Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
Curated by ddrrnt
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Flying Taser Drone Delivers 80,000 Volts of Paralyzing Fear

Flying Taser Drone Delivers 80,000 Volts of Paralyzing Fear | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A design studio has unveiled a flying drone, the CUPID drone,  that shoots taser darts that deliver 80,000 volts of paralyzing electricity.

 . . . .

On the company's site there are currently no details about when or if the device will ever be offered commercially, but in the video we can see that the CUPID is a hexacopter equipped with a laser sight used to target the remote-controlled taser darts

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Sílvia Dias's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:06 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

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Would You Shoot Your Neighbor’s Drone? - IEEE Spectrum

Would You Shoot Your Neighbor’s Drone? - IEEE Spectrum | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
“In the past year, it’s become more about privacy than safety,” says Brendan Schulman, special counsel at the law firm Kramer, Levin, Naftalis & Frankel, who is defending a client against the FAA in its first civilian drone case. People just don’t want snoopy robots spying on them.

 

Commentator Charles Krauthammer summed up that sentiment on Fox News in 2012 when he said, “I would predict—I’m not encouraging—but I predict the first guy who uses a Second Amendment weapon to bring a drone down that’s been hovering over his house is going to be a folk hero in this country.” Don’t dismiss such fiery talk as the ravings of a pundit bent on making news. Indeed, there have already been some domestic drone downings: An animal-rights group attempting to document the cruelty of “pigeon shoots” has had a camera-equipped multicopter blown out of the air more than once.

....

Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington, in Seattle, calls robotic aircraft a “privacy catalyst” because people have responded to them more strongly than to other kinds of surveillance technology. “You can visualize it, unlike what the [National Security Agency] is doing,” says Calo. “You get this visceral reaction to drones. Drones are part of a larger disconnect between how quickly surveillance technology evolves and how slowly privacy law does.”

ddrrnt's insight:

Ha! This is so true. No doubt, a drone will be shot down.

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Amazon Drone Usage and Changing Cities | Sustainable Cities Collective

Amazon Drone Usage and Changing Cities | Sustainable Cities Collective | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

...there are more legitimate concerns about a possible drone system in operation. Columnist and RC helicopter enthusiast Joshua Ziering highlights the fact that that when you take into account headwinds, the range could drop significantly. The supposedly failsafe eight engine design could still be taken down entirely by electrical shorts. And the fully computerized system, which relies on surface elevation databases, may not have access to a reliable database of power lines and trees.

 

There are still plenty of hurdles to clear, however. When multiple companies start adding drone systems, how will they coordinate? What about avoiding birds? Or people who try to steal a drone as it lands, to use as a Christmas present for the kids? Most importantly, how is a large scale drone system going to work after it leaves Bezos’s idealized suburban neighborhood and comes to dense urban areas? To avoid smashing into skyscrapers, drones will probably have to be routed over avenues, cutting their range. For deliveries to office buildings, will they land on the roof or at the front door, where they could very easily get pulverized by foot traffic? And for anyone living above the first floor in apartment complexes, the sound of buzzing drones passing by at two in the morning is likely to become really annoying, really fast.

All of these issues remain unsettled, and will potentially be addressed in the US by FAA regulations to be released in 2015.

 

Sembl.net

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Why Drone Delivery Will Be A Nightmare For Law Enforcement

Why Drone Delivery Will Be A Nightmare For Law Enforcement | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Amazon 'Prime Air' could be the first step toward a postal service free of surveillance.

 

Amazon's Jeff Bezos [went] on 6o Minutes Sunday night and reveal[ed] a “secret R&D project: The beginning of Silk Air Road? ‘Octocopter’ drones that will fly packages directly to your doorstep in 30 minutes.” Yup. an autonomous drone delivery service that would use GPS coordinates to navigate, called Amazon “Prime Air.”

 

After the shock and awe wore off, many commentators immediately pointed out that this is currently illegal. While the po-po and government entities are allowed to fly drones if they obtain authorization from the FAA, private use of drones is limited to hobbyists, and they have to keep the drones under 400

feet and within their line of sight. But that’s just a temporary hang-up. Congress has ordered the FAA to clear the skyway for commercial use of drones by 2015. So, yes, Amazon will be able to get emergency diapers, toilet paper, or s-pound gummy bears (depending on the Octocopter’s weight limits) to you in 30 minutes (and Google will be able to launch ‘Drone Map’, and Facebook will be able to launch ‘Drone Stalk’, and on and on).

