Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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Are Drones a Good Thing or a Bad Thing?

Are Drones a Good Thing or a Bad Thing? | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Jeff Braun's Emergency Management blog shares an article first published in Governing magazine, and then later in Emergency Management magazine. Written by Eli Richman, and published by Emergency Management on November 30, 2012, the article provides an overview of the use of drones by emergency responders in the United States. It is becoming apparent that unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, can assist law enforcement agencies in a variety of activities. As pointed out in the article, perhaps it could be helpful in finding a lost hiker in a national forest. Closer to home, perhaps a drone could have been used a few years ago when local responders attempted to find a missing kayaker lost on a stream in Fort Bend County?

Fire first responders could use such a tool also; perhaps for getting a birds-eye view of a hazardous materials incident or major fire. Think about how valuable the use of such equipment might be as hundreds of responders attempt to fight a raging wildfire in close proximity to a subdivision. Emergency managers could use an unmanned aerial vehicle for conducting damage assessments after a hurricane. It would seem to be an efficient way of getting needed information without putting responder lives at risk. As a matter of fact, it has recently become known that NASA is readying a couple of experimental UAVs to track future storms. Why? To assist communities in preparing for the storms.

For more information on NASA’s use of drones.
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NASA Preps Drone Hurricane Hunters, But Misses Sandy

NASA Preps Drone Hurricane Hunters, But Misses Sandy | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

It’s the first time aerial storm-tracking has been carried out by the drone, which NASA hopes will one day augment manned flights and allow researchers to measure changes in hurricane intensity for much longer periods. (...)


“Despite the fact that it was an incredibly busy hurricane season, we happened to hit the lull of season,” says Scott Braun, a research meteorologist and mission director. (...)


“Imagine right now being able to do these flights over Sandy where you’re mapping out the surface wind field, particularly in areas north of the storm which has slammed into the areas of New Jersey and New York,” Braun says.


By Robert Beckhusen

Danger Room | Wired.com

October 30, 2012

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