Rise of the Drones
6.6K views | +0 today
Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Flying Taser Drone Delivers 80,000 Volts of Paralyzing Fear

Flying Taser Drone Delivers 80,000 Volts of Paralyzing Fear | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A design studio has unveiled a flying drone, the CUPID drone,  that shoots taser darts that deliver 80,000 volts of paralyzing electricity.

 . . . .

On the company's site there are currently no details about when or if the device will ever be offered commercially, but in the video we can see that the CUPID is a hexacopter equipped with a laser sight used to target the remote-controlled taser darts

more...
Sílvia Dias's curator insight, March 10, 2014 4:06 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Dubai Debuts Drones For Crowd Control

Dubai Debuts Drones For Crowd Control | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Dubai Police announced it is now using quadrocopters with 60 minutes' flight time to monitor crowds at soccer matches.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drones: Eyes in the sky

Drones: Eyes in the sky | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

As technology advances, unmanned aircraft used for surveillance are moving from the battlefield to your backyard, and not everyone is happy with it (with poll)

 

In Pakistan, since 2004, from under 2,000 at the low end to more than 3,400. The CIA isn't saying. So who's being killed -- terrorists or civilians?

 

"The data show that only a relatively small number of high-level targets have been killed, something on the order of 50, estimates vary. which is roughly 2 percent of those who have been killed," said James Cavallaro, a law professor at Stanford University. "Which means that 98 percent of those killed have not been high-level targets."

 

Cavallaro is co-author of a paper critical of U.S. drone use. He and his team went to Pakistan.

 

"We don't hear enough about the costs, civilians killed, civilians injured, destruction of communities, growth of anti-Americanism, and fomenting recruitment for terrorist groups," he told Teichner. "When all of that is considered, there are serious doubts about whether drones are the best option. (...)

 

Now, drones are headed off the battlefield. They're already coming your way.

 

AeroVironment, the California company that sells the military something like 85 percent of its fleet, is marketing them now to public safety agencies.

 

Steve Gitlin, a vice-president of AeroVironment, demonstrated for Teicher the company's Qube system: "It's a small unmanned aircraft that's designed to give first responders an immediate eye in the sky so they can find lost kids, they can investigate accidents, they can support disaster recovery for earthquakes in California, tornadoes in the Midwest, hurricanes in the Gulf Coast.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Are Drones a Good Thing or a Bad Thing?

Are Drones a Good Thing or a Bad Thing? | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Jeff Braun's Emergency Management blog shares an article first published in Governing magazine, and then later in Emergency Management magazine. Written by Eli Richman, and published by Emergency Management on November 30, 2012, the article provides an overview of the use of drones by emergency responders in the United States. It is becoming apparent that unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, can assist law enforcement agencies in a variety of activities. As pointed out in the article, perhaps it could be helpful in finding a lost hiker in a national forest. Closer to home, perhaps a drone could have been used a few years ago when local responders attempted to find a missing kayaker lost on a stream in Fort Bend County?

Fire first responders could use such a tool also; perhaps for getting a birds-eye view of a hazardous materials incident or major fire. Think about how valuable the use of such equipment might be as hundreds of responders attempt to fight a raging wildfire in close proximity to a subdivision. Emergency managers could use an unmanned aerial vehicle for conducting damage assessments after a hurricane. It would seem to be an efficient way of getting needed information without putting responder lives at risk. As a matter of fact, it has recently become known that NASA is readying a couple of experimental UAVs to track future storms. Why? To assist communities in preparing for the storms.

For more information on NASA’s use of drones.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Homeland Security increasingly lending drones to local police

Homeland Security increasingly lending drones to local police | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
The little-noticed August 2011 incident at the Lakota, N.D., ranch, which ended peacefully, was a watershed moment for Americans: it was one of the first known times an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) owned by the U.S. government was used against civilians for local police work.

