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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Rivers | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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NEARC GIS Educator's Day

Notes from Seth Dixon's keynote address at NEARC's GIS Educator's Day delivered in Nashua, NH on Sept 29, 2013.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:02 PM

I was delighted to invited to discuss the importance of GIS and geospatial technologies in education at NEARC's GIS Educator's Day.  Earlier this year I gave a presentation at Brown University for the Choices Program on a related topic (so forgive some of the topical overlap).  This slideshare document has hyperlinked slides so you can access the digital resources mentioned in the talk if you wish.        

mariosuarez's curator insight, September 29, 2013 4:31 PM

gis y  educacion geoespacial

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Earth Science Week

Earth Science Week | Rivers | Scoop.it

Take part in Earth Science Week 2013! Held October 13-19, ESW 2013 will promote awareness of the many exciting uses of maps and mapping technologies in the geosciences. “Mapping Our World,” the theme of ESW 2013, engages young people and the public in learning how geoscientists, geographers, and other mapping professionals use maps to represent land formations, natural resource deposits, bodies of water, fault lines, volcanic activity, weather patterns, travel routes, parks, businesses, population distribution, our shared geologic heritage, and more. Maps help show how the Earth systems – geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere – interact.


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Malini Mehan's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:49 AM

Earth Science week unleashes the mechanism to understand the  dynamic world. It is a great way to observe and understand the constanly evolving processes that bring about changes in the physical and social landscape. From the evolution of islands off the coast of southern Pakistan, as was reported after the deadly earthquake of 24th September to freak weather and migration of illegal immigrants from Europe to Africa, understanding mapping techniques would give valuable insight into the interaction of the Earth Systems.

Elaine Watkins's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:35 AM

Some awesome activity ideas and unit plans on this site for teachers to do with Earth Science!

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 30, 2013 3:58 PM

Bacana! 

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Vittle: Turn your iPad into a Recordable Video Whiteboard

Vittle: Turn your iPad into a Recordable Video Whiteboard | Rivers | Scoop.it

Vittle lets you quickly capture any idea, and share them with anyone to view on their own time.

Vittle works like a magic whiteboard that records what you write and say:

Annotate and sketch using the ultra-smooth ink of our proprietary Inkflow Engine,Resize and move anything around the page,Zoom in to focus on key points,Visually navigate through even complex topics.

Use Vittle to build a video library on any subject. It is also a powerful tool for collaborating across time and space with any number of people.


Via Nik Peachey
Dean Hervat's insight:

Kind of reminds me what I see on Khan Academy.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, August 26, 2013 7:42 AM
Looks interesting,thanks.
Vicki Mast's curator insight, September 13, 2013 11:24 AM

I just downloaded the free version which looks good, but may have to upgrade. The features look well worth the $3.99 price. You can move & resize your drawn objects, zoom in/out, etc. If you're working on creating "flipped classroom" videos, or how-to tutorials this may be what you need. Check out their website and user guide for the details.

D G Stevenson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 9:01 AM

Useful for explaining concepts in a visually interesting way. 

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42 Amazing Maps

The map, as an innovation, is extremely important. Simply constructing a useful representation of our world onto a piece of paper (or clay or vellum or whate...

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Jyri-Pekka Kukkonen's curator insight, September 26, 2013 2:18 AM

mielenkiintoista...

jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

if graphs are the language of economics , maps speak for geographers and they are also a great way to show econmic data

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:13 PM

unit 1

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Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together

Puzzle: Put the Congressional Districts Back Together | Rivers | Scoop.it

Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other.


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Noel Magee's curator insight, April 11, 2015 8:07 PM

This short, simple depiction of gerrymandering serves a strong message. Congressional districts have literally been turned into a jigsaw puzzle. While we can all agree that it is nice to have votes in our own favor, it is unfair to allow political parties to divide up the United States unfairly. It is imperative that such an important decision be fair and justifiable. For the good or our nation, gerrymandering needs to be controlled. When it comes to elections, the United States should be divided fairly and properly. Any altering of the district lines should be considered unethical, immoral, and should be made known to the public so they can decide what should be done. This type of decision affects every single individual living in America, and this should be the least of our worries. It may be beneficial to political parties at the time, but the changing of these should be an eye opener of the type of congressional "leaders" that we look to to make executive decision regarding the rest of our lives. 

 

*Module 7

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:51 PM

This showed me how unfair gerrymandering is and how it is a total false representation of what the people want. This diagram not only showed me how it works but it also showed me how it is so unfair...

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:36 PM

I. Gerrymandering is the practice of redrawing congressional districts after a decadal census to favor one political party over the other. In this puzzle, the user has to place the congressional districts onto the state/county. 

 

II. I liked this puzzle. I thought it illustrated the oddity of the redrawn districts and highlighted the unfairness of the voting system. The weird shapes of the districts showed how hard the political officials would try to get a voting area where they would be supported. The unfairness is also illustrated with the idea that the congressional districts can be put into a puzzle, where a fair district would be shaped like rectangles or equally sized squares. 

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Rivers | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:10 PM

Geography and current events

Olivier Tabary's curator insight, November 28, 2014 12:06 PM

Many interesting tools to practice and to discover

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:04 AM

Amazing resources about places and topics in Geography

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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Rivers | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon, Kristen McDaniel
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:21 AM

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 9:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.