Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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Google chief warns armed drones will soon be in the hands of terrorists and miniature models could be used to spy on neighbors

Google chief warns armed drones will soon be in the hands of terrorists and miniature models could be used to spy on neighbors | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

[13 Apr 2013]

The head of Google has warned drone technology proves a serious danger to global security and privacy unless an international treaty is put into place controlling the technology fast.

Eric Schmidt today said that the technology for armed unmanned planes will soon pass into the hands of terrorists posing huge security concerns across the globe. 

He also said that ever expanding drone technology is making smaller and cheaper models, including nano-drones, which could be used by nosy neighbors spying on each other in a dispute. 

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LYFT.io's curator insight, December 24, 2013 10:42 AM

Would you rather be spied on by your neighbor, or a multibillion dollar corporation?

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Hackers claim new air traffic system can be hijacked

Hackers claim new air traffic system can be hijacked | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The FAA is already in the process of rolling out its Next Generation Air Transportation System, of NextGen, a state-of-the-art program that will keep tabs on every plane in US airspace using GPS technology in lieu of relying on traditional radar. In the wake of a series of incidents where GPS signals were spoofed, though, serious problems could emerge in the coming years.


"If I can inject 50 extra flights onto an air traffic controller's screen, they are not going to know what is going on," Canadian computer consultant Brad Haines told NPR last year. Because Haines and others can emulate unencrypted and unauthenticated GPS signals sent from imaginary planes, he says NextGen stands to warrant some upgrades before it’s ready for the rest of the world.


"If you could introduce enough chaos into the system – for even an hour – that hour will ripple though the entire world's air traffic control,” Haines told NPR.


Haines’ ideas are outrageous, but not exactly out of this world. Just last year, a Texas college professor spoofed, or faked, GPS signals in order to hijack an unmanned aerial vehicle right in front of the US Department of Homeland Security. The United States stands to have as many as 30,000 UAVs, or drones, flying overhead by the end of the decade. When Todd Humphreys of the University of Texas at Austin spoke with RT though, he said those aircraft could come down if hackers have their way.


“The navigations systems of these drones have a variety of sensors,” Humphreys told RT, “…but at the very bottom is a GPS unit — and most of these drones that will be used in the civilian airspace have a civilian GPS unit which is wide open and vulnerable to this kind of attack. So if you can commander the GPS unit, then you can basically spoon feed false navigation information to the navigation center of these drones.”


“Spoofing a GPS receiver on a UAV is just another way of hijacking a plane,” the professor added in an interview with Fox News.


14 Jan 2013


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Majority of US drones still openly broadcasting secret video

Majority of US drones still openly broadcasting secret video | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The reconnaissance video streamed by U.S. military drones is still vulnerable to hacking, potentially allowing enemies to watch the valuable intelligence despite the military’s prior knowledge of the security weakness, according to a report from Wired Magazine.


Published: October 31, 2012

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Drones for dummies

Drones for dummies | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

If you've checked out the news these past few (or many) months, you've probably noticed some news about drones: Drones used by the CIA to vaporize suspected terrorists. Drones used by the United States military. Drones that deliver food. Drones used by cops. Drones possibly violating the US Constitution. Drones protecting wildlife. Drones in pop culture. Maybe this has left you with some burning questions about these increasingly prominent flying robots. Here's an easy-to-read, non-wonky guide to them—we'll call it Drones For Dummies.

 

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WASP: The Linux-powered flying spy drone that cracks Wi-Fi & GSM networks | Geek.com

WASP: The Linux-powered flying spy drone that cracks Wi-Fi & GSM networks | Geek.com | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Jul.29, 2011 - The Black Hat Security Conference and DEFCON bring together the world's professional hackers, security researchers, goverment representatives, journalists,...


Every year there’s a highlight to the conferences, and this year it looks like that highlight may be a flying drone, or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). This drone is called the Wireless Aerial Surveillance Platform, or WASP. It’s an ex-U.S. Army spy drone measuirng over 6-feet in length and wingspan that has been modified to make it more useful for hackers in our built-up, communication-heavy urban environments.


If you happen to see this yellow drone flying above your neighborhood you’d be right to be concerned. WASP is equipped with the tools to crack Wi-Fi network passwords made possible by an on-board VIA EPIA Pico-ITX PC running BackTrack Linux equipped with 32GB of storage to record information. BackTrack offers a full suite of digital forensics and penetration testing tools making it a good fit for this setup.


WASP can also act as a GSM network antenna meaning it will be able to eavesdrop on calls/text messages made over that network by any phone deciding to connect through it.


While such a drone may violate a few flying laws, it doesn’t break any FCC regulations as it uses the HAM radio frequency band or a 3G connection for communication. As to the reason for building it, creators Mike Tassey and Richard Perkins just wanted to prove there is a vulnerability that can easily be taken advantage of with a UAV such as this.


By: Matthew Humphries

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