 

Law enforcement may already be gritting its teeth over the idea of legal drone delivery though. Being

able to send things by drone could be hugely disruptive to the existing mail system: a peer-to-peer postal service that cuts out the USPS and FedEx. That’s fine when Amazon is shipping out books, but what about the kind of deliveries that law enforcement wants to be able to track? The existing

postal system is full of surveillance.

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Hackers claim new air traffic system can be hijacked

Hackers claim new air traffic system can be hijacked | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The FAA is already in the process of rolling out its Next Generation Air Transportation System, of NextGen, a state-of-the-art program that will keep tabs on every plane in US airspace using GPS technology in lieu of relying on traditional radar. In the wake of a series of incidents where GPS signals were spoofed, though, serious problems could emerge in the coming years.


"If I can inject 50 extra flights onto an air traffic controller's screen, they are not going to know what is going on," Canadian computer consultant Brad Haines told NPR last year. Because Haines and others can emulate unencrypted and unauthenticated GPS signals sent from imaginary planes, he says NextGen stands to warrant some upgrades before it’s ready for the rest of the world.


"If you could introduce enough chaos into the system – for even an hour – that hour will ripple though the entire world's air traffic control,” Haines told NPR.


Haines’ ideas are outrageous, but not exactly out of this world. Just last year, a Texas college professor spoofed, or faked, GPS signals in order to hijack an unmanned aerial vehicle right in front of the US Department of Homeland Security. The United States stands to have as many as 30,000 UAVs, or drones, flying overhead by the end of the decade. When Todd Humphreys of the University of Texas at Austin spoke with RT though, he said those aircraft could come down if hackers have their way.


“The navigations systems of these drones have a variety of sensors,” Humphreys told RT, “…but at the very bottom is a GPS unit — and most of these drones that will be used in the civilian airspace have a civilian GPS unit which is wide open and vulnerable to this kind of attack. So if you can commander the GPS unit, then you can basically spoon feed false navigation information to the navigation center of these drones.”


“Spoofing a GPS receiver on a UAV is just another way of hijacking a plane,” the professor added in an interview with Fox News.


14 Jan 2013


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Citizen Drone Warfare

Via HuffingtonPost
An American enthusiast has outfitted a drone with paintball cannons as part of an effort to show how 'civilian warfare' robots could be used for personal defense.

The robot, shown on YouTube, can handily dispatch cardboard cutout targets.

The video was made as part of an effort to find out what happens when drones are used for unethical or illegal purposes.

The drone also had a mount for a handgun, according to DangerInfo.
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Drone crashes mount at civilian airports

Drone crashes mount at civilian airports | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Reaper and Predator crashes in Africa occur perilously close to passenger jets, documents show.


A review of thousands of pages of unclassified Air Force investigation reports, obtained by The Washington Post under public-records requests, shows that drones flying from civilian airports have been plagued by setbacks.


Among the problems repeatedly cited are pilot error, mechanical failure, software bugs in the “brains” of the aircraft and poor coordination with civilian air-traffic controllers.


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High anxiety on the Hill about civilian drone use

High anxiety on the Hill about civilian drone use | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

When it comes to drones, the DHS is MIA, lawmakers said ...


Members of Congress from both parties fear that the Department of Homeland Security hasn’t crafted adequate security protocols for the looming explosion of private, domestic drone use.


Witnesses, including a University of Texas professor (Todd Humphreys) who hijacked a drone last month, told the House Homeland Security subcommittee on oversight, investigations and management that, with the proper equipment and expertise, it’s relatively easy to jam drones’ GPS signals and take control of them.


Drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, are currently used only by the military and law enforcement agencies.


But they will be available for commercial and personal use beginning in 2015, and critics say the federal government isn’t considering how dangerous they could be in the wrong hands.


By Ben Wolfgang

19 Jul 2012

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Majority of US drones still openly broadcasting secret video

Majority of US drones still openly broadcasting secret video | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The reconnaissance video streamed by U.S. military drones is still vulnerable to hacking, potentially allowing enemies to watch the valuable intelligence despite the military’s prior knowledge of the security weakness, according to a report from Wired Magazine.


