This article is a short biography of the life of Revolutionary leader and Enlightenment thinker Maximilien Robespierre. Robespierre began as a law student in his father’s footsteps, but after he developed a hatred for King Louis XVI, he quickly joined the political scene with his forward thinking and sense of social justice. He spoke often to the National Assembly, but was paid no attention because his ideas were so far ahead of his time. Instead, Robespierre found an audience in France’s Jacobin Club, where radical views were much more widely accepted. Groups like the Jacobin Club eventually became the men who overthrew the constitutional monarchy in August 1792, much to the pleasure of Robespierre. Robespierre became an influential during the famed Reign of Terror, but never officially sat atop any offices that gave him control of all of France, because Robespierre and the new revolutionary leaders were against such offices. So for that time, Robespierre ran the show from behind the scenes, simply as a member of committees, giving speeches that spurred action from the Committee of Public Safety.

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World History in Context - Document

World History in Context - Document | Robinson France | Scoop.it
World History in Context
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The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, not to be confused with a similarly named declaration that came in 1793, was written in 1789, only 43 days after the storming of the Bastille. The declaration was a basis for French law drafted by the National Assembly which contained many ideals from the emerging age of Enlightenment philosophy, which emphasized freedom and questioning the cultural and societal norms of the time. This draft came about as a result of King Louis XVI’s negligence and his fruitless faith in the Estates General and its ability to produce documents that were to appease the irked nation that he commanded.

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Monseigneur Myriel

Monseigneur Myriel | Robinson France | Scoop.it
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The man in the background of this picture is Monseigneur Myriel, the generous bishop that makes Jean Valjean a new man. Myriel donates his home and evreything he has to the poor, except for his beloved silverware, until Jean Valjean shows up. After Valjean is caught stealing almost all of M. Myriel's silverware, M. Myriel decides instead to forgive him and give him his priceless silver candlesticks. He makes Valjean promise "to become an honest man" and is thus credited with making Valjean change his ways for good.

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Genepi - Groupement Étudiant National d'Enseignement aux Personnes Incarcérées

Genepi - Groupement Étudiant National d'Enseignement aux Personnes Incarcérées | Robinson France | Scoop.it
Le groupement étudiant national d'enseignement aux personnes incarcérées est une association de loi 1901 sans affiliation politique ni religieuse, créee en 1976.
Stephen Isaac Robinson's insight:

Genepi is an association based in Paris France that deals with education and prison systems. The website is in French so I cannot guarantee that my translation is perfect. It appears that the association is dedicated to the education of prisoners in France. It is a student group, and they send students (probably college-aged) to help assist in the education of prisoners through meetings during visits. The students help tutor the inmates, and the company itself assists with their education about the outside world. The goal of the company is to set the inmates up for a better life once they leave the prison system and can go back out into the world to get a job. The company is not religiously affiliated, and they do not belong to any political party. They provide incarcerated persons with a better life once they are sent into the outside world and forced to reintegrate into society.

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French Geography

French Geography | Robinson France | Scoop.it
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France is a country that in the modern age has become a powerful country. Over the years, France has been a center for growth and new ideas, the origin of Enlightenment thought and revolutoins that shaped the world. France has one of the most densly populated cities in the western world in Paris, and has beautiful countrysides south of Versailles. It is one of the largest tourist destinations in the entire world.

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