Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2
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5. Ebony Kent (Lowes Menswear Retail Worker - Assistant Manager).

5. Ebony  Kent (Lowes Menswear Retail Worker - Assistant Manager). | Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Ebony…. Ebony is 33 years of age and is a full-time assistant manager at Lowes menswear in Yeppoon. Over the many years of her working she has had many retail jobs consisting of, manager at rockmans and payless shoes. She works 30 hours a week and thoroughly enjoys this working roster as she is able to go home do the everyday choir activities and spend all the rest of her day with her family and friends. Ebony thrives to spend as much time as possible with her family, friends, and her work life. Achieving and performing ‘safe’ work habits in the workplace is necessary for her everyday working and job requirements in the retail industry. What Ebony most enjoys about her career is that every single day is different, as different kinds of customers have to be approached and served in other ways. She also finds that the day brings her challenges as the store is always receiving new stock; which therefore means she has to rearrange the shop majority of the time for new stock to be placed. She can never imagine what is going to happen throughout the day; there is always something innovative and exciting going on. She thrives on working to the best of her ability and loves to explore new challenges throughout her job. One day, her dream is to work as an area manager for if not Lowes but another retail company Ebony throughout her day has to continuously examine her activity at work to make sure she is meeting the Australian Retail Standards for Occupational Health and Safety.

Melissa Grieve's insight:

It is has been stated by the Australian Government that working in the retail sector can be hazardous, especially when you are a full-time worker, just like Ebony is(European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005) . Below are mentioned the main Occupational Health and Safety Risks that are involved in the retail industry.  

 

Violence and Verbal Abuse from Customers: Customers violence to workers is all-too-common in the retail industry. Attacks can occur from all kinds of situations, from when staff have to deal with troublemakers, thefts and robberies, angry customers and drugged or dunk customers. Violence from customers towards staff members can come from: threats, verbal abuse and harassment; therefore making staff members such as Ebony anxious and stressed (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005). This risk is defiantly not included in your job description and there should be no blame if you are involved in an incident of this kind. The only way Ebony /retail workers could prevent and reduce violence from occurring in the workplace includes the following: analysing the environmental design surrounding you, safety and security devices active and up to date levels, reporting, work practices and guidelines and training (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005) .

 

Lifting and/or Moving Heavy Loads: Lifting and carrying heavy loads in retail is a common cause of injury among shop workers, as it can be dangerous and is a common requirement of your daily work activities. For example for Ebony as she relays the shop everyday she is constantly lifting, moving and rearranging heavy loads. The aspects that can have a major impact on the dangers of this issue consist of: weight of the load, shape and size, stability and the movement and motion of the of the load.  To prevent this issue from occurring and to reduce the risk of injury it is advisable that Ebony/retail workers don't lift or move heavy loads from, cramped storage areas, unstable railings, unsafe ladders and heavy loads on top shelves (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005).

 

Slips, Trips and Falls: Slips and trips in the retail trade are a very well-known cause of injury, both to the staff and the customers. The characteristics that have an effect on this risk are, wet or uneven floors, spillages and things being left or unattended on the floor are among the main cause of this issue. Although this risk can be prevented by completing the following: wear non-slipping footwear, keep objects off the floor and away from passageways, unsafe accidents or conditions to be reported and clear up straight away any spillages/breakages (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005).

 

Sprains and Strains (Musculoskeletal Disorders): Sprains and Strains is a very common and serious risk in retail, as it can be a trigger from many things, such as: lifting, working, reaching in awkward positions, working with equipment that is difficult to use, and repetitive and fast movements. All of these aspects can give us aches and pains which can lead to further severe injuries (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005). Also standing for several hours, as you do in retail, can cause serious backache and pains in the legs; which as well can cause injuries down the track. Even though these issues are used in retail's everyday activities their can still be some ways in which they can be prevented. These include: ask whether your work can be rotated, make sure your receiving your rest breaks, and if you notice you are working with awkward movements or getting aches and pains from work then it is important for you to report it immediately (European Agency for Safety and Health at Work ,2005). 