Since then, the Washington Guardian has confirmed, DHS and its Customs and Border Protection agency have deployed drones — originally bought to guard America’s borders — to assist local law enforcement and other federal agencies on several occasions.

The practice is raising questions inside and outside government about whether federal officials may be creating an ad-hoc, loan-a-drone program without formal rules for engagement, privacy protection or taxpayer reimbursements. The drones used by CPB can cost between $15 million and $34 million each to buy, and have hourly operational costs as well.

In addition, DHS recently began distributing $4 million in grants to help local law enforcement buy its own, smaller versions of drones, opening a new market for politically connected drone makers as the wars overseas shrink.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Brazil’s Homemade Drones

Brazil’s Homemade Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

“It ends up demystifying this equipment, to show that it’s not only restricted for military use but also something of daily use,” says AGX Tecnologia consultant Jen John Lee in the basement of these homey headquarters.


Going against the trend of Latin American nations purchasing Isreali-made drones for drug-war policing and border patrolling, AGX uses only Brazilian technology developed at the nearby University of São Paulo and sees its target market in the nation’s growing agricultural industry and state “environmental police” forces tasked with monitoring illegal extraction of natural resources.


Brazil’s Federal Police is indeed implementing a fleet of Israeli-made UAVs along its porous frontier to monitor drug trafficking. But the São Paulo Environmental Police has other objectives. They will be the first team in the state to regularly employ unarmed UAVs to monitor threats in rural areas, such as deforestation and illegal fishing.


Taylor Barnes | Oct 18, 2011

latintrade.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone Program Aims To ‘Accelerate’ Use Of Unmanned Aircraft By Police

The $4 million Air-based Technologies Program, which will test and evaluate small, unmanned aircraft systems, is designed to be a “middleman” between drone manufacturers and first-responder agencies “before they jump into the pool,” said John Appleby, a manager in the DHS Science and Technology Directorate’s division of borders and maritime security. (...)


“If DHS is going to serve as a Consumer Reports for local authorities that are interested in buying drones and help them figure out which drones perform well and appropriate for their needs, that’s great,” said Jay Stanley of the American Civil Liberties Union. “At the same time, we do know that DHS institutionally has had a role in pushing local governments to increase their surveillance through grants. I would hope they would not use this program to encourage unnecessary surveillance.”


via Unmanned Systems Technology

May 22nd, 2012

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A drone journalist is suing a local police department in a case that may provide a stepping stone to broader legislation dealing with who has the right to fly drones and take video from the sky.

Pedro Rivera filed a suit against two officers of the Hartford, Conn., police department on Feb. 18 after they convinced his part-time employer, a local TV station, to suspend him for a week that began on Feb. 3. The suspension followed a department investigation into whether Rivera illegally used his drone to film the scene of a fatal accident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Domestic drones are already reshaping U.S.crime-fighting

Domestic drones are already reshaping U.S.crime-fighting | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

"We can now bring the crime scene right into the jury box, and literally re-enact the crime for jurors," he said.

"Miller can program the department's GPS-enabled, 3.5-pound DraganflyerX6 quad copter to fly two concentric circles, at two elevations, capturing about 70 photos, for about $25 an hour. He then feeds those images into online digital mapping software, which creates a virtual crime scene that he uploads to his iPad."

"Holding the iPad with one hand, Miller recently demonstrated for Reuters how 3-D digital reconstruction can serve as a road map for investigators, and, soon, for juries."

 

"Miller said the same technique can often eliminate the need to shut down highways after accidents so investigators can take accurate measurements."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Florida police want to use drones for crowd control

Florida police want to use drones for crowd control | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Police want legislation that would limit their use of drones to include an exception for crowd control.

(...)

Sen. Joe Negron, a Stuart Republican, said the exception would have allowed King George to use drones against the Boston Tea Party if the unmanned aircraft had existed in the 18th century.

 

The Community Affairs Committee unanimously approved the bill (SB 92), although several members urged Negron to consider loosening its restrictions.

