Rise of the Drones
Follow
4.7K views | +0 today
Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Would Lincoln use drones? - WWLD?

Would Lincoln use drones? - WWLD? | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Lincoln probably would have loved drones, but may have held off using them to kill for strategic reasons

...

 

First off, Lincoln was obsessed with military technology and innovation, so there’s little question that he would have been intrigued by drones, had they been invented in the 1860s. He often personally witnessed demonstrations of new inventions and pushed for their advancement and field testing through the War Department bureaucracy, in part by promoting officers who held a similar love of innovation. Under his tenure, the Union became one of the world’s first militaries to use repeating rifles (a vast improvement over the single-shot muzzle-loaders it replaced), rifled artillery, machine guns, rockets, armored “ironclad” warships, and torpedoes, and he made advanced strategic use of railroads and especially the telegraph.

 

He would have loved to have had drones’ surveillance power, as he championed the unprecedented use of balloons to spy on the enemy. When the aging head of the Army initially rejected the balloon idea, Lincoln personally marched inventor Thaddeus Lowe to the War Department and declared that he would be head of the new Aeronautics Corps for the Army.  “I have pleasure in sending you this first dispatch ever telegraphed from an aerial station and in acknowledging indebtedness to your encouragement for the opportunity of demonstrating the availability of the science of aeronautics in the military service of the country,” Lowe telegraphed to the president from a balloon over the National Mall.

 

But obviously drones did not exist in Lincoln’s day. So what about some kind of analogous technology that could safely kill enemies without a battle. Would Lincoln have been morally and legally comfortable with that?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Homeland Security increasingly lending drones to local police

Homeland Security increasingly lending drones to local police | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
The little-noticed August 2011 incident at the Lakota, N.D., ranch, which ended peacefully, was a watershed moment for Americans: it was one of the first known times an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) owned by the U.S. government was used against civilians for local police work.

Since then, the Washington Guardian has confirmed, DHS and its Customs and Border Protection agency have deployed drones — originally bought to guard America’s borders — to assist local law enforcement and other federal agencies on several occasions.

The practice is raising questions inside and outside government about whether federal officials may be creating an ad-hoc, loan-a-drone program without formal rules for engagement, privacy protection or taxpayer reimbursements. The drones used by CPB can cost between $15 million and $34 million each to buy, and have hourly operational costs as well.

In addition, DHS recently began distributing $4 million in grants to help local law enforcement buy its own, smaller versions of drones, opening a new market for politically connected drone makers as the wars overseas shrink.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Who is allowed to fly a drone? That depends

Who is allowed to fly a drone? That depends | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
A law passed last year by President Barack Obama gave U.S. regulators until September 2015 to cobble together rules to oversee unmanned flight.

 

The FAA estimates that by 2020, there will be 30,000 drones in the skies above the U.S. Current laws do not address the privacy concerns hanging over an industry that has produced some drones the size of commercial jets, and others smaller than a sparrow.

 

“It’s a crazy, daunting task, trying to write sweeping legislation for a new technology,” said Wells Bennett, a visiting fellow in national security at the Brookings Institution who has studied civilian drones. “You need both people who are steeped in cutting-edged technology at the same time as understanding the arcane regulatory regime.”

 

Bennett said many federal and state agencies ranging from the Departments of Homeland Security and Justice to NASA are contributing to the FAA’s efforts.

 

A spokeswoman for the FAA, Alison Duquette, said that out of the agency’s total workforce of 49,031, 39 federal employees are currently working on the integration.

 

The application for a Certificate of Authorization (COA) permitting operation of a drone is about 22 pages. Duquette told the Star the information sought in the application “will enable us make an informed decision on whether to approve the COA application.”

 

But who should be allowed to operate a drone?

 

It will depend on the type of aircraft and the purpose, Duquette said. In some cases, such as recreational models, no authorization will be required, she said.

 

“In other cases, the pilots, observers and other personnel may require training and/or certification.”

 

Currently, the FAA allows some law enforcement and government agencies to obtain two-year certificates to operate drones. Corporations aren’t allowed to fly drones at all until the new FAA rules are introduced. Model airplane enthusiasts don’t face such restrictions, as long as they maintain sight of their toys and don’t let them fly higher than 150 metres.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone journalism takes off

Drone journalism takes off | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

As the media starts to deploy small toy-like drones to cover stories, what ethical and safety issues are arising?


Drone Journalism Lab founder Matt Waite said: "What are the property rights over your home? Am I trespassing by flying over your house? Beyond questions of personal privacy, another issue raised is the free speech issues raised by drones. For instance if there is a bad chemical spill... and police close the area down to keep people away... can I fly a drone over it and get a look? What if police close the airspace? Where is the line between the public's right to know about something versus the state's want for security?" (...)


"I understand people being uncomfortable with the faceless 'capital M' media getting flying robots with cameras. It's a similar concern as police getting the same: eyes in the skies, watching all the time." (...)


The assocation doesn't have a problem with the concept of responsible drone journalism and Ms Mactavish laughs off concerns over the potential for a greater invasion of privacy. "You've got to keep this in perspective - they won't be doing anything new. Google Earth can look right down into your backyard. Satellites have been doing this for 20 years. "They've arrived... Now it's all about safe and ethical deployment."


By Mark Corcoran from Foreign Correspondent

ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Feb 21, 2012



more...
No comment yet.