Reference:

European Agency for Safety and Health at Work. (2005), Advice for Young Workers, Hazards and Risks in the Retail Trade, Viewed 10th April 2014, http://www.osha.mddsz.gov.si/resources/files/pdf/E-fact_05_-_Hazards_and_Risks_in_the_Retail_Trade-_advice_for_young_workers.pdf

 

 

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3. Bob Grieve (Mining Truck Driver).

3. Bob Grieve (Mining Truck Driver). | Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Bob...... Bob is 49 years of age and is a full time truck driver at BMA Moranbah mines. He works a five day roster which refers to, five days on, and five day off. Only recently about three years ago Bob transferred between careers of being a mining technician to being a truck driver. Ever since the change Bob has never regretted it, he finds he is alot more time on his hands, and the added stress has now disappeared. He found that being a technician he was bringing work life home and it had gradually started to consume his social life. Now with a changed career, work life stays at work and his social life with his friends and family has improved greatly. Bob thrives to accomplish the very best at his job by always completing all tasks provided to a efficient and effective manner. Through his workings as a truck driver, he also understands that performing and achieving 'safe' working habits, is essential for completing his everyday activities and requirements; as making sure that the Australian Standards for Occupational Health and Safety are met, is an extremely vital aspect of working in the mining environment. In the future Bob wants to continue his workings as a truck driver as he thoroughly enjoys his day to day activities as he finds every single day is different with new challenges always arising.   

Melissa Grieve's insight:

Mining truck drivers is a long lasted occupation, and throughout its time it has been recognised as being a job that is liable and arduous to disease and injury. Truck drivers at the mines drive with a capacity of more than 3 tons, to transport materials to and from  particular destinations (Geneva, 2000). This weight capacity is alot more than your general truck driver; therefore this can result in more risks and hazards for the driver, in this case it is Bob. The risks and hazards that Bob can encounter during his everyday job requirements, are as mentioned below:

 

Accident Hazards:  Accident hazards is one of the major issues of truck driving in the mines, as there is so many risks involved in your day to day work activities. One of the many main issues is the increased risk of road accidents on the mine site; which is a result of  prolonged driving periods. This issue generally results in the driver becoming drowsy, thirsty and hungry and wanting to consume alcohol and drive at high speeds to finish the job at a quicker manner. Another main and severe issue in the mining industry of truck driving is the overturning of heavy loaded trucks. This will occur when the road conditions are dangerous, mechanical failure, head-on collisions, excessive speed increase etc. Another major accident hazard issue is regarding explosions, chemical burns and severe intoxication by hazardous chemicals. This issue is triggered by dangerous good (e.g. flammables and explosives, toxic substances) (Geneva, 2000).  

 

Physical Hazards:  Physical hazards for truck driving consist of the following: Exposure to high amplitude (results in severe headaches or future hearing loss), exposure to direct and reflected sunlight and vibrations throughout the whole body from driving on constant unsteady surfaces (can damage functions of the chest, abdominal organs and musculoskeletal system) (Geneva, 2000).

 

Chemical Hazards: Being a truck driver at the mines you will encounter a diversity of chemical exposures. This is due to the fact that truck drivers deliver materials that can contain hazardous poisons. Working at the mines delivering of unhardened concrete is extremely common. This material exposes the driver to chromium and alkaline substances; which puts them at risk of chemical burns and skin reactions. Drivers can also often encounter severe headaches, nausea or dizziness, after being exposed to toxic chemicals being released into the air (Saltzman & Belzer, 2007).

 

Ergonomic Hazards: Ergonomic risks/hazards vary extensively and can include the following: loading and unloading heavy freight, awkward positions, and working in confined spaces. The effects of these hazards can cause the driver serious injury to someone's body and your overall health (Saltzman & Belzer, 2007). 