Published: October 31, 2012

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Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A drone journalist is suing a local police department in a case that may provide a stepping stone to broader legislation dealing with who has the right to fly drones and take video from the sky.

Pedro Rivera filed a suit against two officers of the Hartford, Conn., police department on Feb. 18 after they convinced his part-time employer, a local TV station, to suspend him for a week that began on Feb. 3. The suspension followed a department investigation into whether Rivera illegally used his drone to film the scene of a fatal accident.

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Google chief warns armed drones will soon be in the hands of terrorists and miniature models could be used to spy on neighbors

Google chief warns armed drones will soon be in the hands of terrorists and miniature models could be used to spy on neighbors | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

[13 Apr 2013]

The head of Google has warned drone technology proves a serious danger to global security and privacy unless an international treaty is put into place controlling the technology fast.

Eric Schmidt today said that the technology for armed unmanned planes will soon pass into the hands of terrorists posing huge security concerns across the globe. 

He also said that ever expanding drone technology is making smaller and cheaper models, including nano-drones, which could be used by nosy neighbors spying on each other in a dispute. 

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LYFT.io's curator insight, December 24, 2013 10:42 AM

Would you rather be spied on by your neighbor, or a multibillion dollar corporation?

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Another Problem for Amazon's Delivery Drones? Angry Birds

Another Problem for Amazon's Delivery Drones? Angry Birds | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

 Amazon-branded delivery drones may look to us humans like, well, Amazon-branded delivery drones, [however] they look to birds like ... other birds. Encroaching birds. And that's because, as Slate's Nicholas Lund points out, birds—especially predatory raptors, your hawks and your eagles and your harriers—are territorial. Our airspace is also, in a very literal way, birdspace, with birds carving up that soaring territory among themselves, defending their celestial turf against would-be interlopers. Not just with an "excuse me, sir, I think you may be in my seat" ... but with violence. Those dudes will put a bird on it in the most Darwinian way imaginable. 

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Critics object to Obama nominating ‘Mr. Drone’ John Brennan to CIA head | The Raw Story

Critics object to Obama nominating ‘Mr. Drone’ John Brennan to CIA head | The Raw Story | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The nomination of President Barack Obama’s top counter-terrorism advisor John Brennan to head the CIA has sparked outrage and concern about America’s growing drones programme and its use for targeted killings of suspected Islamic militants.


Brennan has been a key architect of drones policy under Obama and many experts believe that the use of the unmanned robot planes in countries such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia is likely to increase if he becomes America’s top spy.


“If Brennan leads the CIA then you ain’t seen nothing yet. That troubles me greatly,” said Amos Guiora, a legal professor at the Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah. (...)


Officially, the CIA still does not admit that its programme exists, but Brennan has been closely identified with promoting its use in the Obama administration. He has been dubbed “Mr Drone” in the media and has been the public face of the programme when it comes to arguing that its use is both legal and effective. In a speech last year at the Woodrow Wilson Center he said: “There is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely piloted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield, at least when the country involved consents or is unable or unwilling to take action against the threat.” (...)


“John Brennan has deliberately deceived the American public about the effects of these drone strikes, claiming they haven’t killed any civilians and refuses to acknowledge empirical evidence to the contrary,” said Leah Bolger, president of anti-war group Veterans for Peace. “The combat drone program is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people, none of whom received any sort of due process; were citizens of a country with which we are not at war; and were murdered not as a result of military action, but by a civilian agency – the CIA,” she added. (...)


In the US the increased use of drones has given birth to a protest movement that has encompassed numerous groups all over the country. Anti-drone activists are now planning a major protest for Obama’s inauguration in Washington, DC, this month and also a month of actions in April aimed at military bases where drones are controlled, factories where they are made and universities where drone research is carried out. “More people are waking up to this,” said Nick Mottern, director of a group called Know Drones.


Paul Harris, The Gaurdian

10 Jan 2013

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‘Citizen Drone Warfare’: Hobbyist explores a frightening scenario

‘Citizen Drone Warfare’: Hobbyist explores a frightening scenario | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Titled “Citizen Drone Warfare” and posted to YouTube last week by an anonymous man calling himself “Milo Danger,” the video shows a hobbyist drone equipped with a custom-mounted paintball pistol flying over a grassy field and peppering human-shaped shooting-range targets with pellets.