 

The bill would ban the use of drones for law and code enforcement with three major exceptions, including terrorism.

 

It also would allow drone use authorized by search warrants and in cases of imminent danger, such as a missing child.

ddrrnt's insight:

Looks like decent legislation.  It seems to keep privacy worries out of the equation.  However, "crowd control" needs more clarification because it could apply to such a wide variety of contexts.    I mean, big cities are essentially crowded, most of the time.  So..?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowd_control

more...
Brittany Blake's curator insight, December 22, 2013 6:56 PM

How can drones be used in crowd control?

Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Berkeley, wants to establish a "no drone zone"

Berkeley, wants to establish a "no drone zone" | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
From Patch.

Even as the Alameda County Sheriff’s Department considers buying an unmanned aerial vehicle, Berkeley City Council will discuss declaring the city a No Drone Zone.

Arguing that drones are unsafe and pose a threat to civil liberties, Berkeley’s Peace and Justice Commission is recommending that the city council adopt a resolution this month proclaiming:

"1. Berkeley a No Drone Zone and instructing the City Attorney to perform the necessary legal tasks to transform this declaration of a No Drone Zone into an Ordinance for the City of Berkeley wherein drones are hereby banned from airspace.

2. That drones will not be purchased, leased, borrowed, tested or otherwise used by any agency of the City of Berkeley over the City of Berkeley, including drones in transit.

3. That exemptions will be made for hobbyists to continue to fly remote controlled model aircraft in specified areas, away from dwellings and the urban cityscape of people and buildings as long as those devices are not equipped with any kind of camera or audio surveillance equipment."
ddrrnt's insight:

Via Patch 

Does the county sheriff need a drone?

Also see: 

Calif. Residents Concerned By Drone Use In Law Enforcement

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Sheriff’s ‘Crowd Control’ Spy Drone Suspended After Privacy Uproar

Sheriff’s ‘Crowd Control’ Spy Drone Suspended After Privacy Uproar | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

"Despite official assurances that the drone would only be used for:
search and rescue efforts the Sheriff has previously suggested that the drone could be used:


to hunt for marijuana farms, and “track suspects with guns,” referring to such operations as “proactive policing.”


"The device can also be fitted with thermal imaging devices that would allow police to: see inside buildings, as well as license plate readers and laser radar."


"An internal memo from the Sheriff’s Office dated July 20 also indicated that the department identified uses for the drone, including:
monitoring barricaded suspects, investigative and tactical surveillance, intelligence gathering, tracking suspicious persons and overseeing large crowd control disturbances."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

AUVSI: Unmanned aerial vehicles help law-enforcement agencies save money, catch criminals - Avionics Intelligence

AUVSI: Unmanned aerial vehicles help law-enforcement agencies save money, catch criminals - Avionics Intelligence | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

“The Sheriff’s Office in Mesa County, Colo., operates an unmanned aircraft at the cost of $3.36 per hour, compared to $250 to $600 per hour for a manned aircraft,” AUVSI reveals.


The purchase price of a UAS is also significantly less than a manned aircraft, at a cost roughly the same as a patrol car with standard police gear. In fact, agencies are increasingly opting to purchase a compact unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), or drone, in lieu of a new patrol car. This growing trend is spurring privacy debates, talk of and demand for increased legislation, and new court cases.


The vast majority of UAS currently flying in the U.S. are small models that weigh less than 25 pounds and can fit in the trunk of a car, according to AUVSI officials, who cite a recent poll by Monmouth University in West Long Branch, N.J.


“An overwhelming majority of Americans support the idea of using drones to help with search and rescue missions (80%). Two-thirds of the public also support using drones to track down runaway criminals (67%) and control illegal immigration on the nation’s border (64%),” reveals a Monmouth University spokesperson.


September 6, 2012
By Courtney Howard

more...
No comment yet.