 

References: 

 

Geneva, H. (2000). International Hazard Datasheets on Occupation, Mining Driver/Truck/Heavy, Viewed 7th April 2014, http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---safework/documents/publication/wcms_186282.pdf

 

Saltzman, GM. & Belzer, MH (2007). 2003 Conference Report and Selective Literature Review, Truck Driver Occupational Safety and Health, Viewed 8th April 2014, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2007-120/pdfs/2007-120.pdf

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Martin Grieve (Civil Engineer)

Martin Grieve (Civil Engineer) | Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Martin… Martin is 23 years of age and is a full-time graduate civil engineer for a company name John Holland. Martin started studying to become a Civil Engineer in 2008 and graduated in 2012. He first got a job out at Kurtis Island, off Gladstone then got transferred with John Holland to the Yeppen Bridge in South Rockhampton. Martin thrives to spend as much time as possible with his friends, family and his work life. Achieving and performing ‘safe’ work habits in the workplace is essential for his everyday working and job requirements. What Martin most enjoys about his career is that every single day is different, and challenging. He can never expect what is going to happen throughout the day; there is always something new and exciting going on. One day, his dream is to work in a high cooperate building where he is the head of the engineering department. He thrives on working to the best of his ability and loves to explore new challenges throughout his career. Martin throughout his day has to constantly analyse his activity at work to make sure he is meeting Australian Standards for Occupational Health and Safety. 

Melissa Grieve's insight:

Working on construction and especially as a civil engineer can become a risky business as you are being exposed to many safety hazards throughout your working experience. Throughout a civil engineers career there are a number of safety issues that they can come across (Jeffery, 2011). These are as mentioned in detail below:

 

Asbestos Exposure: Asbestos exposure has been considered as a serious hazard for civil engineers, especially for those workers like Martin that are involved in everyday workings of fixing building and roads. Asbestos in buildings is found in the floors, walls and shingles. Workers that are involved in road design, such as Martin, are frequently being exposed to asbestos dust, even when repairing of older roads takes place. Asbestos is located in the road gravel and when the overflow of traffic occurs the gravel is then released into the air, creating dust (Jeffery, 2011).

 

Physical Danger: As a civil engineer, you will most likely spend majority of your time in the office. Workers will obsess over environmental impact statements and survey data. They will spend countless hours double-and triple-checking building load calculation and project estimates. However, with all these calculations occurring on the workplace, workers could forget about the important aspects that occur on a job site; known as safety hazards. For example: If engineers are assessing the strength of a construction building, they can tend to forget the safety issues that could be involved while completing this task. While analysing and looking around the buildings foundation, the worker could get beaned by a screw (accidentally), which is dropped from a scaffold, 200-foot-high above the ground. This is a major safety hazard as the engineers especially civil tend to forgot about these problems, their main concern is where the money is on the calculator thumb (Jeffery, 2011).  

 

Stress: Being a civil engineer involves three factors that are completely out of your control; however these factors still tend to become stress-related issues even though they cannot be controlled. As a civil engineer you may be waiting for an environmental consulting firm to send forth their report, so you can start the evaluation process of the proposed projects environmental impact that the building may create. Also another issue that can influence stress is the waiting of a civil engineering technician to complete their survey so that the refinement of the site plan can begin. Weather can also have a major impact on the overall plan and completion time as it puts construction projects behind schedule and the deluge from the weather may wash away soil from the buildings foundation. Unsettling weather can cause the building to be compromised especially if there is a loss of soil from the buildings location. At the end of the day none of these delays are the civil engineers fault but it can generally increase the person’s level of stress in and out of the workplace; which can have an impact on their overall working capabilities (Jeffery, 2011).  

 

Adverse Ground or Physical Obstructions or Conditions on the Site: A civil engineer is exposed to numerous amounts of risks during work execution by encountering unforseen physical and site conditions or obstructions. Risks such as: underground rocks, underground pipe and crossings and high ground water. These hazards are a huge threat to working in construction that is why workers, especially civil engineers, should undertake a full site investigation before entering the workplace. Investigating the workplace upon arrival should minimise the overall risk injury reports (Jeffery, 2011).  

 

Reference: 

 

Jeffery, H. (2011). Encyclopedia of Occupational Health and Safety ,  Types of Projects and their Associated Hazards, Viewed 2nd April 2014, http://www.ilo.org/oshenc/part-xvi/construction/major-sectors-and-their-hazards/item/525-types-of-projects-and-their-associated-hazards

 

 

 

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4. Bill Grieve (Teacher - Head of Mathematics).