Following an attack pass by the drone, one of the targets sports three large red blotches on its head and neck area.


“I wanted to show an inevitability of what I think will happen with these drones,” said “Milo,” who lives on the West Coast and spoke to The Washington Times on condition of anonymity. “I’m not advocating bad activities. But I wanted to raise some of the ethical issues we need to think about with this new technology.

ddrrnt's insight:

See the Danger Info video here.

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Britain’s ‘under-trained’ drone pilots create ‘significant risks’

Britain’s ‘under-trained’ drone pilots create ‘significant risks’ | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Badly trained pilots are creating “significant risks” to Britain’s unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) programme, a military investigation has found.

A probe by the Military Aviation Authority found that “increasing demands” on drones used for surveillance and intelligence-gathering were “constraining the length of time available to train and qualify” new pilots, according to extracts printed in Tuesday’s Times.

MPs are due to debate the country’s involvement in drone warfare later Tuesday and Labour plans to push the government over whether unmanned aircraft will be deployed to kill terrorist suspects.

“We must clarify the rules, given the significance and spread of the technology,” shadow armed forces minister Kevan Jones will say, according to the Times.

“Whether valid or not, there is a public perception that unmanned technology is shrouded in secrecy, which increases the potential for its demonisation.

“Being open about usage and codifying our policy would help confront this, and would increase accountability and transparency in the system,” he will add.

The Raw Story
By Agence France-Presse
11 Dec 2012
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Domestic drone backers worry about privacy and security

Domestic drone backers worry about privacy and security | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Within the span of about two weeks in July, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International issued a code of conduct and backed a defense spending bill that would restrict the government’s use of drones for surveillance. Lawmakers who, in February, mandated that the Federal Aviation Administration permit more drones to fly stateside voted in June to ban weaponized ones. (...)


DHS officials declined to appear at Rep. Michael McCaul’s July 19 hearing, which largely focused on the department’s role in protecting citizens from drone abuse. There is bipartisan concern that remotely piloted planes will capture personal information, fall victim to hackers—or worse—when the FAA law takes effect in 2015. (...)


McCaul maintains his concerns about the safety of drones have always existed. “We are less than two and a half years from our skies opening up to widespread use of drones by law enforcement and the private sector and no federal agency has taken the lead to address security and privacy,” he told Government Executive in an email. “This is the responsibility of the Department of Homeland Security, and as chairman of the subcommittee with oversight jurisdiction it is my job to ensure DHS addresses these concerns. The department needs to provide guidance on security and privacy now, in advance of this proliferation, not after the fact.”


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WASP: The Linux-powered flying spy drone that cracks Wi-Fi & GSM networks | Geek.com

WASP: The Linux-powered flying spy drone that cracks Wi-Fi & GSM networks | Geek.com | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Jul.29, 2011 - The Black Hat Security Conference and DEFCON bring together the world's professional hackers, security researchers, goverment representatives, journalists,...


Every year there’s a highlight to the conferences, and this year it looks like that highlight may be a flying drone, or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). This drone is called the Wireless Aerial Surveillance Platform, or WASP. It’s an ex-U.S. Army spy drone measuirng over 6-feet in length and wingspan that has been modified to make it more useful for hackers in our built-up, communication-heavy urban environments.


If you happen to see this yellow drone flying above your neighborhood you’d be right to be concerned. WASP is equipped with the tools to crack Wi-Fi network passwords made possible by an on-board VIA EPIA Pico-ITX PC running BackTrack Linux equipped with 32GB of storage to record information. BackTrack offers a full suite of digital forensics and penetration testing tools making it a good fit for this setup.


WASP can also act as a GSM network antenna meaning it will be able to eavesdrop on calls/text messages made over that network by any phone deciding to connect through it.


While such a drone may violate a few flying laws, it doesn’t break any FCC regulations as it uses the HAM radio frequency band or a 3G connection for communication. As to the reason for building it, creators Mike Tassey and Richard Perkins just wanted to prove there is a vulnerability that can easily be taken advantage of with a UAV such as this.


By: Matthew Humphries

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