4. Bill Grieve (Teacher - Head of Mathematics). | Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Bill...... Bill is 56 years of age and is a full time mathematics teacher and the speaker for the teachers union at St. Brendan's College, which is located in Yeppoon, Queensland. He works a five days a week and this involves a very hectic timetable as he is the head of mathematics at the school. Bill thrives on challenging his students to the best of their ability to enable them to achieve the best possible marks they can. Bill tries to as much as possible to have a balance with his work life and his friends and family. He believes that this is the best possible way in succeeding in a healthy and happy life, which in this present moment he is very fulfilled with the way his life is. What Bill enjoys most about his career is that every single day is different in various aspects, and that there is always a new and exciting challenge to embark upon. Bill stated that he has accomplished all of his dreams, he is now 56 years of age and states that this is where he will be retiring. He has been at Brendan's for 25 years now and has never regretted any of it, he believes it is the perfect place to retire. Bill throughout his career has had to analyse his daily activities to make sure that he was meeting the Australian Standards for Occupational Health and Safety.

Melissa Grieve's insight:

A teaching career has rewards that no other job can possess. Teachers have the satisfaction of helping a child out to achieve their best possible results, for example with Bill it would be their mathematics ability (Wile, 2013). However the enjoyment of teaching, comes with a few Occupational Health and Safety risks that need to be acknowledged. The everyday OHS risks that teachers/Bill can encounter are mentioned below:  

 

Workplace Violence: Violence towards students is well notified and taken very seriously, but what often gets forgotten and unreported is the everyday violence that teachers encounter. During the 2007-08 school year, over 30,000 Australian public school teachers were physically assaulted whilst being at school. This had been based around the National Education Association. An additional 50,000 teachers were & endangered with other acts of violence (Wile, 2013). Verbal abuse also, while it is not life-threatening, is a major factor and contribution to a teachers stress rate. As a teacher it is extremely important to take this information and not blind site it as it is a serious OHS issue amongst the teaching community. It is a very excellent idea to keep a record of any threats a student has made, no matter how small (Wile, 2013).

 

Burnout/Stress: It can be a heavy burden and great responsibility being a teacher, as you are dealing with all kinds of people, from students to parents, parents to teachers, teachers to teachers etc. After a while it can all just get to overwhelming and exhausting for them and they can begin to feel worn down by their dealings with argumentative students, uncooperative parents and school administrators. This hazard for teaching all comes back to the pressure increase of consistent test scores, reduced school resources and new tasks being enforced for teachers to complete, that are unrelated to their job title (Wile, 2013). These factors will create a recipe for disaster resulting in teachers stressing and burning out. This is an extremely severe and serious risk in the workplace, as stress can lead to numerous problems within your health. These consist of: sleeping problems, muscle strain, headaches, chest and muscle pain and upset stomachs. Although the major and more serious health conditions that can develop are depression, anger, anxiety, drug or alcohol abuse and social withdrawal. These are all very serious stress related health problems, and OHS risks that can develop throughout your workings. In the long run though, there is no real way to prevent them from occurring; the best possible and only role you can play is by making sure that you take good self-care when you are not required to be at work (Wile, 2013).

 

Disease Transmission/ Illness: Majority of teachers spend their time at work with students, parents and colleagues; which makes them at risk to viral and bacterial l infections, which is a serious OHS regulation for the workplace (Wile, 2013). When you're in a classroom with 25 or more students day in and day out, there is bound to be one kid in the room whom might have an illness; automatically this increases your chance of developing a virus as well. Preventing this issue is extremely difficult as there is merely not enough hand sanitizer that can eliminate the risk of catching an infection after you've been sneezed on, coughed on etc (Morgan, 2014). The only possible way this hazard could be prevented, is by notifying parents of the seriousness of this issue and to enforce the issue to parents, that if students are sick they are to stay home and not contaminate everybody else (Morgan, 2014).

 

To conclude it is very important as a qualified teacher to Enter the workplace with your eyes peeled, so that you can take the appropriate measures to look after yourself, your career and your students.

 

References:

Morgan, LA. (2014).Work CHRON, The Hazards Of Being A Teacher, Viewed 10th April 2014, http://work.chron.com/hazards-being-teacher-9309.html

 

Wile, E. (2013).The Nest, The Hazards Of Being A Teacher, Viewed 10th April 2014, http://woman.thenest.com/hazards-being-teacher-12425.html

 

 

 

 

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2. Steven Green (Plasterer).

2.	Steven Green (Plasterer). | Jobs of Five People and the Hazards that they can Encounter - Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Steven..... Steven is 23 years of age and works as a full time qualified plasterer for a private business, where his cousin Ben is the boss and the owner. Steven started his apprenticeship of plastering at the age of 19; and four years later after working extremely long and painful hours he finally got his certificate, to qualify him in his trade. Ben offered him this apprenticeship four years ago, as he knew Steven was interested in obtaining a apprenticeship in either an electrician or plaster. Steven thrives to achieve the best at his job by always doing beyond his work expectations. Along with these attributes he also seeks to spend as much time as possible with his family and friends; this enables balance in his life. Steven knows and understands that attaining and performing 'safe' work habits in the work field, is indispensable for his everyday job and working requirements. Steven throughout his day has to continuously examine his activities at work, to make sure that the Australian Standards for Occupational Health and Safety are met. What Steven enjoys most about plastering is that every single day varies; he thoroughly enjoys working to the best of his ability, and loves for new challenges to arise on the job site. One day, in the far future, his ultimate dream is to own his own cooperate business, where he is his own boss, just like his cousin Ben. 

Melissa Grieve's insight:

By Steven working as a plasterer he is faced with many OHS risks and hazards throughout his everyday activities; which could result in severe injury or even death (Donagi, 2009). Hazards and risks that are related to this job are as mentioned below:

 

Accident Hazards: Accident hazards of a plaster includes working at heights, slips falls, falling objects or other work tools. As a plaster you are always moving and lifting heavy objects and work tools, working from high places (Stair rooms, scaffolding, ladders etc.) and you are constantly working from confined and dangerous spaces which can encourage plasters to slip and fall (Donagi, 2009).

 

Physical Hazards: Physical Hazards of a plaster can generally be forgotten as it's not a well known OHS standard; but it is just as important as the other requirements for your daily workings. Physical hazards that a plaster can experience throughout his career is: Direct exposure to sun and its ultraviolet radiation (working outdoors), Potential exposure to radon gas (Emitted under certain states from concrete), excessive noise exposure (resultant from mechanised and manual tools) and exposure to severe weather which can cause chronic or acute diseases (rain, snow winds etc.) (Donagi, 2009).

 

Chemical Hazards: Chemical hazards is an extremely and sever OHS issue for plasters as they are encountering and working with many dangerous toxins throughout their day. Some of these hazards include: skin injuries ( occurs from direct contact with cement), possible exposure to asbestos (results from de-assembling structures that contain asbestos or plaster that is filled with asbestos) and the development of lung diseases (mostly chronic, this occurs from dust exposure) (Donagi, 2009).

 

Biological Hazards: There are two main biological hazards involved in everyday plastering. These comprise of the following: The development of diseases (Cause by contacts with certain insects, rodents and similar pests) and a substantial rise of your pulse rate (triggered by working in a strenuous manner under direct sunlight) (Donagi, 2009).  

 

 Ergonomic, Psychosocial and Organisational Factor Hazards: This hazard category is an extremely common in the world of plastering and can cause many issues for the workers involved. This issues/hazards include: Musculoskeletal injuries (This is related to work postures, the carrying or moving of heavy objects and repetitive strains), arm and wrist diseases (results from excessive movement of certain muscles) and sensory motor systems diseases (is caused by prolonged work in the squatting posture) (Donagi, 2009).

 

It is important for plasters like Steven to take great notice of all these hazards, as failing to do so could very well result in severe injuries, or even cost you your life.

 

Reference:

 

Donagi, P. (2009). International Hazard Datasheets on Occupation, Plasterer, Viewed 4th April 2014, http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_protect/---protrav/---safework/documents/publication/wcms_192259.pdf

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